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MPH Course Descriptions

APSTA-GE 2004 Advanced Modeling I: Topics in Multivariate Analysis Spring
This course is designed to meet the data analytic needs of the doctoral students whose dissertation relies on the analysis of quantitative data. Procedures important to the data analyst are covered including data entry and definition, treating missing data, detecting outliers, and transforming distributions. First term topics include multiple regression, analysis of covariance, repeated measures analysis of variance, and multivariate analysis of variance and covariance. Second term topics emphasize categorical data analysis, odds, rations, standardization, log linear models, logistic regression. Other topics include multinominal logistic models, survival analysis, principle components, and factor analysis. The approach is conceptual with heavy reliance on computer software packages. Appropriate for doctoral students desiring specialized knowledge beyond the introductory sequence
GPH-GU 2218 Assessing Community Health Needs Fall
This course is devoted to flexible forms of inquiry suited to the local context of global public health research. Sometimes known as ?action research?, ?rapid assessment, and ?community-based participatory research? these approaches share a commitment to working closely with and in communities to identify health risks and effective interventions for ameliorating them. Although field research may include surveys and other forms of quantitative research, the emphasis in this class will be on qualitative methods with mixed method approaches included where appropriate. The focus will be on introducing the basic content/skills of on-the-ground field research under challenging conditions, i.e., shortages of time and resources as well as cultural/ linguistic differences. There are additional aspects to learning these methods (e.g., data analysis) that require much more time and skill development than is possible in this brief introductory course. Interested students are strongly advised to take additional coursework in qualitative methods.
GPH-GU 2325 Behavioral Communication Strategies for Global Epidemics Spring
This course focuses on the integration of three public health disciplines for emergency action: epidemiology, behavioral health/ intervention research and public health communication to provide students with a knowledge base and foundation of skills to be able to design and implement strategies in disease prevention and response in outbreak situations, with a focus on the reemergence of Polio and Ebola.
GPH-GU 5025 Bioethical Issues in Society 3, Fall
GPH-GU 2025 Introduction to Bioethics* (3 credits) This course will provide an in-depth exploration of the field of bioethics. Through historical examples, case studies, and cases upon which Professor Caplan was asked to consult as a leading bioethicist, students will study a range of bioethical challenges and conflicts. These conflicts include those confronted by individuals, families, health care providers and policy makers. Students will also examine and discuss pivotal decisions many of which affect both life and death related to medical treatments and interventions, research, and policy decisions. Each lesson will present content in the form of questions and potential answers that stimulate group discussions and activities. Students focus on practical problem-solving for cases that may arise in hospitals, nursing homes, and other healthcare facilities as well as within the context of their own lives. The goal of the course is to enable students to facilitate ethical decision-making in their professional as well as personal lives, and to be better informed citizens.
GPH-GU 2995 Biostatistics for Public Health Fall Spring
<p>This course covers basic probability, descriptive and inferential statistics, and the role of biostatistics in the practice of public health. Specific attention will be given to common probability distributions in public health and medicine, t-tests, Analysis of Variance, multiple linear and logistic regression, categorical data analysis, and nonparametric statistics. Statistical topics are presented conceptually with little derivation, and applications are demonstrated using common statistical software.</p>
GPH-GU 5995 Biostatistics for Public Health Fall
This course will examine the basic concepts and techniques of analysis of data in public health research, investigate and apply data analytic techniques which are appropriate for answering research questions and handling varying types data, report and interpret results of data analyses, consider the limitations of statistical techniques, and read and translate results from public health studies. Students will be introduced to the basic principles of statistical computing using analytic software. The course will emphasize statistical theory and techniques for determining bivariable associations, with an introduction to multivariable analysis.
GPH-GU 2920 Biostatistics: Regression and Multivariate Modeling Spring
This course is a second year course in advanced statistical techniques that covers useful quantitative tools in public health research. This course focuses on data analysis that utilizes general linear regression models for continuous, categorical, discrete or limited outcomes that are commonly seen in health and policy studies. Examples are drawn from broad areas of public health and policy research including determinants of self-reported health status or factors influencing number of clinic visits. In this course students will also learn the principles of likelihood-based inference, which will assist them in some of the more advanced statistics courses.
