Andrew Goodman

Andrew Goodman
Andrew Goodman

Clinical Professor of Public Health Policy and Management

Professional overview

Dr. Andrew Goodman is a population health expert who worked at the New York City Health Department for more than 30 years. He offers technical assistance and implementation support to a variety of organizations, provides training for students, policymakers, and others, and conducts research on population health, policy, and interventions.

As the former Deputy Commissioner for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention at the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Dr. Goodman oversaw the District Public Health Offices (DPHOs), the Office of School Health, the Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Tobacco Control, and Maternal Infant and Reproductive Health programs. He also served on numerous local, state, and national expert advisory committees, including those addressing childhood lead poisoning and asthma.

He is working with government agencies and a union-management project to design workplace health programs for city employees and hospital workers, and several community organizations to design, implement, and evaluate community health interventions and augment community health activities.

Dr. Goodman leads the Community Health Lab, which promotes the implementation of effective but underutilized policies, practices and programs to improve health, prevent disease, and achieve health equity. Through policy analyses and innovative population health approaches, the Lab aids stakeholders with strategic planning, program design, organizational capacity building, communications, and evaluation to improve health outcomes and status.

Education

BA, History, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
MD, Medicine, Washington University, St. Louis, MO
MPH, Columbia University, New York, NY

Honors and awards

Public Health Achievement Award, NYC Department of Health and Columbia University School of Public Health (2000)
Board Certified in Pediatrics (1985)
National Board of Examiners (1980)

Areas of research and study

Chronic Diseases
Community Health
Health Equity
New York Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
Population Health
Prevention Interventions
Public Health Policy
Systems Interventions

Publications

Publications

Becoming a Professional: Online Discussion Boards as a Tool for Developing Professionalism among MPH Students

Merzel, C., & Goodman, A.

Publication year

2016

Journal title

Pedagogy in Health Promotion

Volume

2

Issue

3

Page(s)

154-160

Childhood asthma and extreme values of body mass index: The Harlem Children's Zone Asthma Initiative

Kwon, H. L., Ortiz, B., Swaner, R., Shoemaker, K., Jean-Louis, B., Northridge, M. E., Vaughan, R. D., Marx, T., Goodman, A., Borrell, L. N., & Nicholas, S. W.

Publication year

2006

Journal title

Journal of Urban Health

Volume

83

Issue

3

Page(s)

421-433
Abstract
To examine the association between body mass index (BMI) percentile and asthma in children 2-11 years of age, we performed a cross-sectional analysis of 853 Black and Hispanic children from a community-based sample of 2- to 11-year olds with measured heights and weights screened for asthma by the Harlem Children's Zone Asthma Initiative. Current asthma was defined as parent/guardian-reported diagnosis of asthma and asthma-related symptoms or emergency care in the previous 12 months. Among girls, asthma prevalence increased approximately linearly with increasing body mass index (BMI) percentile, from a low of 12.0% among underweight girls (BMI ≤5th percentile) to a high of 33.3% among girls at risk for overweight (BMI 85th-94th percentile). Among boys, asthma prevalence was associated in a U-shaped curve with the extremes of BMI percentile, that is, 36.4% among underweight boys, 19.1% among normal weight boys (BMI 6th-84th percentile), and 34.8% among overweight boys (>95th percentile). After adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, and household smoking, among girls, having asthma was associated with being at risk for overweight (odds ratio [OR], 2.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-5.0) and being overweight (OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.2-3.8) compared to normal weight; among boys, having asthma was associated both with overweight (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.4-4.3) and with underweight (OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.1-7.7). Large, prospective studies that include very young children are needed to further explore the observed association between underweight and asthma among boys. Early interventions that concomitantly address asthma and weight gain are needed among pre-school and school-aged children.

Interdisciplinary planning for healthier communities: Findings from the harlem children's zone asthma initiative

Spielman, S. E., Golembeski, C. A., Northridge, M. E., Vaughan, R. D., Swaner, R., Jean-Louis, B., Shoemaker, K., Klihr-Beall, S., Polley, E., Cushman, L. F., Ortiz, B., Hutchinson, V. E., Nicholas, S. W., Marx, T., Hayes, R., Goodman, A., & Sclar, E. D.

