MPH Course Descriptions

GPH-GU 2382 A Systems Approach to Food Access (3)
Varies
Pre-requisites: none

This course provides a systems approach to increase students' abilities to respond to global health threats in food and nutrition. Multiple public health disciplines are emphasized, including: nutrition epidemiology; behavioral health/ intervention research; health economics; and health policy & management to provide students with a knowledge base and foundation of skills to design and implement strategies in health and global food systems. The overall approach is to integrate community participatory models into a systems discussion. Further, the course will include both case studies and skills- building exercises to apply various techniques of skills-based learning.


GPH-GU 5220 Accelerating Progress Towards Health-Related SDGs (3 credits)
Spring
Pre-requisite: none

This course provides an overview of the state-of-the-art concerning the Global Burden of Disease, the Disease Control Priorities, Universal Health Coverage and Health Systems Analyses. Students apply systems thinking and evaluation methods in designing policies to accelerate progress toward the health related Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), by categorizing health related targets within the SDGs according to mortality, incidence/prevalence of disease, risk factors, cost effective interventions and health system platforms. For each of these dimensions, students analyze concepts, methods, information sources and existing data for countries with differing burdens of disease.


GPH-GU 2430 Advanced Health and Human Rights (3)
Spring
Pre-requisite: GPH-GU 2250

This course will build on the introductory Health and Human Rights course by focusing on advanced topics, methodologies and debates in the field. Through a case studies approach and group projects, students will weigh the relative costs and benefits of using a rights-based approach in a public health context, as well as explore how public health policies, programs and practices can impact human rights. Students will acquire an in-depth knowledge of international human rights as applied to public health through real-world application.  Topics covered include current issues in health and human rights, program planning based on a health and human rights-based approach, as well as an examination of different methodologies to investigate and understand the interactions of epidemics, public health and human rights. In addition, as the culminating experience in the Health and Human Rights Certificate Program, students will write a 15-20 grant proposal on a health and human rights intervention or research study (due at the end of the Certificate term) and present on this topic at the end of the course.

GPH-GU 9202 Aging, Health, and the Environment: A Global Perspective (3)
Summer
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2140 or 5140

Based in NYU Florence, this course will contrast U.S. and international approaches to aging, health, and environmental risk. The world population is growing older: by 2050 the global population of those over 60 years old will reach nearly 2 billion. Italy, in particular, has the largest proportion (21.4%) of elderly citizens in all of Europe. There are several environmental risk factors that affect the aging process, including disasters, climate change, and pollutants. We will cover theories and principles of gerontology, climate change, disasters, and the built environment with the goal of understanding how environmental risk factors shape the aging process. Lastly, we will consider how Italian approaches to aging and health, including those of policymakers and local stakeholders, differ from the U.S. model.

GPH-GU 2368 Applied Survival Analysis (3)
Spring
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2920 or GPH-GU 2353

This course will provide an introduction to the analysis of survival data, i.e., data subject to incomplete observation due to censoring.  Topics include estimation via the Kaplan Meier estimator, comparison of survival data via the log rank and related tests, and regression modeling of survival data using the Cox proportional hazards model and accelerated failure time model.  Parametric modeling of survival data will also be covered.  Additional topics may include left truncation, competing risks, and study design.  Students may select any software package to use for assignments; examples in Stata, SAS and R will be provided.  Assignments will involve analysis of survival data from Public Health and biomedical studies.

GPH-GU 2355 Analysis of Epidemiologic Data Using SAS (3)
Spring
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2353 and GPH-GU 2106 or 5106

Public health research and practice often require the use of statistical software to analyze data. This course is designed to give students practical and direct experience with using Statistical Analysis System (SAS®) software to analyze public health-related data. Throughout the course, students will work with a data set and learn how to generate descriptive, bivariable, and multivariable statistics. They will also gain additional skills in organizing statistical findings in tables and figures and instruction in writing Methods and Results sections, similar in style to those presented in peer-reviewed journal articles. These skills will prepare students for future analytic projects by strengthening their analytic capacity and building expertise in a well-known, versatile statistical program used both in all areas of public health practice.

GPH-GU 2218 Assessing Community Health Needs & Resources (3)
Fall
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2106 or 5106, GPH-GU 2995 or 5995, and GPH-GU 2361

Community health assessments comprehensively identify the assets and needs of a defined group. When conducted in tandem with community members, community health assessments provide a window into how a community sees itself, the systems and patterns it functions by, and its assets and needs. Public health practitioners can use this information to work with a community to utilize its strengths to address mutually acknowledged weaknesses (or needs). In this course, you will work in teams to conduct a community assessment of an assigned community district within a global region.   You will use systems thinking, secondary data (public data sets) and primary data (surveys, in-depth interviews, observations) to describe your community, it’s health, and socio-economic status.

GPH-GU 2325 Behavioral and Communication Strategies for Global Epidemics (3)
Varies
Pre-requisites: none

This course focuses on the integration of three public health disciplines for emergency action: epidemiology, behavioral health/intervention research, and public health communication to provide students with a knowledge base and foundation of skills to be able to design and implement strategies in disease prevention and response in outbreak situations, with a focus on the reemergence and emergence of global epidemics.

GPH-GU 5025 Bioethical Issues in Society (3)
Spring semester
Pre-requisites: none

This course will provide an in‐depth exploration of the field of bioethics. Through historical examples, case studies, and cases upon which Professor Caplan was asked to consult as a leading bioethicist, students will study a range of bioethical challenges and conflicts. These conflicts include those confronted by individuals, families, health care providers and policy makers. Students will also examine and discuss pivotal decisions many of which affect both life and death related to medical treatments and interventions, research, and policy decisions.

GPH-GU 2995 Biostatistics for Public Health (3)
Fall and Spring
Pre-requisites: none
This course covers basic probability, descriptive and inferential statistics, and the role of biostatistics in the practice of public health. Specific attention will be given to common probability distributions in public health and medicine, t-tests, Analysis of Variance, multiple linear and logistic regression, categorical data analysis, and survival analysis. Statistical topics are presented conceptually with little derivation, and applications are demonstrated using common statistical software.

GPH-GU 5240 Budgeting for Sustainable Health Returns on Investment (3)
Spring
Pre-requisites: none
This course develops budget and resource management competencies and skills. Students will identify, apply and evaluate existing methods and tools that were developed and implemented by World Bank, UNICEF, WHO and other agencies to support analysis of additional costs, health returns on investment, budget requirements and fiscal sustainability in a specific country context. Case studies, readings and datasets are based on real life applications to budgeting and resource management for health service coverage and health systems in low and mid income countries. Students will select and apply methods to synthesize additional costs, health returns on investment, budgets, and sustainable financing options for universal coverage and health system performance.

GPH-GU 2621 Capstone I: Practice & Integrative Learning Experiences (2)
Fall
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2106 or 5106, GPH-GU 2995 or 5995, and GPH-GU 2140 or 5140
The  course  serves  as  the  culminating  experience  for  MPH  students  and  provides  an  opportunity  for  students  to demonstrate  the  acquisition  of  fundamental  public  health  competencies  while  working  as  interdisciplinary  teams  on  a project  with an  international  or  US-based  health  organization.  During  the  year,  students  are  expected  to research  and refine  the  problem  proposed  by  the  organization;  develop  an  explicit  working  agreement  governing  the  scope  and deliverables  of  the  project;  collect  data  and  conduct  analyses  relevant  to  the  project;  and  prepare  a  final  report  in written and oral form.

GPH-GU 2622 Capstone II: Practice & Integrative Learning Experiences (2)
Spring semester
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2621

The  course  serves  as  the  culminating  experience  for  MPH  students  and  provides  an  opportunity  for  students  to demonstrate  the  acquisition  of  fundamental  public  health  competencies  while  working  as  interdisciplinary  teams  on  a project  with  an  international  or  US-based  health  organization.  During  the  year,  students  are  expected  to research  and refine  the  problem  proposed  by  the  organization;  develop  an  explicit  working  agreement  governing  the  scope  and deliverables  of  the  project;  collect  data  and  conduct  analyses  relevant  to  the  project;  and  prepare  a  final  report  in written and oral form.