GPH-GU 2621 Capstone I: Practice ​and Integrative Learning Experiences Fall
Capstone is learning in action. Part of the core curriculum of the Masters program in Global Public Health, it provides students with both a critical learning experience and an opportunity to perform a public service. Over the course of an academic year, students work in teams -- either to address challenges, solve problems and identify opportunities for a client organization or to conduct research on a preCapstone is learning in action. Part of the core curriculum of the Masters program in Global Public Health, it provides students with both a critical learning experience and an opportunity to perform a public service. Over the course of an academic year, students work in teams -- either to address challenges, solve problems and identify opportunities for a client organization or to conduct research on a pressing social question. Ultimately, Capstone contributes not only to the students? education, but is a university resource for the public good. In architecture, the capstone is the crowning piece of an arch, the center stone that holds the arch together, giving it shape and strength. MPGPH?s Capstone program plays a similar role, by integrating and enhancing student learning in several different arenas: a content or issue area, key process skills including project management and teamwork, and methods for gathering, analyzing and reporting data. Capstone requires students to interweave their learning in all these areas, and to do so in real time, in an unpredictable, complex real world environment. Although each student will be assigned to a team, the class will work as a learning community dedicated to the success of all the projects.
GPH-GU 2622 Capstone II: Practice and Integrative Learning Experiences Spring
Capstone is learning in action. Part of the core curriculum of the Masters program in Global Public Health, it provides students with both a critical learning experience and an opportunity to perform a public service. Over the course of an academic year, students work in teams -- either to address challenges, solve problems and identify opportunities for a client organization or to conduct research on a pressing social question. Ultimately, Capstone contributes not only to the students? education, but is a university resource for the public good. In architecture, the capstone is the crowning piece of an arch, the center stone that holds the arch together, giving it shape and strength. MPGPH?s Capstone program plays a similar role, by integrating and enhancing student learning in several different arenas: a content or issue area, key process skills including project management and teamwork, and methods for gathering, analyzing and reporting data. Capstone requires students to interweave their learning in all these areas, and to do so in real time, in an unpredictable, complex real world environment. Although each student will be assigned to a team, the class will work as a learning community dedicated to the success of all the projects.
GPH-GU 2265 Climate Change and Environmental Policy Spring
This course is about Climate Change i.e. Global Warming! Climate Change is posed as the most significant public policy challenge of the 21st century. We will intensively cover the climate change science, public health impacts, ecological consequences, global food and security, and policy options. Adaptation strategies to control outcomes of storm flooding, increased ozone and heat waves, drought, and threats to biodiversity and mitigation with renewable energy promotion will be covered. Local solutions will be evaluated from city governments, States, Countries, to Global treaties such as UN Framework Committee on Climate Change-Conference of the Parties.
GPH-GU 2415 Community-Based Health Interventions Spring
Identification and evaluation of programs designed to reduce health risks among individuals and communities, with a focus on factors influencing the design of interventions, choice of methods, ways to assess the magnitude of change effected by the intervention, and ethical issues raised by the interventions.
GPH-GU 2316 Community Health: A Society in Transition Summer
No description available
HPAM-GP 2825 Continuous Quality Improvement 3, Fall Spring
<p>This course encourages students to think creatively about what it means for a healthcare organization to make quality the highest priority. We will explore the current forces driving the push toward quality outcomes and accountability at all levels and settings of healthcare, while focusing on the philosophy of continuous improvement through team work and statistical thinking. Students will use structural tools for analysis, decision making and performance measurement.</p>
GPH-GU 2320 Data Utilization in Public Health Practice Spring
Public health practice typically demands competencies in identifying, extracting, analyzing and interpreting information from large survey and administrative data sets (e.g., Demographic and Health Surveys), government reports, qualitative studies, and other data sources. This course will develop those competencies through a rigorous evaluation of existing resources, their strengths and limitations, and best practices in data utilization for situational assessment, monitoring, policy and strategy development, and surveillance of health outcomes through real-world case studies and practices. The course will also provide students with skills in data analysis and data visualization using Microsoft Excel and the online mapping software CartoDB.
GPH-GU 2260 Disasters, Complex Systems, and the Social Ecology of Health Spring
Disasters, whether natural, technological, or man-made, often reveal the strength of our social fabric. They also reveal how much our health and well-being is dependent upon numerous complex systems in our lives. These systems can range from our internal cellular and micro-biological systems; through social and cultural systems; to public health and medical systems; to critical infrastructure and lifeline systems; to larger environmental and ecological systems, among others. This course will employ a number of disciplinary approaches to understanding risk, vulnerability, and resilience as we explore the theories, frameworks and methods for understanding disasters and their relationship to population health. It will be particularly valuable for students interested in public health research and practice.