Publication year

2006

Journal title

Journal of the American Planning Association

Volume

72

Issue

1

Page(s)

100-108
Abstract
Health disparities that affect whole communities may involve factors like housing quality that lie at least partly within planners' realm of policy influence. This article demonstrates a link between housing and childhood asthma. The magnitude of the childhood asthma epidemic in Harlem in New York City and the commitment of engaged community partners led to an interdisciplinary, participatory, and multifaceted approach to the planning, implementation, and evaluation of the Harlem Children's Zone Asthma Initiative. Here we present the first year's data on environmental triggers in the homes of program participants, showing that intensive, community-based programs can reduce both home environmental triggers and adverse childhood asthma outcomes. This provides an example of a community-wide public health intervention that informs public policy and planning, and may provide a sustainable model for reducing childhood asthma in impoverished communities.

Asthma in New York City

Davis, L. E., Lee, J., Garg, R., Leighton, J., Goodman, A., Cohen, L., Morris, C., & Rome, M.

Publication year

2003

Journal title

Journal of Asthma

Volume

40

Page(s)

55-61

Asthma: the impact of policies on breathing easier

DesVignes-Kendrick, M., Nolen, J., McClendon, R. J., & Goodman, A.

Publication year

2002

Journal title

The Journal of law, medicine & ethics : a journal of the American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics

Volume

30

Issue

3

Page(s)

109-16
Abstract
Asthma's impact on health, quality of life, and the economy is substantial, and asthma rates are increasing. Currently, there is no way to prevent the initial onset of asthma, and there is no cure. However, people who have asthma can and do lead high quality, productive lives if they control their asthma by taking medication and, as appropriate, avoid contact with environmental "triggers." These environmental triggers include cockroaches, dust mites, furry pets, mold, tobacco smoke, and certain chemicals. This article provides an overview of the asthma epidemic in the United States and its impact on communities. It also discusses federal, state, and local obstacles and approaches to asthma control and provides examples of recent state legislation related to asthma and the key factors in their enactment.

Hearing the voice of the community above the din of the city: New york city turning point

Hubinsky, T., Cagan, E. R., Goodman, A., Deitcher, D., Page-Cook, S., & Cohen, N. L.

Publication year

2002

Journal title

Journal of Public Health Management and Practice

Volume

8

Issue

1

Page(s)

27-33

Developing injury prevention capacity in new york city: The Role of a Local Health Department in Fostering Collaborations

Hayes, R., Goodman, A., & Wilt, S.

Publication year

1997

Journal title

Journal of Public Health Management and Practice

Volume

3

Issue

6

Page(s)

25-29
Abstract
Injuries have long been a leading cause of mortality in urban areas such as New York City. While efforts to address injuries were undertaken by the New York City Department of Health (NYCDOH) starting in the 1940s, it was not until the department received a Capacity Building Grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 1989 that a more comprehensive program could be developed. The NYCDOH launched several collaborative projects with a variety of organizations and institutions. These efforts indicate that through collaborations, local health departments can increase their effectiveness and better promote their approach to injury prevention.

The epidemiology and causes of injuries resulting in hospitalisation in New York City: 1990-1992

Bijur, P. E., Wilt, S., Kurzon, M., Hayes, R., & Goodman, A.

Publication year

1997

Journal title

Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine: Journal of Urban Health

Volume

74

Issue

1

Page(s)

31-50
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to present data on the distribution and etiology of nonfatal injuries resulting in hospital discharges in .War York City (NYC). Records oj all NYC residents discharged far injuries from acute stay hospitals 1990-1992 were tabulated. Injuries from surgical and medical procedures, adverse effects of drugs in therapeutic use, and late effects of injury vere excluded. The results indicate that there was a marked geographic variation in rates: higher rates of assaults, self-inflicted injuries, burns, unintentional injuries from firearms, and injuries to bicyclists in disadvantaged neighborhoods. The data show that injuries in NYC have distinctive features that should form the basis for targeted prevention activities.

Lead exposure among automobile radiator repair workers and their children in New York city

Nunez, C. M., Klitzman, S., & Goodman, A.

Publication year

1993

Journal title

American Journal of Industrial Medicine

Volume

23

Issue

5

Page(s)

763-777
Abstract
Despite a comprehensive Occupational Safety and Health Administration lead standard, exposure to lead continues in many industries. This paper describes a blood lead screening and education program for automobile radiator repair workers and their families in New York City. Results showed that 67% of automobile radiator repair workers (n + 62) in 89% of the shops tested (n + 24) had blood lead levels in excess of 25 μg/dl. The vast majority of workers had never been tested previously, and none had received health and safety training regarding occupational lead exposure. Although none of the workers' children's blood lead levels were in excess of then‐current guidelines, several had levels which may be associated with subclinical toxicity and in excess of the revised Centers for Disease Control guidelines of 10 μg/dl. This project demonstrates that lead exposure in the automotive radiator repair industry continues to be widespread and that local health departments can assist in hazard identification and remediation. © 1993 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Mercury exposure from the repair of blood pressure machines in medical facilities

Goldberg, M., Klitzman, S., Payne, J. L., Nadig, R. J., McGrane, J. A., & Goodman, A. K.