GPH-GU 2265 Climate Change and Global Public Health (3)
Spring  
Pre-requisite: none

This course is about Climate Change i.e. Global Warming! Climate Change has been cited as the most significant public policy challenge of the 21st century. We will intensively cover the climate change science, public health impacts, ecological consequences, fossil fuel air pollution, global food and security, and policy options. Adaptation strategies to control outcomes of storm flooding, increased ozone and heat waves, drought, and threats to biodiversity will be covered. Mitigation by 100% renewables with texts on wind and solar energy will be assessed.  Policy solutions will be evaluated from city governments, States, Countries, to Global treaties such as UN Framework Convention on Climate Change-Conference of the Parties Paris Agreement. Climate Denialism is reviewed with the text, ”The Madhouse Effect.

GPH-GU 2415 Community-Based Health Interventions (3)
Spring  
Pre-requisite: GPH-GU 2140 or 5140

Community-based  health  interventions  are  a major  public  health  strategy  for  promoting population health.  This course provides an introduction to the foundations of community-based health interventions and the factors influencing their design, implementation, evaluation, and outcomes. Using social ecological   and   community-based   participatory   frameworks,   key principles   and   strategies underlying community-based health interventions are examined. Successful community-based strategies for addressing  various  public  health  issues  are  assessed. Challenges to  implementing,  evaluating  and sustaining  successful  community-based  health interventions,  and  implications  for  promoting  health equity are discussed.

GPH-GU 2316 Community Health: A Society in Transition: South Africa (6)
Summer  
Pre-requisites: none

Explore how political change has affected health care access and policy in South Africa. Immersed in the work of social advocacy groups and health NGOs, you’ll visit rural areas and meet local families, learning about HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention programs from a rural perspective. In the process, you’ll gain an understanding of the country’s priority regions in reproductive health and infectious diseases.

GPH-GU 2321 Cost Effectiveness Analysis for Public Health (1.5)
Spring
Pre-requisite: GPH-GU 2430

Policymakers,  faced  with  competing health priorities  and  limited  resources,  routinely  make difficult but necessary decisions. Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) is increasingly considered in public  health  decision  making  to set  priorities  among  competing  interventions, programs  and policies  that  aim  to  promote  health  and  health  equity  and  inform  investment  and  disinvestment decisions in the health sector. Suited for MPH and PhD students, this 1.5-credit course provides an introduction to CEA—the most applied method in health economic evaluation—and covers its theoretical foundations, methodological principles and real-world applications over 7 weeks. Through lectures, discussions, and assignments, students will build their technical knowledge and skills  to  conduct  and  critique  CEA studies  and  take  part  in  discussions  of  planned  cost-effectiveness research.

GPH-GU 5380 Data-Driven Decision-Making in Global Public Health (3)
Fall
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2106 or 5106

This course develops skills and competencies in making data-driven decisions to improve global public health outcomes, especially in high disease-burden environments. It is based on a framework of enabling environment, supply, demand, and quality factors that affect the effective coverage of services that would prevent outcomes such as under-5 mortality, neonatal mortality, and maternal mortality. The class will introduce decision support platforms developed by UNICEF, WHO, and the World Bank that help public health professionals choose between available strategies and interventions in a high burden country to reduce adverse health outcomes.

GPH-GU 2320 Data Utilization in Public Health Practice (3)
Fall
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2995 or 5995 and GPH-GU 2106 or 5106

Public health practice typically demands competencies in identifying, extracting, analyzing, interpreting and disseminating information from large surveys, administrative data sets, government reports, qualitative studies, and other data sources. This course will develop these competencies through rigorous evaluation of existing data resources (including their strengths and limitations for answering specific public health questions) and best practices in data utilization for situational assessment; monitoring; policy, program and strategy development; and surveillance of health outcomes through real-world case studies and assignments. The course will also provide students with basic skills in data analysis and visualization using Microsoft Excel and an interactive, online mapping software (Carto)

 

GPH-GU 2294 Designing and Managing Organizations in Public Health (3)
Spring
Pre-requisite: GPH-GU 2112 or 5112

This course has two overall goals. The first is to increase your effectiveness in leading individuals and teams within and across organizations, sectors and agencies that seek to improve public health. The course’s second goal is to prepare you to effectively design organizations and master organizational processes to impact population health. This course prepares to achieve your objectives by providing you with fundamental frameworks and tools developed from the behavioral and social sciences and tested by leaders in organizations across the public, non-profit, and for-profit sectors.

 

GPH-GU 2232 Detection and Control of Waterborne Pathogens (3)
Spring
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2190 or 5190
Waterborne pathogens are the etiologies of a range of diseases –including gastroenteritis, poliomyelitis, hepatitis, Legionnaire’s disease, and intestinal worm infections –and play an important role in the global burden of disease. This course will introduce students to fundamental principles of water-related infectious diseases, including the detection and enumeration of waterborne pathogens and indicator microorganisms; the burden of disease and mode of transmission of different classes of microorganisms; pathogenesis; and engineering controls to reduce transmission. The course will have a global perspective, and include water treatment options in low-resource settings.

 

GPH-GU 5150 Emergency Preparedness for Healthcare Organizations (3)
Summer
Pre-requisites: none

The healthcare system is uniquely challenged by large-scale disasters, which are on the increase in the United States and throughout the world.  Every setting of healthcare, from hospitals to outpatient clinics may be affected by acute emergencies and disaster events.  Therefore, as public health professionals, healthcare professionals, emergency managers, or other professionals in charge of ensuring a safe patient care environment, it is essential to become familiar with the current disaster management paradigm (mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery) as it pertains to the healthcare environment.  This course is designed to provide students with disaster management capabilities that will have applicability in their current or future  employment.

 

GPH-GU 2440 Emerging Diseases and Bioterrorism (3)
Fall
Pre-requisite: GPH-GU 2106 or 5106

The emergence of new pathogens and drug resistance, as well as increased transmission opportunities caused by human migration, political instability, and breakdown of healthcare infrastructure, has led to rising incidence of novel infectious diseases. This course aims to provide training in the basic biology, epidemiology, and control of these emerging diseases. It will provide the necessary skills to analyze the interplay between human host, pathogen, and environment in both evolutionary ecology and statistical epidemiology frameworks, and will include discussions of Darwinian medicine. Specific bioterrorism pathogens will be addressed, as will methods of identification, and predictive modeling of a bioterrorism incident. In addition to lectures, class time will include practical data handling. Discussion of both methodological and substantive journal articles from recent literature will be led by students.

 

GPH-GU 2106 Epidemiology (3)
Fall and Spring  
Pre-requisites: none

Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of health and disease in different human populations and the application of methods to improve disease outcomes. As such, epidemiology is the basic science of public health.  This course is designed to introduce students in all fields of public health to the background, basic principles and methods of public health epidemiology. Topics covered in this course include: basic principles of epidemiology; measures of disease frequency; epidemiologic study designs: experimental and observational; bias; confounding; outbreak investigations; screening; causality; and ethical issues in epidemiologic research.  In addition, students will develop skills to read, interpret and evaluate health information from published epidemiologic studies. 

 

GPH-GU 2930 Epidemiology Methods and Design (3)
Fall
Pre-requisite: GPH-GU 2450

This course will cover in-depth, advanced methods for modern epidemiologic study design, sampling, quantitative measurement, including reliability and validity, and statistical analysis appropriate for selected study designs relevant to global health research and practice. Considerations regarding the responsible conduct of research in international settings will be integrated throughout the course. This doctoral-level lecture/seminar course is offered to graduate students with a basic knowledge of epidemiologic and biostatistical principles, including causal inference, standard study design, confounding, bias, validity, and commonly-used analytical methods.

GPH-GU 2190 Essentials of Public Health Biology (3)
Semester: Fall
Pre-requisites: none

This course introduces MPH students to the biological and molecular context of public health. The course provides an overview of: a) basic biological principles and mechanisms relevant to public health practice; and b) biomedical technology as applied in public health. The course covers basic principles of genetics, immunology, microbiology, and cell biology in the context of global public health. Areas covered include infectious diseases, genetic and chronic diseases, environmental factors affecting health, and prevention and treatment strategies.

