Global and Environmental Health Sciences: Spotlight on Fall Internship

October 3, 2018

Read more about how MPH students prepare to go to Cox's Bazar with UNICEF to work with Rohingya refugees.
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Dispatch from the Road: Kenya

September 28, 2018

Peter Navario and Niyati Parekh report from the HealthRight Global Network Retreat in Nairobi, Kenya.
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GPH at the United Nations General Assembly

September 28, 2018

 

Students and Faculty Take Part in the 2018 UNGA

 

September 28, 2018

By: Dr. Chris Dickey and Kassandra Jones (MPH ‘19)

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A Feast of Ideas: UN General Assembly Side Event

September 28, 2018

A Perspective Piece by Diana Klatt, MPH '19. In our fast-paced lives, it can be hard to find the time to consider our health. Our newsfeeds are on constant refresh, our schedules are packed, and our ...
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New Faculty: Dr. Ralph J. DiClemente

September 26, 2018

The New Professor and Chair of the Department of Social & Behavioral Sciences and Associate Dean of Public Health Innovation at the College of Global Public Health as well as an Affiliated Sci

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Transferring Stroke Knowledge from Children to Parents: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Community Stroke Educational Programs

Ilunga Tshiswaka, D., Sikes, L. E., Iwelunmor, J., Ogedegbe, O., & Williams, O.

Publication year

2018

Journal title

Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases
Abstract
Background: The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis on child-to-parent communication of stroke information (Child-Mediated Stroke Communication, CMSC) is to provide the highest levels of evidence supporting the role of this approach in community education. Methods: Databases such as PubMed, Google Scholar, PsycINFO, Web of Science, MEDLINE, and CINHAL were searched to gather information on CMSC followed by a meta-analysis. The eligibility criteria were as follows: (a) children aged 9-15 years and parents, (b) randomized or nonrandomized trials, and (c) outcome variables that included the proportions of parents answering the pretest and post-test on stroke knowledge regarding risk factors, symptoms, and what to do in the event of stroke. Results: Of the 1668 retrieved studies, 9 articles were included. Meta-analytical findings yielded that the proportions of correct answers for stroke symptoms and its risk factors among parents were 0.686 (95% CI: 0.594-0.777) at baseline and increased to 0.847 (95% CI: 0.808-0.886) at immediate post-test and 0.845 (95% CI: 0.804-0.886) delayed post-test. The proportions of correct answers for behavioral intent to call 911 when witnessing stroke was 0.712 (95% CI: 0.578-0.846) at baseline, rising to 0.860 (95% CI: 0.767-0.953) at immediate post-test, and 0.846 (95% CI: 0.688-1.004) at delayed post-test. Conclusions: CMSC is effective for educating families. More work is needed to increase the use of validated stroke literacy instruments and behavioral theory, and to reduce parental attrition in research studies.

Improving community stroke preparedness in the HHS (hip-hop stroke) randomized clinical trial

Williams, O., Quinn, E. L., Teresi, J., Eimicke, J. P., Kong, J., Ogedegbe, O., & Noble, J.

Publication year

2018

Journal title

Stroke

Volume

49

Issue

4

Page(s)

972-979
Abstract
Background and Purpose-Defciencies in stroke preparedness cause major delays to stroke thrombolysis, particularly among economically disadvantaged minorities. We evaluated the effectiveness of a stroke preparedness intervention delivered to preadolescent urban public school children on the stroke knowledge/preparedness of their parents. Methods-We recruited 3070 fourth through sixth graders and 1144 parents from 22 schools into a cluster randomized trial with schools randomized to the HHS (Hip-Hop Stroke) intervention or attentional control (nutrition classes). HHS is a 3-hour culturally tailored, theory-based, multimedia stroke literacy intervention targeting school children, which systematically empowers children to share stroke information with parents. Our main outcome measures were stroke knowledge/preparedness of children and parents using validated surrogates. Results-Among children, it was estimated that 1% (95% confdence interval [CI], 0%-1%) of controls and 2% (95% CI, 1%-4%; P=0.09) of the intervention group demonstrated optimal stroke preparedness (perfect scores on the knowledge/preparedness test) at baseline, increasing to 57% (95% CI, 44%-69%) immediately after the program in the intervention group compared with 1% (95% CI, 0%-1%; P<0.001) among controls. At 3-month follow-up, 24% (95% CI, 15%-33%) of the intervention group retained optimal preparedness, compared with 2% (95% CI, 0%-3%; P<0.001) of controls. Only 3% (95% CI, 2%-4%) of parents in the intervention group could identify all 4 letters of the stroke FAST (Facial droop, Arm weakness, Speech disturbance, Time to call 911) acronym at baseline, increasing to 20% at immediate posttest (95% CI, 16%-24%) and 17% at 3-month delayed post-test (95% CI, 13%-21%; P=0.0062), with no signifcant changes (3% identifcation) among controls. Four children, all in the intervention group, called 911 for real-life stroke symptoms, in 1 case overruling a parent's wait-and-see approach. Conclusions-HHS is an effective, intergenerational model for increasing stroke preparedness among economically disadvantaged minorities.
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