Safety climate: assessing management and organizational influences on safety

DeJoy, D. M., Gershon, R., & Schaffer, B. S.

Publication year

2004

Journal title

Professional safety

Preliminary results from the World Trade Center evacuation study-New York City

Gershon, R., Hogan, E., Qureshi, K. A., & Doll, L. S.

Publication year

2004

Journal title

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Psychosocial work stress in female funeral service parctitioners

Goldenhar, L. M., Gershon, R., Mueller, C., Karkashian, C., & Swanson, N.

Publication year

2001

Journal title

Equal Opportunities International

Page(s)

17-38

The public health and law enforcement stress

Gershon, R.

Publication year

1999

Journal title

National Institute of Justice Journal

Page(s)

27

Review of accidents/injuries among emergency medical service workers in Baltimore, Maryland

Gershon, R., Vlahov, D., Kelen, G. D., Conrad, B., & Murphy, L.

Publication year

1995

Journal title

Prehospital and Disaster Medicine

Page(s)

14

Microenvironmental immunoregulation: possible role of contrasuppressor cells in maintaining immune responses in gut-associated lymphoid tissues.

Green, D. R., Gold, J., Gershon, R., & Gershon, R. K.

Publication year

1982

Journal title

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Page(s)

889

Health care emergency preparedness: changes on the horizon

Gershon, R., & Zhi, Q.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Journal of the Association of Occupational Health Professionals in Healthcare

Page(s)

20

Adherence to emergency public heath measures for bio events: review of US studies

Gershon, R., Zhi, Q., Chin, A. F., Nwankwo, E. M., & Gargano, L. M.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness

Page(s)

1

Public misperception that very low nicotine cigarettes are less carcinogenic

Byron, M. J., Jeong, M., Abrams, D. B., & Brewer, N. T.

Publication year

2018

Journal title

Tobacco control
Abstract
Objective: The USA is considering a very low nicotine content (VLNC) cigarette standard. We sought to characterise the prevalence and correlates of the incorrect belief that VLNC cigarettes are less carcinogenic than current cigarettes, as this could reduce motivation to quit. Methods: Participants were a nationally representative sample of 650 adult smokers in the USA. In 2015-2016, before the VLNC proposal became public, these smokers took part in an online survey. We used multivariate weighted analyses to calculate ORs and percentages and a ‡2 test to examine the association between variables. Results: Overall, 47.1% of smokers believed that smoking VLNC cigarettes for 30 years would be less likely to cause cancer than smoking current cigarettes. This misperception was more common among smokers who were aged above 55 (56.6%) and black (57.4%). Additionally, 23.9% of smokers reported they would be less likely to quit if the USA adopted a VLNC standard. Thinking that VLNC cigarettes would be less carcinogenic was associated with smokers reporting they would be less likely to quit (P<0.01). Conclusions: Many smokers had the misperception that smoking VLNC cigarettes is less likely to cause cancer, and some stated that they would be less likely to quit. A VLNC standard may be more effective if accompanied by a communication campaign that emphasises the continued dangers of smoking VLNC cigarettes due to the many toxic chemicals in smoke.

Transitions in electronic cigarette use among adults in the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study, Waves 1 and 2 (2013-2015)

Coleman, B., Rostron, B., Johnson, S. E., Persoskie, A., Pearson, J., Stanton, C., Choi, K., Anic, G., Goniewicz, M. L., Cummings, K. M., Kasza, K. A., Silveira, M. L., Delnevo, C., Niaura, R., Abrams, D. B., Kimmel, H. L., Borek, N., Compton, W. M., & Hyland, A.

Publication year

2018

Journal title

Tobacco control
Abstract
Introduction: This study assessed patterns of e-cigarette and cigarette use from Wave 1 to Wave 2 among adult e-cigarette users at Wave 1 of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study. Methods: We examined changes in e-cigarette use frequency at Wave 2 among adult e-cigarette users at Wave 1 (unweighted n=2835). Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) were calculated using a predicted marginal probability approach to assess correlates of e-cigarette discontinuance and smoking abstinence at Wave 2. Results: Half (48.8%) of adult e-cigarette users at Wave 1 discontinued their use of e-cigarettes at Wave 2. Among dual users of e-cigarettes and cigarettes at Wave 1, 44.3% maintained dual use, 43.5% discontinued e-cigarette use and maintained cigarette smoking and 12.1% discontinued cigarette use at Wave 2, either by abstaining from cigarette smoking only (5.1%) or discontinuing both products (7.0%). Among dual users at Wave 1, daily e-cigarette users were more likely than non-daily users to report smoking abstinence at Wave 2 (aPR=1.40, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.91). Using a customisable device (rather than a non-customisable one) was not significantly related to smoking abstinence at Wave 2 (aPR=1.14, 95% CI 0.81 to 1.60). Conclusions: This study suggests that e-cigarette use patterns are highly variable over a 1-year period. This analysis provides the first nationally representative estimates of transitions among US adult e-cigarette users. Future research, including additional waves of the PATH Study, can provide further insight into long-term patterns of e-cigarette use critical to understanding the net population health impact of e-cigarettes in USA.
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