 

GPH-GU Financial Management for Public, Nonprofit, and Health Organizations (3)
Cross-listed with CORE-GP 1021
Fall, Spring, Summer
Pre-requisites: none

In this core course in financial management, students will learn the fundamentals of budgeting and accounting for public, health, and not-for-profit organizations. Through readings, lectures, real-world case studies, and assignments, students will gain an understanding of how to use financial information in organizational planning, implementation, control, reporting, and analysis. In addition, students will have the chance to develop their spreadsheet skills by using Excel to perform financial calculations and create financial documents.

GPH-GU 2217 Food Policy in Public Health (3)
Fall
Pre-requisites: none

The food system plays an essential role in public health by implicating nutrition, safety, environmental concerns, and sustainability. Food and its many aspects has become a mainstay of public health policy, popular discourse, and national debate.  This course examines current health policy issues related to the modern food environment locally, nationally and internationally. The course provides background into how the U.S. government (federal, state, and local) can act in the area of food policy and it delves into topics related to nutritional guidelines, food programs, food safety, labeling, marketing, and pricing. We will additionally explore issues related to the food industry, the global nutrition transition, and agricultural and environmental food production concerns.

 

GPH-GU 2120 Foundations of Global Health (3)
Fall semester
Pre-requisites: none

This course prepares students to critically examine public health issues from a global perspective. It will guide students to understand how processes of socioeconomic development and globalization influence the health of populations throughout the world. It will present the state of the art in addressing global health problems and introduce you to the primary actors involved in setting global health policies and the architecture of global health governance and financing. The course will also touch upon the human rights and ethical dimensions of global public health, including conflicts between individuals, communities, and nations.

 

GPH-GU 2015 Genomics and Global Public Health (3)
Spring
Pre-requisites: none
Cross-listed with BIOL-GA 2015
This course describes the developing relationship between genomics and genomic technologies with the health of populations in a global context. Topics covered include genomic technologies and their applications, genetic epidemiology, the human microbiome, infectious disease genomics, and the ethical, legal and social implications of genomics. The course consists of lectures, group discussions focused on current scientific papers, guest seminars, and a hands-on sequencing workshop. Students will leave the course with an increased awareness of how sequencing of microbes, parasites and human genomes helps develop better diagnostics and therapies and a greater understanding of human health globally.

 

GPH-GU 2410 Global Burden of Infectious Disease (3)
Fall  
Pre-requisites: none

Infectious diseases, especially HIV, tuberculosis, malaria, and acute respiratory infections, contribute substantially to the global burden of disease. This course will focus on the biology, epidemiology and control of these and other critical infectious diseases. This is essential training for practitioners of global public health. Using the framework of the Millennium Development Goals, and their successors, the Sustainable Development Goals, the class will explore the prevalence and burden of the “big three,” along with certain neglected tropical diseases, Hepatitis viruses, and water-borne and vector-borne infectious diseases.  The course will also cover successful, completed, and ongoing infectious disease eradication campaigns, and discuss why these are necessary to promote and ensure global health equity.  It will conclude with a unit on public health approaches to infectious disease, touching on historic and current practices, and future projections of global infectious disease burden. 

 

GPH-GU 9278 Global Cancer Epidemiology: A Focus in Nutritional Risk Factors (3)
Spring
Pre-requisites: none

Cancer is a major public health concern globally, surpassing rates of cardiovascular disease in adults <75 years. It is a multifactorial disease with genetic, environmental and modifiable lifestyle risk factors. This course provides an overview of: a) the global and national burden of cancer; b) risk factors including genetic, early life risk factors and modifiable factors: tobacco, excess adiposity and diet (carbohydrates, processed foods, sugar-sweetened beverages, and alcohol); and c) cancer surveillance and policy as it relates to primary and secondary prevention of cancer. Students will discuss landmark studies in cancer epidemiology with an emphasis on population studies in the US and Europe. Students will also gain an understanding of cancer biology and important mechanisms that underlie carcinogenesis.

 

GPH-GU 2153 Global Environmental Health (3) – equivalent to GPH-GU 5153
Fall and Spring  
Pre-requisites: none

Environmental health sciences represent the study of biological, physical, and chemical agents that affect the health of both communities and workers. This course provides students with an introduction to key areas of environmental health. Students gain an understanding of the interaction of individuals and communities with their environment, the impact of environmental agents on human health, and specific applications of concepts of environmental health including exposure assessment and engineering controls. The impact of global environmental issues on health equity will be considered, as well as scientific, political, legal, and economic perspectives on global environmental health. Emphasis is placed on issues in environmental health that transcend national boundaries.

 

GPH-GU 2315 Global Health and Economic Development (3)
Fall
Pre-requisites: none

An introduction to the issues of health and health care on a global basis. The course focuses on nature and scope of major worldwide health problems and the study of different national and international approaches to their solution.

 

GPH-GU 5171 Global Health Informatics Workshop (0)

Fall and Summer

Pre-requisites: none
Public Health Informatics is a fairly new field that is concerned with the systematic application of information and computer sciences to practice, research and learning. This course is created to ensure that graduates of the program have working knowledge of information resources available for program planning, surveillance and data management and working knowledge in the use of evidence-based public health information tools that ensure use of current best practices and for lifelong learning.

 

GPH-GU 5210 Global Health Disaster Preparedness and Response (3)
Fall or Spring
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2016 or 5106

Large-scale disasters and catastrophes, also referred to as mega-disasters or hyper-complex emergencies, are of such magnitude that they affect an entire country-either directly or indirectly and require national or international response capabilities to recover. Incidents or events such as pandemics and climate change that impact more than one country or region are also considered global disasters. In this course, students will define and characterize major catastrophic threats, assess data for mitigation purposes, conduct risk assessments for public health impact and structural and non-structural damages, identify recovery strategies and assess role of memorialization on community recovery. Students will prepare an Emergency Operations Plan and appropriate plan annexes.

 

GPH-GU Global Health Governance and Management (3)
Fall
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2110 or 5110 and GPH-GU 2112 or 5112
Cross-listed with HPAM-GP 2244

After discussing definitions of health in international agreements and the general influences of globalization on health and health equity, the course will explore the roles and responsibilities of national health leadership, primarily Ministries of Health and governmental institutions, in assuring the health of their populations and the different strategies and variable capacities of national governments in developed, developing and countries in transition. The role of regional and local governments, professionals, civil society, communities and individuals, will also be explored.

 

GPH-GU 5171 Global Health Informatics Workshop (0)
Fall  
Pre-requisites: none

Public Health Informatics is a fairly new field that is concerned with the systematic application of information and computer sciences to practice, research and learning. This course is created to ensure that graduates of the program have working knowledge of information resources available for program planning, surveillance and data management and working knowledge in the use of evidence-based public health information tools that ensure use of current best practices and for lifelong learning

GPH-GU 2342 Global Issues in Public Health Nutrition: Obesity and Diabetes (3)
January term
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2106 or 5106

This course will discuss these nutrition-related chronic diseases in country. Students will learn the epidemiology of these diseases in the context of the country. In an experiential learning setting, students will observe and discuss the major determinants of these diseases, including the food landscape, health policy, population dietary patterns and the health care system. This will be achieved through a combination of lectures, guest speakers’ seminars and field trips to various sited including hospitals and local markets. Students will concurrently learn about the ongoing population research studies on these chronic diseases being conducted at the Public Health Institute, and gain a thorough understanding of the epidemiologic methods used.

GPH-GU 2140 Global Issues in Social & Behavioral Health (3)
Fall and Spring
Pre-requisites: none

This course begins by examining social, psychological, and cultural factors that have an impact on public health in community, national, and global contexts. These factors include population characteristics, individual beliefs and behaviors, and policies that affect public health problems and their solutions. The second half of the course introduces students to methods that public health professionals use to address the social and behavioral determinants of health. These methods include theories and perspectives drawn from the social/behavioral sciences, interventions and policies designed to alleviate health disparities, and methods to evaluate interventions and disseminate the results.

