Correlates of burnout in small independent primary care practices in an urban setting

Blechter, B., Jiang, N., Cleland, C., Berry, C., Ogedegbe, O., & Shelley, D.

Publication year

2018

Journal title

Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine

Volume

31

Issue

4

Page(s)

529-536
Abstract
Background: Little is known about the prevalence and correlates of burnout among providers who work in small independent primary care practices (<5 providers). Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis by using data collected from 235 providers practicing in 174 small independent primary care practices in New York City. Results: The rate of provider-reported burnout was 13.5%. Using bivariate logistic regression, we found higher adaptive reserve scores were associated with lower odds of burnout (odds ratio, 0.12; 95% CI, 0.02– 0.85; P .034). Conclusion: The burnout rate was relatively low among our sample of providers compared with previous surveys that focused primarily on larger practices. The independence and autonomy providers have in these small practices may provide some protection against symptoms of burnout. In addition, the relationship between adaptive reserve and lower rates of burnout point toward potential interventions for reducing burnout that include strengthening primary care practices’ learning and development capacity.

Community Oriented Primary Care: Training for Urban Practice

Boufford, J. I., & Shonubi, P. A.

Publication year

1986

Setting the global agenda for health

Boufford, J. I. In Global Dimensions in Domestic Health Issues.

Publication year

2000

Health policymaking: the role of the federal government

Boufford, J. I., & Lee, P. R. In Ethical Dimensions of Health Policy.

Publication year

2002

Leadership development for global health

Boufford, J. I. In Global Health Leadership and Management.

Publication year

2005

Urban Health: Global Perspectives

Boufford, J. I., Vlahov, D., Pearson, C., & Norris, L.

Publication year

2010

The challenge of attribution: who is accountable for population health?

Gourevitch, M., Cannell, T., Boufford, J. I., & Summers, C.

Publication year

2012

Journal title

American Journal of Public Health

The InterAcademy Partnership's Young Physician Leaders: a leadership training and networking program

McGrath, P., Boufford, J. I., & Kareithi, M.

Publication year

2016

Journal title

Journal of Health Systems and Reform

Volume

2

Issue

3

Page(s)

265-271

Health, Polysubstance Use, and Criminal Justice Involvement Among Adults With Varying Levels of Opiod Use

Winkelman, T. N., Chang, V. W., & Binswanger, I. A.

Publication year

2018

Journal title

JAMA Network Open

Volume

1

Issue

3
Abstract
Importance Health profiles and patterns of involvement in the criminal justice system among people with various levels of opioid use are poorly defined. Data are needed to inform a public health approach to the opioid epidemic.Objective To examine the association between various levels of opioid use in the past year and physical and mental health, co-occurring substance use, and involvement in the criminal justice system.Design, Setting, and Participants This retrospective, cross-sectional analysis used the 2015-2016 National Survey on Drug Use and Health to assess the independent association of intensity of opioid use with health, co-occurring substance use, and involvement in the criminal justice system among US adults aged 18 to 64 years using multivariable logistic regression.Exposures No opioid use vs prescription opioid use, misuse, or use disorder or heroin use.Main Outcomes and Measures Self-reported physical and mental health, disability, co-occurring substance use, and past year and lifetime involvement in the criminal justice system.Results The sample consisted of 78 976 respondents (42 495 women and 36 481 men), representative of 196 280 447 US adults. In the weighted sample, 124 026 842 adults reported no opioid use in the past year (63.2%; 95% CI, 62.6%-63.7%), 61 462 897 reported prescription opioid use in the past year (31.3%; 95% CI, 30.8%-31.8%), 8 439 889 reported prescription opioid misuse in the past year (4.3%; 95% CI, 4.1%-4.5%), 1 475 433 reported prescription opioid use disorder in the past year (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.7%-0.8%), and 875 386 reported heroin use in the past year (0.4%; 95% CI, 0.4%-0.5%). Individuals who reported any level of opioid use were significantly more likely than individuals who reported no opioid use to be white, have a low income, and report a chronic condition, disability, severe mental illness, or co-occurring drug use. History of involvement in the criminal justice system increased as intensity of opioid use increased (no use, 15.9% [19 562 158 of 123 319 911]; 95% CI, 15.4%-16.4%; prescription opioid use, 22.4% [13 712 162 of 61 204 541]; 95% CI, 21.7%-23.1%; prescription opioid misuse, 33.2% [2 793 391 of 8 410 638]; 95% CI, 30.9%-35.6%; prescription opioid use disorder, 51.7% [762 189 of 1 473 552]; 95% CI, 45.4%-58.0%; and heroin use, 76.8% [668 453 of 870 250]; 95% CI, 70.6%-82.1%). In adjusted models, any level of opioid use was associated with involvement in the criminal justice system in the past year compared with no opioid use.Conclusions and Relevance Individuals who use opioids have complicated health profiles and high levels of involvement in the criminal justice system. Combating the opioid epidemic will require public health interventions that involve criminal justice systems, as well as policies that reduce involvement in the criminal justice system among individuals with substance use disorders.

Structural divers of PrEP use in urban sexual minority men: the P18 cohort study

Jaiswal, J., Griffin-Tomas, M., Singer, S. N., Greene, R., Zambrano, I., Kaudeyr, S., Kapadia, F., & Halkitis, P. N.

Publication year

2018

Journal title

Current HIV Research
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