GPH-GU 2440 Emerging Diseases and Bioterrorism Fall
The emergence of new pathogens and drug resistance, as well as increased transmission opportunities caused by human migration, political instability and breakdown of healthcare infrastructure, has led to a rising prevalence of infectious disease. This course aims to provide training in the biology, epidemiology and control of emerging diseases. It will provide the necessary skills to analyze the interplay between human host and pathogen in both evolutionary ecology and statistical epidemiology frameworks. There will be a discussion of ?Darwinian Medicine?. Specific bioterrorism pathogens will be discussed, as well as methods of identification and predictive modeling of a bioterrorism incident. In addition to lectures, class time will include practical data handling. Discussion of both methodological and substantive epidemiology papers from the recent literature will be led by the students.
GPH-GU 2930 Epidemiological Methods and Design Fall
This 3-unit course will cover in-depth, advancedmethods for modern epidemiologic study design, sampling, quantitative measurement, including reliability and validity, and statistical analysis appropriate for selected study designs relevant to global health research and practice. Considerations regarding the responsible conduct of research in international settings will be integrated throughout the course. This doctoral-level lecture/seminar course is offered to graduate students with a basic knowledge of epidemiologic and biostatistical principles, including causal inference, standard study design, confounding, bias, validity, and commonly-used analytical methods.
GPH-GU 2106 Epidemiology Summer Fall
Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of health and disease in different human populations and the application of methods to improve disease outcomes. As such, epidemiology is the basic science of public health. This course is designed to introduce students in all fields of public to the background, basic principles and methods of public health epidemiology. Topics covered include: measures of disease frequency; epidemiologic study designs, both experimental and non-experimental; understanding bias; and measures of effect and association. In addition, students will develop skills to read, interpret and evaluate health information from published epidemiological studies and mass media sources.
GPH-GU 5106 Epidemiology Fall
Introduces students to the field of public health epidemiology, emphasizing the sociocultural factors associated with the distribution and etiology of health and disease. Methodological skills including the calculation of rates, analysis of vital statistics, and programming data using a basic statistical package are covered.
GPH-GU 2375 Estimating Impacts of Policy Research Fall
This course covers selected analytic and design issues that are relevant to policy research and program evaluation. The course is not a comprehensive or exhaustive review of the field of policy-relevant research or program evaluation, nor is it a course in how to evaluate a program. The focus is on impact analysis (rather than process evaluation, performance monitoring, cost effectiveness analysis, or evaluation synthesis) To that end, there is a substantial amount of data analysis both in and out of class. There is also a significant amount of new statistical material presented. All of this is done using real world examples, to solidify the base as you build your career as a practitioner and consumer of the research that informs public policy.
GPH-GU 2190 Essentials of Public Health Biology Fall
This course introduces MPH students with minimal formal training in biology to the biological and molecular context of public health. The course provides an overview of: a) basic biological principles and mechanisms relevant to public health practice; and b) biomedical technology as applied in public health. The course covers basic principles of genetics, immunology, microbiology, and cell biology in the context of global public health. Areas covered include infectious diseases, genetic and chronic diseases, allostatic load, environmental factors affecting health, and prevention and treatment strategies.
GPH-GU 5190 Essentials of Public Health Biology Fall
This course introduces MPH students with minimal formal training in biology to the biological and molecular context of public health. The course provides an overview of: a) basic biological principles and mechanisms relevant to public health practice; and b) biomedical technology as applied in public health. The course covers basic principles of genetics, immunology, microbiology, and cell biology in the context of global public health. Areas covered include infectious diseases, genetic and chronic diseases, allostatic load, environmental factors affecting health, and prevention and treatment strategies.
CORE-GP 1021 Financial Management for Public, Nonprofit & Health Organizations Fall
This course provides an introduction to the use of financial information in organizational decision making. It teaches the theory and practice of how accounting information is generated and recorded, how the information is presented, and how it can be used to provide meaningful conclusions about the financial position and performance of a public service organization. It also teaches the use of principles of financial management to make operating and capital budgeting decisions and to analyze long-term financial alternatives. Topics covered include GAAP accounting, financial statements, financial condition analysis, present value, budgeting, and long-term asset and liability decision making.
GPH-GU 2217 Food Policy for Public Health Fall
The food system plays an essential role in public health by implicating nutrition, safety, environmental concerns, and sustainability. Food and its many aspects has become a mainstay of public health policy, popular discourse, and national debate. This course examines current health policy issues related to the modern food environment locally, nationally and internationally. The course provides background into how the U.S. government (federal, state, and local) can act in the area of food policy and it delves into topics related to nutritional guidelines, food programs, food safety, labeling, marketing, and pricing. We will additionally explore issues related to the food industry, the global nutrition transition, and agricultural and environmental food production concerns.