GPH-GU 2230 Global Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology and Control (3)
Spring
Pre-requisites: none

This course will focus on the considerable and increasing burden of disease due to chronic diseases, mental health, substance use (alcohol, tobacco, other drugs), risk factors (obesity, lack of physical activity), and injuries within the developing world. It will present methods for measuring the burden of non-communicable disease, review approaches to program and service development to modify risk factors, present lessons learned from successful developing country programs, and discuss implications for health services development and international development policies.

 

 

 

GPH-GU 2312 Global Perspectives on Reproductive Health & Human Rights (3)
Fall or Spring
Pre-requisites: none

This course examines reproductive health from a human rights perspective both nationally and internationally. After a review of the intersection of reproductive health and human rights, topics to be covered include: the demographic transition and declining birth rates; the rights of women with HIV infection and other vulnerable populations; men's influence on reproductive rights; viewing traditional practices through a human rights lens; and current reproductive rights in the USA.

 

GPH-GU 2226 Global Toxicology and Community Health (3)
Fall
Pre-requisites: none

This course uses a multidisciplinary approach to examine the global health impacts of environmental toxicants with particular focus on disparities in reproductive and developmental health, child health, mental health, and public health at the community level. Students will explore the numerous ways that environmental contaminants can have toxic effects on health in low-income communities in the US and in developing nations. This course will identify and discuss global and US laws and regulations regarding toxicant exposures. The first portion of the course will focus on general aspects of toxicology. The second half of the course will focus more on applying what has been learned to real-life situations.

 

GPH-GU 2285 Global Women’s Health Programs – Analyzing the Evidence to Improve Women’s Lives (3)
Spring  
Pre-requisites: none

This course introduces the student to the major health issues facing women in low resource countries and how to analyze existing programs geared towards improving women’s health. Students will learn how biological, environmental, and societal issues affect women’s health, the outcomes of pregnancy, and child survival. Topics include reproductive and obstetric health, women’s rights, gender-based violence, access to health education, family planning, female genital cutting, and the public health interventions proven to positively impact these issues. Students will intensively evaluate and analyze the interventions created to improve the lives of women and identify key elements that constitute an effective global women’s health program. Students will learn the necessary skills to generate solutions to the complex circumstances affecting the health of women globally.

 

GPH-GU 2205 Gun Violence in America: Public Health, Politics, and Pragmatism (3)
Fall
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2106 or 5106 (suggested)

More U.S. residents have been killed with guns since 1968 than died in all the wars since the country’s founding. Addressing this crisis means solving tenacious public health problems in the realms of science and of politics. In this course we will review the epidemiology of gun violence and the empirical foundations of efforts to address it through policy, study design, programmatic interventions, and physical design. We will consider obstacles to the rigorous study of gun violence as well as the innovative approaches researchers have adopted to overcome them, whether in the fields of epidemiology, medicine, criminology, or economics. And we will place all of this in the political and legal context that shapes our collective actions. Through lectures and discussion, students will become familiar with the main factors connected with firearm injury, the study of gun violence, the policy actors that have influenced the U.S. response to date, and the underlying beliefs and behaviors that define the U.S. relationship with guns.

GPH-GU 2250 Health and Human Rights (3)
Fall
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2110 or 5110

This course provides basic understanding of modern human rights and their links to public health, including core principles, key documents, institutions and practices. It examines the close relationship between public health approach and human rights principles and the synergy effect of the combined analytical framework that can greatly enhance our understanding of global health and justice issues and development of comprehensive policy framework to address such issues.

 

GPH-GU 2110 Health Care Policy (1.5)
Fall and Spring

Pre-requisites: none
This course introduces students to key concepts, principles and practices in the field of health policy in the United States and other national health systems. The course will examine issues that concern quality, costs, access to healthcare and public health services for individuals and populations. The course emphasizes the need for leaders in today's world of public health to understand central issues in health policy. The overall goal of the course is to provide information for students to build an understanding of the fundamental ideas, issues, and problems currently debated in health policy and to provide a foundation for practice in a range of careers in public health and health care policy.

 

GPH-GU 2405 Health Communications: Changing Social Norms in Theory and Practice (3)
Spring semester
Pre-requisites: none

This course provides an introduction to the theory, design, implementation, and evaluation of health communication programs. Several resources are used to allow students to acquire practical knowledge and skills in health communications planning and implementation. Case studies, resources, research tools and examples of different media channels are reviewed and analyzed to explore how to reach different target audiences with the most effective health communication interventions.

 

GPH-GU Health Economics: Principles (1.5)
Fall, Spring
Pre-requisite:
Cross-listed with HPAM-GP 4830

This course provides the core microeconomic theories and concepts needed to understand health and health care issues in both the developed and developing world. It describes how the markets for health and health services are different from other goods, with a particular emphasis on the role of government and market failure. In addition it discusses the theoretical and empirical aspects of key health economics issues, including the demand for health and health services, supply side concerns, health insurance, the provision of public goods, and related topics. The course encourages students to fundamentally and rigorously examine the role of the market for the provision of health and health services and how public policy can influence these markets.

 

GPH-GU 2348 Healthcare Information Technology (1.5)
Fall
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2110 or 5110
Cross-listed with HPAM-GP 4822

This course describes the growing involvement of government in stimulating and directing the development of information technology in healthcare organizations. Included is a discussion of attempts to exchange information for the purposes of improving the quality of personal healthcare and public health. Methods for determining the financial value of information technology are described. Techniques for insuring the security and privacy of health information are presented. How information systems and technology can improve the quality of service provided to consumers and the clinical quality of health care is examined.

 

GPH-GU 5120 HIV/AIDS from a Global Perspective (3)
Spring
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2106 or 5106 and GPH-GU 2140 or 5140

Students will examine the evolution of the HIV epidemic globally throughout the last four decades.  Using a public health lens with an emphasis on population-based health promotion strategies and responses of health systems, students will examine different evolutions and manifestations of the epidemic in Africa, Eastern Europe/Asia, and the United States/Western Europe. Students will learn about the history of the disease within a global context; the biomedical aspects of the disease; including HIV testing, and treatment; the epidemiology of the disease; the socio-bio-behavioral drivers of the disease; and HIV/AIDS public health policies and calls to action around the globe. Theoretical paradigms and research drawn from public health will require students to examine, analyze, apply, and evaluate the interrelated disciplines of HIV prevention, treatment, and care across all segments of the population. The course utilizes a biopsychosocial framework for understanding illness and health promotion and emphasizes theory-based HIV prevention and care.

 

GPH-GU 2343 HIV/AIDS Public Health Promotion (3) (equivalent to GPH-GU 9343)
January term
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2106 or 5106 and GPH-GU 2140 or 5140

In this course, students will: gain an understanding of the key historical development, both nationally and globally, that have shaped the HIV epidemic within the United States (U.S.) and the United Kingdom (U.K.) over the last four decades; examine factors associated with HIV vulnerability in both settings; compare approaches for the implementation and availability of widespread HIV testing and treatment; and compare HIV-related public health policies within and across both countries. Finally, the course employs an experiential learning approach where students will visit local AIDS service organizations, and health care facilities to gain insights and first hand experience with the delivery of HIV prevention and intervention efforts in the U.K.

 

GPH-GU 2450 Intermediate Epidemiology (3)
Fall and Spring
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2106 or 5106

This course will develop an understanding of epidemiologic concepts and methods that will be a backbone to in depth training in specialty areas. It will provide a technical and conceptual training in study design, multivariate analysis, sample size calculations and other key epidemiologic techniques. It will build on the basic core course. This course is the second course in a three course sequence on the theory and practice of epidemiology and is intended for masters-and doctoral-level students. The course consists of two components: lecture and lab sessions. Lectures will cover key epidemiologic methods and concepts in greater detail. Lab sessions will include review and practice of fundamental data analytic techniques employing STATA.

 

GPH-GU 2359 Internship I: Applied Practice Experience Seminar (2)
Fall
Pre-requisites: 23 credits

This course complements the internship applied practice experience by providing a structured and supportive environment to reinforce the internship goals of developing public health competencies, gaining valuable work experience, and cultivating professionalism. Students complete the internship in the summer or fall of their final year in the program, and enroll in the course in the fall. The internship and course fulfill the Applied Practice Experience requirement for the following MPH concentrations: Community Health Science & Practice, Environmental Health Sciences, Global Health, Health Policy, Management, and Public Health Nutrition.