Publication year

1990

Journal title

Applied Occupational and Environmental Hygiene

Volume

5

Issue

9

Page(s)

604-610
Abstract
Hospital employees who repair broken blood pressure machines or who work in areas where such machines are repaired are potentially at risk for mercury poisoning. To assess this risk, the extent of exposure and related health effects from this source were investigated in 13 hospitals. Ninety-three employees who repaired blood pressure machines, who cleaned the repair area, or who worked in the repair room participated in the project. A comprehensive industrial hygiene survey was conducted to assess mercury contamination. Occupational histories and symptoms of mercury poisoning was elicited from employee interviews, and mercury absorption were assessed via urine samples. The investigation showed that repair and cleanup of broken blood pressure machines were carried out with little programmatic attention having been paid to providing a safe environment. Employees were not trained in the hazards associated with mercury nor in proper handling of this material. In 6 of 13 facilities, the level of airborne mercury, measured over 10-second intervals with a real-time instrument, exceeded 50 Jlg/m3. The Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) set by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration is 50 pg/m3 as an 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA). Eleven of 86 employees who submitted urine samples had levels consistent with excess mercury absorption (> 19 μg/L). Of these, eight never or rarely repaired the blood pressure machines but worked in the repair room. To prevent future mercury exposure in this setting, a comprehensive health and safety program for the repair work was developed.

Potential exposure levels and health effects of neighborhood exposure to a municipal incinerator bottom ash landfill

Stern, A. H., Munshi, A. A., & Goodman, A. K.

Publication year

1989

Journal title

Archives of Environmental Health

Volume

44

Issue

1

Page(s)

40-48
Abstract
An investigation was conducted to assess the potential exposure levels and pursuant public health implications of neighborhood exposure to a municipal incinerator bottom ash landfill. This site received ash from a single incinerator without pollution control devices from 1954–1973. Soil was sampled for 10 heavy metals, polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodioxin and furan congeners, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Soil concentrations for these substances were converted to estimates of exposure, health effects, and/or cancer risk by the application of a general exposure model and exposure/effect and exposure/risk models for specific substances. The results of soil analysis and modeling indicate that the level of lead detected on the site was considerably above the recommended levels of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and may lead to an elevated blood lead level in exposed children above that currently defining a case of lead poisoning. The potential for health effects resulting from exposure to other substances measured in the soil on this site is considered to be small, and no significant increased cancer risk is expected. Comparison of levels of various substances obtained at this site with levels obtained in fresh bottom ash in other studies suggests that these results may be applicable to exposures from other municipal incinerator bottom ash landfills.

Rubella in the workplace: The need for employee immunization

Goodman, A. K., Friedman, S. M., Beatrice, S. T., & Bart, S. W.

Publication year

1987

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

77

Issue

6

Page(s)

725-726
Abstract
From 1983 to 1985, the New York City Department of Health investigated five workplace outbreaks of rubella. Approximately 40 per cent of the 265 cases were detected among women of child-bearing age (15-44 years). Data are reviewed from the 1983 Financial District outbreak to illustrate the continued susceptibility of young adults, the missed opportunities for rubella immunization, and the danger of congenital infection. A comprehensive rubella immunization program is required to protect pregnant women and eliminate congenital rubella. As one important component of this effort, employee health physicians are urged to assess the immune status of women of child-bearing age and to vaccinate all susceptibles who are not pregnant.

Emergency medicine for the house officer

Pousada, L., Osborn, H. H., & Goodman, A.

Publication year

1986

Rubella outbreak among office workers--New York City

Goodman, A., Friedman, S., & Schultz, S.

Publication year

1985

Journal title

MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Volume

34

Issue

29

Page(s)

455-9

Gastrointestinal illness among scuba divers--New York City

Goodman, A., & Schultz, S.

Publication year

1983

Journal title

MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Volume

32

Issue

44

Page(s)

576-7

Contact

ag4451@nyu.edu +1 (212) 992-7279 715 Broadway New York, NY 10003