GPH-GU 2120 Foundations of Global Health Leadership Fall
The Integrative Seminar is an inter-disciplinary series designed to compliment the core courses and concentrations with a discussion oriented seminar that will permit exposure to global health leaders and in-depth exploration of the paradigms, perspectives, and policy challenges that shape action in global public health. The course will also include special intensive modules to build skills students will need as individuals, as part of interdisciplinary teams, and as organizational leaders who translate knowledge into effective action to improve global health. The style of the course will be heavily oriented towards peer and experiential learning. It will assume acThe Integrative Seminar is an inter-disciplinary series designed to compliment the core courses and concentrations with a discussion oriented seminar that will permit exposure to global health leaders and in-depth exploration of the paradigms, perspectives, and policy challenges that shape action in global public health. The course will also include special intensive modules to build skills students will need as individuals, as part of interdisciplinary teams, and as organizational leaders who translate knowledge into effective action to improve global health. The style of the course will be heavily oriented towards peer and experiential learning. It will assume active preparation and participation of all students to facilitate the lively discussion, debate and problem solving that are critical in an area of work that is relatively new and, therefore, contains ?contested knowledge?.
URPL-GP 2618 Geographic Information Systems and Analysis Fall
Understanding geographic relationships between people, land use, and resources is fundamental to planning. Urban planners routinely use spatial analysis to inform decision-making. This course will introduce students to Geographic Information Systems (GIS), a tool to analyze and visualize spatial data. The course will emphasize the core functions of GIS: map making, data management, and spatial analysis. Students will learn cartographic best practices, how to find and create spatial data, spatial analysis methodology, and how to approach problem solving from a geographic perspective. Throughout the course, students will build a portfolio of professional quality maps and data visualizations.
GPH-GU 2410 Global Burden of Infectious Disease Fall
Infectious diseases, especially HIV, TB, malaria and acute respiratory infections (ARI) contribute substantially to the global burden of disease. This course will focus on the biology, epidemiology and control of these infectious diseases. This is essential training for practitioners of global public health.
GPH-GU 2153 Global Environmental Health Fall
No description available
GPH-GU 5153 Global Environmental Health Fall
This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to and overview of the key areas of environmental health. Using the perspectives of the population and community, the course will cover factors associated with the development of environmental health problems. Students will gain an understanding of the interaction of individuals and communities with the environment, the potential impact on health of environmental agents, and specific applications of concepts of environmental health. The course will consist of a series of lectures and will cover principles derived from core environmental health disciplines. The sequence of major topics begins with background material and "tools of the trade" (i.e., environmental epidemiology and environmental toxicology). The course then covers human activities that lead to exposures to agents of environmental diseases, including chemical, physical, and microbial agents that originate in the environment and can impact human health.
GPH-GU 2315 Global Health and Economic Development Fall
An introduction to the issues of health and health care on a global basis. The course focuses on nature and scope of major worldwide health problems and the study of different national and international approaches to their solution.
GPH-GU 2334 Global Health Governance and Management Fall
No description available
GPH-GU 5171 Global Public Health Informatics Fall
Public Health Informatics is a new field that is concerned with the systematic application of information and computer sciences to practice, research and learning. This course is created to ensure that graduates of the program have working knowledge of information resources available for program planning, surveillance and data management and working knowledge in the use of evidence-based public health information tools that ensure use of current best practices and for lifelong learning.
GPH-GU 2140 Global Issues in Social & Behavioral Health Fall
This core course examines social, psychological and cultural factors that have an impact on public health in community, national and global contexts. These factors may include: population characteristics (social class, age, gender, culture, race/ethnicity), individual beliefs and behaviors, and socio-political systems and policies that affect public health problems and their solutions. Theories and perspectives drawn from sociology, anthropology, and psychology are applied to critical issues in global public health including the AIDs epidemic, mental illness, chronic disease, community violence, war and natural disaster trauma as well as behavioral health problems such as smoking and substance abuse.
GPH-GU 5140 Global Issues in Social and Behavioral Health Fall
This core course examines social, psychological and cultural factors that have an impact on public health in community, national and global contexts. These factors may include: population characteristics (social class, age, gender, culture, race/ethnicity), individual beliefs and behaviors, and socio-political systems and policies that affect public health problems and their solutions. Theories and perspectives drawn from sociology, anthropology, and psychology are applied to critical issues in global public health including the AIDS epidemic, mental illness, chronic disease, community violence, war and natural disaster trauma as well as behavioral health problems such as smoking and substance abuse.