 

GPH-GU 2360 Internship II: Practice & Integrative Learning Experiences (4)
Spring
Pre-requisite: GPH-GU 2359

A  key goal of the MPH program is to enable students to synthesize principles, concepts, and competencies learned through coursework and the Applied Practice Experience. This course provides a structured and supportive environment to help students achieve this goal and to develop professionalism. Students prepare a professional report, poster, and critical reflection paper, comprising the MPH culminating experience. Students enroll in the course in their final spring semester. The course fulfills   the culminating experience requirement for the following MPH concentrations: Community Health Science & Practice, Environmental Health Sciences, Global Health, Public Health Policy & Management, and Public Health Nutrition.

 

GPH-GU 2940 Intervention and Prevention Science (3)
Spring semester
Pre-requisites: none

This doctoral-level course provides students with a set of conceptual frameworks for understanding health promotion and disease prevention strategies. Students review critical elements in planning, implementation, and evaluation of intervention strategies to improve individual and community health using mixed-methods; and apply this knowledge through the development of an R21 proposal.

 

GPH-GU 2152 Introduction to Agent-Based Modeling (3)
Fall or Spring
Pre-requisites: none
How do local (micro-scale) interactions between individuals generate global (macro-scale) societal patterns--of disease, of conflict, of inequality? Agent-based modeling (ABM) is a powerful new way to address such questions computationally. In ABMs, software individuals and the interactions between them are explicitly represented, and these local interactions generate the global patterns we wish to explain, and to alter through policy, epidemics being prime examples. This course introduces students to ABMs from epidemiology, public health, and social science. It teaches students without prior programming experience to build, analyze, extend, test, and present simple models in NetLogo.

 

GPH-GU 2286 Introduction to Data Management and Statistical Computing (3)
Spring
Pre-requisites: none
There is a gap between data collection and statistical analysis. Data management and manipulation is an essential component of public health practice necessary to fill this gap. The course will focus on command-based programming for modifying and managing data, and developing processes, procedures and documentation for reproducibility and efficiency. By the end of the course students will be able to comfortably create datasets, access existing datasets, create variables, clean data, merge data sets, create samples from larger data sets, label data and variables, create and debug code. Students will be exposed to the basics of several statistical packages (Stata, SAS, R, and Tableau). This course is intended for students who have no or minimal experience using statistical software.

 

GPH-GU 2115 Introduction to the Principles of Nutrition in Public Health (3)
Fall
Pre-requisites: none

This course will cover the basic concepts within the science of nutrition; detailing the nutrients, food sources, biological functions and nutritional requirements. The course will integrate the nutritional needs of populations, both nationally and globally, with emphasis on undernutrition, over nutrition and the double burden of malnutrition. The principles of nutritional needs will be applied to promoting health in vulnerable populations. 

 

GPH-GU 5170 Introduction to Public Health (0)
Spring
Pre-requisites: none

This course provides an introduction to foundational principles, concepts, and methods in public health. Topics include: the history of public health; public health values and principles; core functions of public health; the role of biostatistics and epidemiology in measuring population health; the use of evidence; environmental, social, and behavioral influences on health; and globalization and health.

GPH GU 2155 Introduction to Public Health Policy (3)
Spring
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2110 or 5110

This course explores policy tools and regulatory mechanisms that can be used to improve the public's health. It examines issues related to evidence, stakeholders, and the processes involved in policymaking and implementation. Students will learn to evaluate government and other institutions’ policies and formulate apt policy solutions to public health problems, such as those resulting from tobacco, alcohol, food safety, obesity and other current issues. We will discuss the government’s ability to shape health policy and limitations on the same in the context of firearms, injury prevention, and the labeling and marketing of products that cause harm.

 

GPH-GU 2145 Introduction to Public Health Systems: Management & Policy Issues (3)
Fall  
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2110 or 5110 and GPH-GU 2112 or 5112

This course introduces students to key issues, concepts and practices in the field of public health management and policy. We examine the organization, management and performance of public health departments and systems. The course emphasizes the need for leaders in today’s world of public  health  to  understand  central  issues  in  both  public  health  policy  and  management  and,  importantly,  how  these  interact.    The  overall  goal  of  the  course  is  to  promote  students’  understanding of, and ability to analyze, fundamental issues and ideas that are central to public health systems and to develop students’ skills for a range of careers in public health management and policy.

 

GPH-GU 2520 Issues in Global Pediatric Oral Health (3)
Spring  
Pre-requisites: none
Cross-listed with BIOL-GA 2520

Children in disadvantaged communities of developing countries have rates of untreated oral diseases that range from 32-90%. In over forty of the least developed countries, many communities have no basic or emergency care for their populations. This course will allow the student to: a) understand the epidemiology of oral diseases in children, b) understand and develop ways to meet the challenge of untreated oral diseases in disadvantaged communities, c) identify significant issues that affect the oral health of children worldwide and proposed ways to improve the oral health of children, and d) acquire the skills necessary to develop oral health promotion strategies directed at children across the world.

 

GPH-GU 2357 LGBTQ Health Disparities (3)
Spring  
Pre-requisites: none

This course examines the core interdisciplinary theories, knowledge, research, and methods evidenced in understanding LGBTQ health and disparities in the LGBTQ population.  The course introduces students to the main conceptual frameworks for the study of LGBTQ individuals, communities, and populations across the lifespan and overviews existing knowledge about LGBTQ health in the United States and globally.  The course highlights research design, measurement, ethics, and analysis issues in population research in LGBTQ health.

 

GPH-GU 2480 Longitudinal Analysis of Public Health Data (3)
Spring
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2354

This course covers modern methods for the analysis of repeated measures, correlated outcomes, and longitudinal data, including the unbalanced and incomplete data that are characteristic of public health research. There are four widely available methods for dealing with dependence: robust standard errors, generalized estimating equations, random effects models and fixed effects models. This course examines each of these methods in some detail, with an eye to discerning their relative advantages and disadvantages. Different methods are considered for quantitative outcomes and categorical outcomes. The course uses Stata statistical software and gives students hand-on experience working with real data.

 

GPH-GU 5270 Management of Public Health Disasters (3)
Spring
Pre-requisites: none

This course introduces basic principles and practices of public health disaster management.  Students explore threat and hazard identification, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery, and will apply their new skills and knowledge to address a wide range of natural and man-made disaster events of concern to public health. The course includes legal/ethical considerations, psychological impacts of disasters, community resiliency, planning for the needs of vulnerable populations, and other topics relevant to disaster management. For the culminating project for this course, students develop a disaster plan for their local department of health or for their workplace.  Students also complete (no-cost) on-line FEMA ICS certification training as part of this course.

 

GPH-GU 2950 Methods in Community Health Research (3)
Fall  
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2995 or 5995, GPH-GU 2106 or 5106, and GPH-GU 2160

Research in communities and natural (non-laboratory) settings requires flexibility and adaptability, especially when conducted in global sites where conditions are dynamic and often uncontrolled. This doctoral-level course will explore approaches to conducting research with and in communities experiencing health disparities, in particular, the Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) approach. Participants will become familiar with the historical, theoretical and philosophical perspectives that have informed CBPR. The course will review research methods utilized in conducting community health research including qualitative methods such as ethnographic observation and in-depth interviews (individual or focus group), use of quantitative surveys in combination with qualitative data or other data sources such as analyses of clinical or administrative data, geospacial methods(GIS) and Photovoice  (Mixed Methods).  Students will have the opportunity of interviewing collaborating community and academic partners.  This course assumes the student has had previous coursework in research design and data collection in both quantitative and qualitative methods.

