Ana Abraido Lanza

Ana Abraido Lanza
Ana Abraido Lanza

Vice Dean of the College of Global Public Health

Professor of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Professional overview

Dr. Ana Abraído-Lanza research interests include studying the cultural, psychological, social, and structural factors that affect health, psychological well-being, and mortality among Latinos; health disparities between Latinos and non-Latino whites; and the health of immigrant Latinos.  Her major publications on the Latino mortality paradox and on acculturation have contributed to national and international debates on the mental and physical health of Latinos specifically, and on general factors that influence immigrant health.

Dr. Abraído-Lanza is engaged in several important professional activities.  These include (among others) serving on the Editorial Boards of Health Education and Behavior, the Annals of Behavioral Medicine, the International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, and Preventing Chronic Disease.  She has served as a committee or Board member on numerous scientific, professional and non-profit organizations and groups, including (among others) the Hispanic Serving Health Professions Schools, the Community Task Force on Preventive Services of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and several National Institutes of Health review groups.  

Prior to joining NYU, Dr. Abraído-Lanza was Professor of Sociomedical Sciences at the Mailman School of Public Health of Columbia University.   She was the director of the Initiative for Maximizing Student Development (IMSD) at Columbia’s Mailman School, an education project funded by the National Institutes of Health, which aims to increase the number of under-represented researchers who enter biomedical and behavioral research careers in the field of public health.  Dr. Abraído-Lanza’s honors and awards include being selected as a Columbia University Provost Leadership Fellow.   She also received a Teaching Excellence Award from the Mailman School of Public Health of Columbia University, a Dalmas A. Taylor Distinguished Contributions Award from the Minority Fellowship Program of the American Psychological Association, and the Student Assembly Public Health Mentoring Award from the American Public Health Association.

Education

BA, Psychology, New York University, New York, NY
MA, Psychology, City University of New York, New York, NY
PhD, Psychology, City University of New York, New York, NY
Postdoctoral Fellow, Columbia University, New York, NY

Areas of research and study

Acculturation
Behavioral Determinants of Health
Behavioral Science
Community Health
Cultural Determinants of Health
Health of Marginalized Population
Latino culture
Latino Health
Minorities
Minority Health
Population Health
Psychology
Social Behaviors
Social Determinants of Health

Publications

Publications

Are you better off? Perceptions of social mobility and satisfaction with care among Latina immigrants in the U.S.

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Acculturation and physical activity among Latinos

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Community engagement in academic health centers: A model for capturing and advancing our successes

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Personalized medicine and Hispanic health: Improving health outcomes and reducing health disparities

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Segmented assimilation: An approach to studying acculturation and obesity among Latino adults in the United States

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Social Norms, Acculturation, and Physical Activity Among Latina Women

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The Intersection of Fatalismo and pessimism on depressive symptoms and suicidality of Mexican descent adolescents: An attribution perspective

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Revisiting unequal treatment

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The joint contribution of neighborhood poverty and social integration to mortality risk in the United States

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The Power of Place: Social Network Characteristics, Perceived Neighborhood Features, and Psychological Distress Among African Americans in the Historic Hill District in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

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Breast Cancer Screening Among Dominican Latinas: A Closer Look at Fatalism and Other Social and Cultural Factors

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Effect of physical activity, social support, and skills training on late-life emotional health: A systematic literature review and implications for public health research

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How Neighborhood Poverty Structures Types and Levels of Social Integration

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Havens of risks or resources? A study of two Latino neighborhoods in New York City

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Religion, fatalism, and cancer control: A qualitative study among Hispanic Catholics

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Clashing paradigms: An empirical examination of cultural proxies and socioeconomic condition shaping Latino health

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Secular trends in the association between nativity/length of US residence with body mass index and waist circumference among Mexican-Americans, 1988-2008

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Religion, religiosity, and spirituality

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Satisfaction with health care among Latinas

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Effectiveness of multicomponent programs with community mobilization for reducing alcohol-impaired driving

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Fatalism or destiny? A qualitative study and interpretative framework on Dominican women's breast cancer beliefs

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Religion and mental health among minorities and immigrants in the United States

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The effectiveness of worksite nutrition and physical activity interventions for controlling employee overweight and obesity: A systematic review

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Client-directed interventions to increase community access to breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening a systemic review

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Interventions to increase recommendation and delivery of screening for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancers y healthcare providers systematic reviews of provider assessment and feedback and provider incentives

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