GPH-GU 2230 Global Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology & Control Spring
This course will focus on the considerable and increasing burden of disease due to chronic diseases, mental health, substance use (alcohol, tobacco, other drugs), risk factors (obesity, lack of physical activity), and injuries within the developing world. It will present methods for measuring the burden of non-communicable disease, review approaches to program and service development to modify risk factors, present lessons learned from successful developing country programs, and discuss implications for health services development and international development policies.
GPH-GU 2285 Global Women's Health Programs - Analyzing/Evidence to Improve Women's Lives Spring
This course introduces the student to the major health issues facing women in low resource countries and how to analyze existing programs geared towards improving women's health. Students will learn how biological, environmental, and societal issues affect women's health, the outcomes of pregnancy, and child survival. Topics include reproductive and obstetric health, women's rights, gender-based violence, access to health education, family planning, female genital cutting, and the public health interventions proven to positively impact these issues. Students will intensively evaluate and analyze the interventions created to improve the lives of women and identify key elements that constitue an effective global women's health program. Students will learn the necessary skills to generate solutions to the complex circumstances affecting the health of women globally.
GPH-GU 2250 Health and Human Rights Fall
This course approaches global health and justice from international human rights and humanitarian law. The course is designed to provide public policy and public health students with the basis for literacy about human rights and humanitarian law. Through lectures, case studies and practical training, students will be able to gain knowledge and skills to determine how rights violations impact health, and how to engage in using the human rights approach to improve health outcomes. Topics, including HIV/AIDS, sexual and reproductive rights, the right to health in war and disasters, access to medicines and the ethical obligations of public health professionals, will be used to illustrate practical applications of human rights to global health.
HPAM-GP 4822 Healthcare Information Technology: Public Policy and Management Fall
This course describes the growing involvement of government in stimulating and directing the development of information technology in healthcare organizations. Included is a discussion of attempts to exchange information for the purposes of improving the quality of personal healthcare and public health. Methods for determining the financial value of information technology are described. Techniques for insuring the security and privacy of health information are presented. How information systems and technology can improve the quality of service provided to consumers and the clinical quality of health care is examined. Prerequisites: HPAM-GP.4833 or permission of instructor
GPH-GU 2405 Health Communications: Changing Social Norms in Theory and Practice Spring
The course provides an introduction about the theory, design, implementation, and evaluation of health communication programs. Several resources are used to allow students to acquire practical knowledge and skills in health communications planning and implementation. Case studies, resources, research tools and examples of different media channels are reviewed and analyzed to explore how to reach different target audiences with the most effective health communication interventions.
HPAM-GP 4830 Health Economics: Principles Fall
This course provides the core microeconomic theories and concepts needed to understand health and health care issues in both the developed and developing world. It describes how the markets for health and health services are different from other goods, with a particular emphasis on the role of government and market failure. In addition it discusses the theoretical and empirical aspects of key health economics issues, including the demand for health and health services, supply side concerns, health insurance, the provision of public goods, and related topics. The course encourages students to fundamentally and rigorously examine the role of the market for the provision of health and health services and how public policy can influence these markets. Prerequisites: CORE-GP.1011, CORE-GP.1018
GPH-GU 5110 Health Policy and Management 3, Fall Spring
<p>Governments bear significant responsibilities for assuring the health of their people. As our understanding of the social determinants of health has improved, exercising this responsibility calls for national policies that include planning for the personal health care system, addressing broader issues of population health services and links to policies that affect education, economic development, the environment, among other areas. All nations, especially developing countries and those in transition, face challenges to their national health strategies from the effects of globalization and global decision-making on issues that affect health. Government leaders must address not only health problems within their borders, but those that come across their borders. They must also interact with international organizations that affect global health. This course provides students with a comparative, cross-national overview to key issues, concepts and theories related to the planning, evaluation, financing, organization, management and reform of personal care and population-oriented health systems, worldwide. <em>This is an online course.</em></p>
APSTA-GE 2003 Interm Quantitative Methods: General Linear Model Fall
This course is designed to meet the data analytic needs of the doctoral students whose dissertation relies on the analysis of quantitative data. Procedures important to the data analyst are covered including data entry and definition, treating missing data, detecting outliers, and transforming distributions. First term topics include multiple regression, analysis of covariance, repeated measures analysis of variance, and multivariate analysis of variance and covariance. Second term topics emphasize categorical data analysis, odds, rations, standardization, log linear models, logistic regression. Other topics include multinominal logistic models, survival analysis, principle components, and factor analysis. The approach is conceptual with heavy reliance on computer software packages. Appropriate for doctoral students desiring specialized knowledge beyond the introductory sequence.