GPH-GU 2346 Migrant Health and Social Integration in the Mediterranean (3)
January or Spring
Pre-requisites: none

At this time of unprecedented population movements and conflict across Europe and the world, migration is everywhere, and growing fast. In the context of forced migration in the Mediterranean, this course examines how culture and society impact health needs, health-seeking behavior, and health care quality for migrants, with focus on the key role of integration as migrants aim to live healthy lives. Communication skills for primary health care, living with chronic disease, working with interpreters, and mental health and well-being will be studied. The central, western, and eastern Mediterranean routes of forced migration will be emphasized, with faculty and practitioners drawing from experience in Italy, Spain, Greece and Turkey. Students will gain practical skills to contribute to a more integrated Europe and world.

 

GPH-GU 2210 Migration & Health (3 credits)
Spring  
Pre-requisites: none

This course will provide an overview of key topics in public health for migratory persons: specific population groups and their circumstances and rights, including immigrants, refugees and asylees, and other migrants; epidemiologic issues of migratory populations, including demographics, the shifting burden of disease, environmental and occupational concerns, and conflicts; and initiatives that address the health and health-related outcomes of migrants and immigrants. This course will utilize various perspectives, including historical, epidemiologic, and human rights, with a focus on the social determinants of migration and health over the life course. The course will impart to students the skills necessary to develop an integrated approach to addressing the health of immigrants and migratory populations.

 

GPH-GU 5420 Monitoring and Management of Public Health Programs for Equity (3)
Spring
Pre-requisite: none

This course develops skills and competencies for key steps in program monitoring and management to improve equity of global public health outcomes, namely situation analysis of equity, modeling effects of management decisions, monitoring changes in equity outcomes, and evaluating equity modeling, monitoring and outcomes. For each of these steps, students learn and apply core concepts, measures, and analytic tools concerning equity of outcomes, bottlenecks in coverage of interventions, and out of pocket health expenditures. The class will introduce databases, methods, and tools developed by UNICEF, World Bank, IHME and WHO that help public health professionals reduce inequity in health & nutrition outcomes in LMICs.

 

GPH-GU 2195 Nutrition and Metabolism (3)
Spring  
Pre-requisite: GPH-GU 2115

This course examines the biological and physiological roles of macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, fats) and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) in human health and disease. The associations between these nutrients and the development or prevention of adverse health outcomes relevant to public health, including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer, will be addressed.

 

GPH-GU 2125 Nutrition Education and Promotion Initiatives in Public Health (3)
Spring  
Pre-requisites: none 

This course will examine the role of nutrition education as a means of promoting, maintaining and improving the health and wellness of community populations. Using evidence based approach; the course will integrate skills obtained through practice and experience with external evidence from systematic research regarding nutrition education. Students will acquire the skills and knowledge to effectively identify, assess and adapt nutrition education materials and programs.

 

GPH-GU 2275 Nutrition Epidemiology in Public Health (3 credits)
Spring
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2106 or 5106

The course provides in-depth knowledge of the principles and challenges inherent to the discipline of nutritional epidemiology. In addition to covering fundamentals of nutritional epidemiology such as collection, analysis, and interpretation of data on dietary intake and nutritional status within diverse population groups, the course will place strong emphasis on methodological considerations in study design and pertinent statistical issues, including measurement error. The course emphasizes critical evaluation of dietary assessment methods and the results of research studies associating intake of foods, nutrients and dietary patterns with the risk of chronic diseases. Importantly, the course addresses the translation of scientific findings into nutritional recommendations and policies.

GPH-GU 2240 Perspectives in Global Mental Health (3)
Fall  
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2106 or 5106

Common mental disorders such as depression, anxiety and substance use disorders are leading causes of disease burden in the world today, rivaling HIV, malaria and heart disease in that respect. They are associated with serious functional impairment, reduced quality of life, unemployment and homelessness and exacerbate risk for, and severity of, medical illness. Yet they tend to get lost on the global health agenda. Lack of familiarity with interventions, measuring challenges, and stigma are, in part, to blame. Public health approaches to common mental disorders are also only recently demonstrating new rigor and maturity. This course provides exposure to this increasingly relevant public health challenge from a global perspective, with a particular focus on the epidemiology, risk factors and consequences, individual- and population-level approaches to treatment and prevention, and delivery of care for mental health problems in different settings worldwide. This course will challenge students to think critically about the existing literature in this area and about the role of culture, context and stigma in shaping public health responses to mental disorders.

 

GPH-GU 2288 Perspectives in Migrant Health and Human Rights (3)
Fall, every other year
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2140 or 5140

This course examines the intersection of migration, public health and human rights. Through an online learning environment, students will examine current trends in the field of migrant health and human rights, with a focus on gaining practical skills and engaging in critical self-reflection. The course is also a forum where public health and related practitioners share their professional experiences and insights working with a range of migrant populations. The course will enhance students’ abilities to think critically and analytically about current problems and challenges confronting the field, and will complement conceptual and theoretical coursework, emphasizing the processes of implementing migrant health and human rights programming from the perspective of practitioners working in the field.

 

GPH-GU 2374 Perspectives on Reproductive Health (3)
Fall semester, every other year
Pre-requisites: none

In this course, students will develop an understanding of the impact of policies and the provision of services on the health disparities in reproductive health care. Within a framework of reproductive and gender justice, students will examine the background and development of family planning, prenatal care, HIV/AIDS and abortion services in the United States as they relate to gender roles, attitudes about sexuality, institutional racism and health care service delivery. Students will develop analytical skills as well as the latest techniques for health education as they examine the most challenging issues and current research in the field of reproductive health

 

GPH-GU 2323 Pharmacoepidemiology (3)
Fall
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2450

The course is intended to provide students with an understanding of the methods and applications of pharmacoepidemiology (PE) -- the study of the use and effects of drugs in diverse populations. Students will be exposed to the role of PE in the biopharmaceutical development process, from the perspective of regulators (e.g. FDA), payers (e.g. managed care organizations) and the biopharmaceutical industry. Epidemiologic methods will be reviewed in the context of pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device evaluation, with special attention will be paid to PE methodological issues, such as study design, data sources, confounding-by-indication and by contraindication, forms of selection and information bias that are unique to PE research, as well as to risk-benefit analysis and safety evaluation.

 

GPH-GU 2371 Program Analysis and Evaluation (3)
Fall, Spring, Summer
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2995 or 5995
Cross-listed with PADM-GP 2171
This course serves as an introduction to those evaluation tools most commonly used to assess the performance of publicly funded programs, in both the public and private sector. Topics include developing and assessing program theory, implementation and process assessment, methods of impact evaluation, and efficiency analysis (cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis). The focus is on critical analysis and understanding of both the underlying programs and their evaluations.

 

GPH-GU 2349 Program Planning & Evaluation (3)
Fall and Spring
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2106 or 5106, GPH-GU 2140 or 5140, and GPH-GU 2995 or 5995

This course will introduce the major principles, concepts and methods used to plan, monitor and evaluate public health interventions and programs. Emphasis is placed on helping students develop the essential skills required in developing program plans, monitoring program implementation, and conducting evaluations for public health practice.

 

GPH-GU 2255 Psychoactive Drug Use and Public Health (3)
Spring or Summer
Pre-requisites: none

This course covers the broad group of drugs with psychoactive effects used world-wide, including: licit and illicit use of prescribed medications for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and opioid based pain medications; alcohol; marijuana; tobacco; Ecstasy, Designer Drugs and methamphetamine; cocaine and crack; heroin and methadone; hallucinogens such as LSD and peyote; as well as others like energy drinks and steroids. The epidemiology and effects on biologic, psychological, social function and public health as well as history, trafficking, regulation, treatment and controversies are the focus. In addition, pharmacological properties and effects of drugs are reviewed and linked to health, economic, and societal problems. Best clinical practices in prevention and treatment and controversies over management of substance use disorders (SUDs) will be discussed, along with ethical issues of interest to health providers and public health practitioners.

 

GPH-GU 2225 Psychometric Measurement and Analysis in Public Health Research & Practice (3)
Fall  
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2995 or 5995

This course will cover the principles of psychometric measurement as applied to public health research and practice, including the technical interpretation of survey results using generalizability theory. Content of the course will include individual measures of constructs and behaviors commonly assessed in public health research and practice. Following a review of the literature, students will design their own survey instruments and use them to collect data from anonymous online survey respondents. Students will examine and deconstruct principles and techniques used in psychometric studies to establish levels of reliability and validity and will utilize statistical software to conduct analyses.

