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Doctoral Courses


Spring
3 credits

A recent syllabus may be viewed here.

This course offers students advanced instruction in statistical models that cover useful quantitative tools in public health research. The course focuses on statistical techniques and data analysis that utilize general linear regression models for continuous, categorical, or discrete outcomes commonly seen in health and policy studies. Examples are drawn from broad areas of public health and policy research. In this course students will gain knowledge and understanding of statistical concepts of generalized linear models and the implementation and application of the techniques.

Fall and Spring
3 credits

A recent syllabus may be view here.

The Global Public Health Doctoral Colloquium is a forum in which prominent and up and coming researchers present their work on pressing topics related to global public health. It offers doctoral students and faculty a chance to hear from their colleagues, while engaging in a dialogue about current research. Open only to public health doctoral students.

Spring semester
3 credits

A recent syllabus may be viewed here.

This course provides doctoral students with a learning context taught in the form of a workshop to fully develop the dissertation proposal, including the delineation of the format of the dissertation, the dissertation rationale, significance and aims, the conceptual framework guiding the work, and the methodological approaches to be utilized in the dissertation proposal. Each student’s dissertation proposal will be discussed and workshopped throughout the course of the semester in in class, and it is expected that throughout the course each student will work closely with their dissertation Chairperson in refining the content and the details of the study. This course will guide students from conceptual clarity to the completion of a full draft of the written proposal. Each student will complete a draft of the proposal by the close of the semester.

Spring
3 credits

A recent syllabus may be viewed here.

This course will cover in-depth, advanced methods for modern epidemiologic study design, sampling, quantitative measurement, including reliability and validity, and statistical analysis appropriate for selected study designs relevant to global health research and practice. Considerations regarding the responsible conduct of research in international settings will be integrated throughout the course. This doctoral-level lecture/seminar course is offered to graduate students with a basic knowledge of epidemiologic and biostatistical principles, including causal inference, standard study design, confounding, bias, validity, and commonly-used analytical methods.

Spring
3 credits

A recent syllabus may be found here.

The findings from clinical, health services, and social science research cannot change population health outcomes unless health care systems, organizations, and professionals adopt them in practice and communities are receptive to them (Eccles et al 2009). This doctoral-level course provides students a set of frameworks for understanding the basis for health promotion and disease prevention interventions; reviews critical elements in planning, implementing, and evaluating such interventions; identifies challenges in scaling up interventions; and reviews the state of the art in knowledge about translating research findings into large-scale programs and policies.

Fall
3 credits

A recent syllabus may be viewed here.

This course will explore approaches to conducting research with and in communities experiencing health disparities. In particular, participants will become familiar with Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) approach. Participants will become familiar with the historical, theoretical and philosophical perspectives that have informed CBPR. The course will review various methodological approaches utilized in conducting community health research including qualitative methods such as ethnographic observation and in-depth interviews (individual or focus group) used alone or in combination with quantitative surveys and analyses of clinical or administrative data. Research in communities and natural (non-laboratory) settings requires flexibility and adaptability, especially when conducted in global sites where conditions are dynamic and often uncontrolled. Students will engage in the analysis and presentation of exemplar case studies. They will have the opportunity of observing a community based research setting and interviewing collaborating community and academic partners. This advanced course assumes the student has had previous coursework in research design and data collection in both quantitative and qualitative methods.

Fall
3 credits

A recent syllabus may be viewed here.

This doctoral-level course examines an array of paradigms, theories and conceptual models used in public health. These are roughly categorized into the following domains: a) biomedical; b) psychological; c) organizational; d) socio-cultural; and e) structural /critical. Specific public health problems—HIV/AIDS, cancer and mental disorders—will be examined using relevant theories. Emphasis will be on adopting a comparative, critical and integrative (bio-psycho-social) perspective on theories and key concepts in public health practice, policy and research. 

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