GPH-GU 2450 Intermediate Epidemiology Spring
This course will develop an understanding of epidemiologic concepts and methods that will be a backbone to in depth training in specialty areas. It will provide a technical and conceptual training in study design, multivariant analysis, sample size calculations and other key epidemiologic techniques. It will build on the basic core course.
GPH-GU 2383 International Population & Family Health Spring
A cross-cultural framework is used to compare the health status of populations and families and factors that affect their health in societal subgroups (for example, urban, rural, poor, women and children, and the elderly). The course emphasizes the effects of secular changes in women's roles and status and other societal, economic, and environmental trends on population and family health.
GPH-GU 2360 Internship: Practice ​and Integrative Learning Experiences Fall
Supervised field experience providing an opportunity to apply public health skills in community health settings. Locations may include government agencies, hospitals, professional associations, voluntary health agencies, businesses, industries, and international agencies. Placement selection may focus on special topics such as infectious or chronic disease prevention, substance abuse, family planning, and food, environment, and health systems.
GPH-GU 2115 Introduction to Principles of Nutrition in Public Health Fall
This course will cover the basic concepts of the science of nutrition detailing the nutrients, food sources, function and nutritional requirements. The course will integrate the nutritional needs of populations, both nationally and globally, with emphasis on undernutrition, over nutrition and the double burden of malnutrition. The principles of nutritional needs will be applied to promoting health in vulnerable populations.
GPH-GU 2145 Introduction to Public Health Systems: Management and Policy Issues Fall
This course introduces students to key issues, concepts and practices in the field of public health management and policy. We examine the organization, management and performance of public health departments and systems. The course emphasizes the need for leaders in today’s world of public health to understand central issues in both public health policy and management and, importantly, how these interact. The overall goal of the course is to promote students’ understanding of, and ability to analyze, fundamental issues and ideas that are central to public health systems and to develop students’ skills for a range of careers in public health management and policy.
GPH-GU 2357 LGBT Health Disparities Spring
This course examines the core interdisciplinary theories, knowledge, research, and methods evidenced in in understanding LGBTQ health and disparities evidences in the LGBTQ population. The course introduces students to the main conceptual frameworks for the study of LGBTQ individuals, communities, and populations across the lifespan and overviews existing knowledge about LGBTQ health in the United States and globally. The course highlights research design, measurement, ethics, and analysis issues in population research in LGBTQ health.
GPH-GU 2950 Methods in Community Health Research Fall
This course will focus on qualitative and mixed methods used in community health research. Research in communities and natural (non-laboratory) settings requires flexibility and adaptability, especially when conducted in global sites where conditions are dynamic and often uncontrolled. Types of inquiry include needs assessments (including rapid assessment), program evaluation, and participatory or action research. Qualitative methods such as ethnographic observation and in-depth interviews (individual or focus group) may be used alone or in combination with quantitative surveys and analyses of clinical or administrative data. Community-based participatory research, photo-voice, mapping and other field techniques will be included as well as the design and conduct of community-engaged interventions. This advanced course assumes the student has had previous coursework in research design and data collection in both quantitative and qualitative methods.
CORE-GP 1018 Microeconomics for Public Management, Planning & Policy Analysis Fall
The concepts and tools of microeconomics and their relevance for management, planning, and policy making in the public and nonprofit sectors. Basic theory of demand, production, markets, and distribution. Individual markets and the economic system. Efficiency and social welfare outcomes and failures of a market system.
GPH-GU 2210 Migration & Health Spring
This course will provide an overview of key topics in public health for migratory persons: demographics; specific population groups and their circumstances and rights, including refugees, immigrants, asylees, and migrants; epidemiologic issues of displaced persons, including the shifting burden of disease, nutrition, environmental and occupational concerns; health and human rights; ethics; torture and other violence; PTSD, and other acute and chronic mental health concerns. Immigrant and Migratory Health will be approached from various perspectives, including historical, demographic, epidemiologic, access(economic, legal, linguistic, cultural, and institutional), life cycle, environment, including occupation and nutrition, and policy. The course will impart to students the skills necessary to develop an integrated approach to the care of immigrant and migratory populations.