 

GPH-GU 9345 Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response: A Global Perspective (3) (equivalent to GPH-GU 2345)
January
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2106 or 5106 and GPH-GU 2140 or 5140

This course will contrast US and international approaches to public health emergency preparedness and response.  Rotating among different sites within the NYU Global Network University, the course will focus on the aspects of global public health emergency response systems germane to the host country.  The emergency preparedness course in Israel will focus on the planning and deployment of international humanitarian aid missions, preparedness and response to terrorism, public health ethical issues that arise in conflict situations, and disaster mental health and community resilience.  The course will also review principles of surveillance, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery from natural and man-made emergency events, and cover both US and international emergency management and public health frameworks. 

 

GPH-GU 2296 Public Health Innovation & Entrepreneurship (3)
Spring  
Pre-requisites: none

This course helps current and future public health practitioners develop skills to create innovative, sustainable, and scalable solutions that address public health challenges. Student teams explore gaps in the availability, accessibility, acceptability, adequacy, and appropriateness of health-related goods and services in target communities and propose innovations that would narrow those gaps and improve health outcomes. Then, using a stepwise, structured approach, the teams develop and refine a business model for the innovation through stakeholder interviews designed to maximize product-market fit and minimize failure risk.

 

GPH-GU 2292 Public Health Law (3)
Spring
Pre-requisites: none

Many of public health's greatest successes have been based on the successful use of the law. Therefore, an understanding of the fundamentals of public health law and the legal foundations of public health is essential to appreciating the tools available to government to address public health threats. This class will examine the U.S. government’s authorities and also the legal limitations on government enacting law to improve population health at the federal, state, and local levels and by the executive, legislative, and judicial branches. We will additionally analyze core public health issues in the context of this legal framework.

 

GPH-GU 2112 Public Health Management & Leadership (1.5)
Fall and Spring semesters
Pre-requisites: none

This course introduces students to key concepts, principles and practices in the field of health management.  The course emphasizes the need for leaders in today's world of public health to understand central issues in health management. This course provides information for students to build an understanding of the fundamental ideas, issues, and problems currently debated in health management and to provide a foundation for practice in a range of careers in public health and health care management.   The overall goal of this course is to prepare students to increase their effectiveness in managing and leading individuals and teams in public health and health care organizations.

 

GPH-GU 2213 Public Health Nutrition (3)
Spring  
Pre-requisites: none

Public Health Nutrition involves the application of food and nutrition knowledge, policy, and research to improve the nutrition status and health of populations. This course emphasizes the distinction between population-based and individual-based approaches to prevention and alleviation of diet-related conditions, and the barriers to improving the nutrition status and health of diverse population groups. The course will discuss the social, behavioral, and food- and nutrition-related factors that affect health both nationally and globally. Lectures will integrate biology and nutrition research and their application to initiatives and programs designed to improve the nutrition status of populations. Students will gain an understanding of how evidence is translated into scientific findings for public health recommendations or policy. Students will also gain an appreciation of the level of nutrition literacy and the impact of nutrition messaging within the community.

GPH-GU 2160 Qualitative & Field Methods (3)
Fall  
Pre-requisites: none

Qualitative and field methods are flexible forms of inquiry suited to the dynamic nature of global public health research. The emphasis in this course will be on learning the basic content and skills associated with these methods including observation and in-depth interviewing. The course will begin with an introduction to the origins and foundations of qualitative/field methods and proceed to cover these topics: formulating research questions, ethical issues and access, designing the study, sampling, data collection, data analysis and writing the report. Core methods such as ethnography and grounded theory will be emphasized as stand-alone or as part of mixed methods designs. Public health-related approaches such as community-based participatory research and rapid assessment will also be included.

 

GPH-GU 5175 Readings in the History & Philosophy of Public Health I (0)
Fall  
Pre-requisites: none

This online course introduces students to readings examining the history of public health. This is the first of three required non-credit bearing courses on the history and philosophy of public health. Students complete all three courses during their first year of enrollment. The first course, GPH-GU 5175, focuses on the History of Public Health. The second course, GPH-GU 5180,covers Principles of Public Health. GPH-GU 5185, Social Justice and Public Health, is the third course. The three courses include discussion forums and/or reflection essays to promote thoughtful dialogue and analysis of the readings.

 

GPH-GU 5180 Readings in the History & Philosophy of Public Health II (0)
Spring
Pre-requisites: none

same as above.

 

GPH-GU 5185 Readings in the History & Philosophy of Public Health III (0)
Spring  
Pre-requisites: none

same as above.

 

GPH-GU 2353 Regression I: Linear Regression and Modeling (3)
Spring
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2995 or 5995

Regression models are one of the most important statistical techniques used in public health. This course focuses on data analysis that use linear regression models for continuous outcomes. The first part of this course introduces simple and multiple linear regressions, principles of ordinary least square regression models, model assumptions, and inferences about model parameters. The second part of the course focus on important practical matters, such as prediction, variable selection, moderated effects, and mediation. These two parts together provide the foundations for more advanced statistics modeling. Examples are drawn from broad areas of public health research. All the analyses will be taught and performed using Stata statistical software.

 

GPH-GU 2354 Regression II: Categorical Analysis (3)
Fall
Pre-requisite: GPH-GU 2353

This course covers modern methods for the analysis of binary and other discrete response data, including applications to Public Health. We will cover topics such as logistic regression, conditional models, and multinomial regression. This course will teach you how to evaluate and interpret models for binary, ordinal, and other discrete response data using Stata statistical software. This course assumes that the student has some previous experience and knowledge of regression analysis. In this course, we will discuss 2x2 tables, independence tests, and measures of association, Poisson and negative binomial distributions, and analysis with logistic regression.

 

GPH-GU 2344 Reproductive & Pediatric Health: A Focus in Nutrition (3)
Fall  
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2106 or 5106

This course is concerned with the study of nutritionally-related determinants of health and disease in maternal, infant, and child populations. Biological, physiological, and psychological aspects of reproduction (maternal) and growth and development (infants and children) will be discussed, with particular focus on how they are influenced by nutrition. Methodological issues encountered in research (e.g. data collection and analysis) will also be incorporated into lectures and discussions. After completion of this course, students should understand the important immediate and long-term roles that nutrition plays in reproductive and pediatric health.

 

GPH-GU 2361 Research Methods in Public Health (3) 
Spring
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2106 or 5106

This course is a review of research and original writings related to public health. Students will learn to apply research methodology to problems in public health. This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of research study design and methods. It serves as an introduction to quantitative and qualitative approaches to research, as well as ethical issues in conducting research. Through the mix of texts, articles from the public health literature and course work, students will build skills for conducting research and critically evaluating research designs and research findings.

 

GPH-GU 5410 Results-Focused Strengthening of Health Systems in LMIC Countries (3)
Fall
Pre-requisites: none

This course covers elements that are necessary for developing impactful global public health programs in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMIC), including but not limited to: a comprehensive overview of health systems and their specific components; an explanation of how the health system functions in different country settings; and an overview of crosscutting system-wide supply and demand bottlenecks and evidence-based strategies to address these. Assignments use practical country case studies and analyses of data sets on health system bottlenecks, strategic shifts, and enabling environments as well as estimations of resource requirements, cost effectiveness, and financing needs for health system strengthening.

GPH-GU 2317 Social Epidemiology (3) 
Spring  
Pre-requisite: GPH-GU 2106 or 5106

This course explores the subdivision of epidemiology that elucidates the ways in which social identities, processes, arrangements and structures shape the population distribution of health and disease, and produce social inequalities in health. The current form of social epidemiology emerged in the late 1970’s but has really grown in prominence in the last 20 years. Social epidemiology is now an established subdivision of epidemiology, both borrowing from- and contributing to- a discipline wide discourse on theories, methods and principles. This course rests on the premise that the study of the determinants of health at multiple levels, and their interrelationships, is essential in order to better explain, potentially predict, and hopefully improve the health of populations. Although this course is grounded in an appreciation for the contribution of different disciplines to the study of population health, it focuses on the particular role that epidemiologic perspectives and methods can offer to improve our understanding of population health. This course is intended to provide an overview of the major areas of inquiry, key theories, seminal findings, methodological challenges/solutions and ongoing debates. Each topic could constitute a course in and of itself; this course is designed to equip the student with a working knowledge of the field of social epidemiology and the tools to delve further into their chosen area within social epidemiology. By the end of the course students will understand the theoretical, substantive, and methodological parameters of social epidemiology, and be able to evaluate its strengths and limitations.