APSTA-GE 2040 Multi-Level Modeling Growth Curve Fall
This is a course on models for multi-level growth curve data. These data arise in longitudinal designs, which are quite common to education and applied social, behavioral and policy science. Traditional methods, such as OLS regression, are not appropriate in this settings, as they fail to model the complex correlational structure that is induced by these designs. Proper inference requires that we include aspects of the design in the model itself. Moreover, these more sophisticated techniques allow the researcher to learn new and important characteristics of the social and behavioral processes under study. In this module, we will develop and fit a set of models for longitudinal designs (these are often called growth curve models). The course assignments will use state of the art statistical software to explore, fit and interpret the models.
GPH-GU 2275 Nutrition Epidemiology for Public Health Spring
This course provides an overview of the basics of nutrition epidemiology. The course provides in-depth knowledge of the principles and challenges inherent to the discipline of nutritional epidemiology, and provides an overview of the tools needed to plan observational and interventional studies in human populations. The course addresses collection, analysis, and interpretation of data on dietary intake and nutritional status within diverse populations, and places strong emphasis on methodological considerations in study design, and pertinent statistical issues, including measurement errors. Students will gain an appreciation for how the fields of nutrition, physiology, biochemistry and statistics are integrated into nutritional epidemiology. The course will discuss emerging topics in nutritional epidemiology, its future potential and priorities, and translation of scientific findings into recommendations and policy.
GPH-GU 2240 Perspectives In Global Mental Fall
Common mental disorders such as depression, anxiety and substance use disorders are leading causes of disease burden in the world today, rivaling HIV, malaria and heart disease in that respect. They are associated with serious functional impairment, reduced quality of life, unemployment and homelessness and exacerbate risk for, and severity of, medical illness. Yet they tend to get lost on the global health agenda. Lack of familiarity with interventions, measuring challenges, and stigma are, in part, to blame. Public health approaches to common mental disorders are also only recently demonstrating new rigor and maturity. This course provides exposure to this increasingly relevant public health challenge from a global perspective, with a particular focus on the epidemiology, risk factors and consequences, individual- and population-level approaches to treatment and prevention, and delivery of care for mental health problems in different settings worldwide. This course will challenge students to think critically about the existing literature in this area and about the role of culture, context and stigma in shaping public health responses to mental disorders.
GPH-GU 2371 Program Analysis and Evaluation Fall
Program evaluation is a critical component in designing and operating effective programs. Evaluations supply information to policymakers and program managers that can assist them in making decisions about which programs to fund, modify, expand or eliminate. Evaluation can be an accountability toolProgram evaluation is a critical component in designing and operating effective programs. Evaluations supply information to policymakers and program managers that can assist them in making decisions about which programs to fund, modify, expand or eliminate. Evaluation can be an accountability tool for program managers and funders. This course serves as an introduction to evaluation methodology and evaluation tools commonly used to assess publicly funded programs. Students will become familiar with the concepts, methods and applications of evaluation research; learn how to read evaluation research critically; understand how to use evaluation results to anticipate or improve program performance; and be able to propose an appropriate evaluation plan to assess the implementation and effectiveness of a program.
PADM-GP 2171 Program Analysis and Evaluation Fall
This course serves as an introduction to those evaluation tools most commonly used to assess the performance of publicly funded programs, in both the public and private sector. Topics include developing and assessing program theory, implementation and process assessment, methods of impact evaluation, and efficiency analysis (cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis). The focus is on critical analysis and understanding of both the underlying programs and their evaluations.
GPH-GU 2349 Program Planning and Evaluation Fall
Research methods for identification of population-based needs for public health intervention, development of programs to meet those needs, and evaluation of the effectiveness of the intervention. Application of research methods to proposal writing, budget, planning, project management, and methods of program evaluation. Students research the need for a public health intervention through a formal needs assessment, conduct the intervention, evaluate its impact, and describe these events in a formal paper and presentation. This research project in the culminating experience for the program.
GPH-GU 2345 Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response - A Global Perspective Spring
This course will contrast US and international approaches to public health emergency preparedness and response. Rotating among different sites within NYU's Global Network, the course will focus on aspects of public health emergencies systems germane to the host country. In Tel Aviv, we will focus on the planning and deployment of international humanitarian aid missions, preparedness and response to terrorism, public health ethical issues that arise in conflict situations, and disaster mental health and community resilience. The course will also review principles of surveillance, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery from natural and man-made emergency events, and cover both US and international emergency management and public health frameworks.