 

GPH-GU 2370 Stigma, Health, and Discrimination (3)
Summer
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2140 or 5140 and GPH-GU 2361
This course will focus on stigma and discrimination as general processes that apply to a broad range of public health phenomena, from mental illness to obesity to HIV/AIDS and sexual orientation to race and race/ethnic groups. The course will include conceptual frameworks of stigma and discrimination drawn from an interdisciplinary perspective, with a focus on how these processes adversely impact stigmatized individuals and groups. Following readings, written critical analyses, and class discussion, students will write a final project focusing on stigma and discrimination. Public health perspectives will examine whether stigmatization can be useful (e.g., stigma against smoking), and introduce strategies for reducing stigma on the population level.

 

GPH-GU 2310 Strategic Management and Leadership (3)
Fall, Spring, Summer
Pre-requisites:
Cross-listed with PADM-GP 2110

This course focuses on the three sets of key questions: (1) mission and vision ("What areas or activities should we be working in?"); (2) strategy and operations ("How can we perform effectively in this area?"); and (3) leadership (“What leadership skills are needed to develop and implement strategies effectively?”).  We will cover both strategy formulation ("What should our strategy be?") and strategy implementation ("What do we need to do to make this strategy work?"). All organizations – government agencies as well as non-profit or private companies with a public purpose – face substantial challenges that demand strategic responses, often in uncertain economic, social, or political contexts.  To deal effectively with these challenges, managers need knowledge and skills in strategic management and leadership:  setting and aligning goals with the organization’s mission; handling complex trade-offs between demand for services and resource constraints; defining measures of success; motivating staff and other stakeholders; developing relationships with relevant groups; dealing with crises and environments in transition; and leading organizational change.  In short, the course emphasizes the multiple, related requirements of the leader/manager's job: analysis, creativity, and action.

 

GPH-GU 2387 Survey Design, Analysis, and Reporting (3)
Spring
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2995 or 5995, and GPH-GU 2106 or 5106

This course will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of survey design, analysis, and reporting. The course starts with secondary data analysis and transitions to primary data collection and. Secondary data analysis covers hypothesis testing using nationally representative samples (e.g., NHANES, BRFSS, NHIS, YRBSS) with complex sampling designs, weighted and nested (multilevel) data analysis. Primary data collections includes questionnaire development, scale development, and data analysis of survey data using Stata (e.g., regression modeling, factor analysis, item response theory). Survey administration, study design and sampling, development of web-based surveys using Qualtrics, creating codebooks and managing data are covered through an experiential learning process.

 

GPH-GU 9347 Tackling Global Health Disparities through Implementation Science Research (3)
January
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2106 or 5106

Students will examine and review the epidemiology and drivers of the global burden of non-communicable diseases as well as two ‘chronic’ infectious diseases (tuberculosis and HIV). Students will explore solutions through an implementation science research framework. ‘Real life’ case studies will be used to allow students to fully grasp how to design, implement and evaluate effective interventions in low resource settings and among vulnerable populations. The course will focus on the use of alternative research study designs as well as the potential for mobile health interventions to improve disparities in access to care through task-shifting and task-sharing among front-line health providers to reduce health disparities. This course will run for 5 days in New York City then students will travel to Kilimanjaro, Tanzania

 

GPH-GU 2960 Theories in Public Health Practice, Policy, and Research (3)
Fall
Pre-requisites for MPH students: GPH-GU 2140 or 5140 and GPH-GU 2361

The ‘intervention imperative’ in public health has  traditionally  overshadowed  theory  development. Consequently, many public health practices and interventions are predicated upon unexamined or under-theorized assumptions.  As the  scope  of  public  health  widened  from  infectious  diseases,  its  theoretical foundations extended beyond biomedical ‘germ theory’ explanations to include behavioral psychology.  By  the  late  20thcentury,  these  foundations  grew  to  incorporate  multi-factorial  etiologies  and  systems approaches  borrowing  from  social  science  theories  and  methods. This  course  examines  an  array  of theories  and  conceptual  models  used  in  public  health. They are roughly categorized into the following domains:  a) biomedical; b) psychological; c) socio-cultural; d) organizational/community; and e) structural /critical.  Theoretical  perspectives  on  specific  public  health  problems  as  well  as  topics  of  interest  to students in the class will be examined and discussed. Emphasis will be on adopting a comparative, critical and integrative perspective on theories and key concepts in public health practice, policy and research.


GPH-GU 2686 Thesis I: Practice & Integrative Learning Experiences (2)
Fall
Pre-requisites:
GPH-GU 2140 or 5140, GPH-GU 2106 or 5106, GPH-GU 2995 or 5995, and one advanced methods course
This course (part of a two-semester series; Thesis I and Thesis II) introduces the thesis as the culminating activity for MPH candidates in the Biostatistics (BIOS), Epidemiology (EPI), and Social and Behavioral Science (SBS) concentrations. The thesis is intended to reflect the training students have received in the MPH program and demonstrate their ability to integrate, synthesize, and apply the knowledge and skills from coursework and applied practice experiences to a real world public health problem or issue that is relevant to their major field of interest. The first semester course, Thesis I, provides students with the knowledge and skills to develop and refine a research question, critically assess and synthesize the literature relevant to the topic of interest, and formulate a project plan, including a methodological approach, resulting in a thesis proposal.

 

GPH-GU 2687 Thesis II: Practice & Integrative Learning Experiences (2)
Spring  
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2686

This is the second course in a two-course series that continues work on the culminating activity, the thesis, for MPH candidates in the Biostatistics (BIOS), Epidemiology (EPI) and Social and Behavioral Science (SBS) concentrations. The focus of the course is on completing the proposed thesis product and preparing for the presentation of the final thesis. Students will work closely with their Thesis advisor during the semester, but the course instructor will provide guidance on several remaining sections (e.g., results, discussion, structured abstract) of the thesis. The thesis should demonstrate the student’s ability to think critically, synthesize foundational and concentration competencies, provide understanding and insight into a substantive area of inquiry, and convey ideas effectively to an intended audience.

GPH-GU 2270 Translating Research into Practice: Adapting and Implementing Evidence-Based Public Health Interventions (3)
Spring
Pre-requisites: GPH-GU 2410 and GPH-GU 2349

Evidence-based public health is now recognized as the foundational gold standard for developing programs and interventions to improve population health. In practice, many challenges exist to identifying appropriate evidence-based interventions and adapting them to perform as intended in new settings. This course will examine approaches for selecting, adapting, and implementing evidence-based public health interventions. The framework presented in the course will help prepare students to adapt and implement programs that are theory-based, evidence-based, community-based, and reality-based.

 

GPH-GU 92 Urban Health Equity: New York and London – A Comparative Perspective (3)
January
Pre-requisites: none

This course will  introduce students to urban health and its broad determinants with a comparative focus on NYC & London. A one day pre-course session in NYC with NYCDOHMH officials and NYU faculty will be followed by the London-based program which will be divided between classroom lecture and discussion and a field project.  London based urban health researchers, public health leaders and policy makers will provide an overview of conceptual frameworks for urban health and health equity from a global perspective  and from their own work  implementing and evaluating interventions in cities. The field project is being developed collaboratively with the NYCDOHMH Center for Health Equity and the Office of the Director, Public Health England for London.

GPH-GU 2319 Writing Grants and Funding Proposals for Health-Related Programs (3) 
Spring
Pre-requisites: none

A “hands-on” approach to grant writing including development of skills in locating potential funding sources & the use of appropriate grant-writing style & technique. Students are guided through the development of an U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant proposal, from locating appropriate NIH Institutes; through development of program objectives, background, & methods; to the peer review process.