GPH-GU 2255 Psychoactive Drug Use and Public Health Summer
This course provides an overview of the epidemiology, public health issues and international policies related to psychoactive drugs, including tobacco, alcohol and prescription drugs, as well as numerous commonly used illicit drugs. World Health Organization (WHO) and US policy and programs provide a general reference for efforts by countries worldwide to decrease the burdens of mortality and morbidity secondary to psychoactive drug use. In addition, pharmacological properties and effects of drugs are reviewed and linked to health, economic and societal problems. Best clinical practices in prevention and treatment and controversies over management of addiction will be discussed, along with ethical issues of interest to health providers and public health practitioners.
GPH-GU 2225 Psychometric Measurement and Analysis in Public Health Research and Practice Fall
*Students will examine the principles of measurement and testing as applied to public health research and practice, including the technical interpretation of test scores using the classical test model. Content of the course will consider individual measures of constructs and behaviors measured in public health research and practice. Students will examine and deconstruct principles and techniques used in psychometric studies to establish levels of reliability and validity and will utilize statistical software to conduct analyses. *
GPH-GU 2160 Qualitative & Field Methods Spring Fall
This course is devoted to flexible forms of inquiry suited to the local context of global public health research. Sometimes known as ?action research?, ?rapid assessment, and ?community-based participatory research? these approaches share a commitment to working closely with and in communities to identify health risks and effective interventions for ameliorating them. Although field research may include surveys and other forms of quantitative research, the emphasis in this class will be on qualitative methods with mixed method approaches included where appropriate. The focus will be on introducing the basic content/skills of on-the-ground field research under challenging conditions, i.e., shortages of time and resources as well as cultural/ linguistic differences. There are additional aspects to learning these methods (e.g., data analysis) that require much more time and skill development than is possible in this brief introductory course. Interested students are strongly advised to take additional coursework in qualitative methods.
PADM-GP 4114 Surveys and Interviews Fall
The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of how surveys and interviews can be used to generate knowledge. This course will cover the design and implementation of survey and interview protocols, the data collection, analysis, and interpretation process, and the presentation of results. Students will learn how to design and implement these instruments for a variety of purposes and for different settings in support of their capstone projects or other research projects.
GPH-GU 5175 Readings in the History & Philosophy of Public Health I 0 Fall
This non-credit bearing course introduces students to important public health readings exploring the field of public health in global perspective from the 19th century to the present. In advance of each course session, the instructors will post discussion questions based on the assigned readings. Students are expected to come to class prepared to discuss the questions. All MPH students are required to complete 3 of these non-credit bearing courses prior to graduation. The successful completion of three or more of these course sessions will lead towards achieving this critical content as described by ASPPH for the 21st century MPH: "History and philosophy of public health as well as its core values, concepts, functions, and leadership roles.
GPH-GU 5180 Readings in The History & Philosophy of Public Health II 0 Spring
This non-credit bearing course will require students to read and discuss important global public health books exploring the evolution of the field of public health in global perspective from the 19th century to the present. All MPH students will be required to complete 3 of these non-credit bearing courses prior to graduation. For each of these course sessions, a book will be discussed in a public lecture by its author; students are expected to read the book in advance, responding with a “forum” posting on the "NYU Classes” website one week in advance of the lecture, including a question raised by the book about public health. Questions will be collected and forwarded to our author-speakers in advance of their public lectures. The lecture and Q&A will be chaired by a member of the GIPH faculty and will last for two hours. Students are expected to sign up for/ complete the reading and written response/ attend the lecture for at least three books in the history of global public health over the semesters in which they are earning their graduate degrees. The successful completion of three or more of these course sessions will lead towards the achieving this critical content as described by ASPPH for the 21st century MPH: “History and philosophy of public health as well as its core values, concepts, functions, and leadership roles.”
GPH-GU 5185 Readings in the History and Philosophy of Public Health III 0 Spring
This non-credit bearing course will require students to read and discuss important global public health books exploring the evolution of the field of public health in global perspective from the 19th century to the present. All MPH students will be required to complete 3 of these non-credit bearing courses prior to graduation. For each of these course sessions, a book will be discussed in a public lecture by its author; students are expected to read the book in advance, responding with a “forum”posting on the "NYU Classes” website one week in advance of the lecture, including a question raised by the book about public health. Questions will be collected and forwarded to our author-speakers in advance of their public lectures. The lecture and Q&A will be chaired by a member of the GIPH faculty and will last for two hours. Students are expected to sign up for/ complete the reading and written response/ attend the lecture for at least three books in the history of global public health over the semesters in which they are earning their graduate degrees. The successful completion of three or more of these course sessions will lead towards the achieving this critical content as described by ASPPH for the 21st century MPH: “History and philosophy of public health as well as its core values, concepts, functions, and leadership roles.
GPH-GU 2361 Research Methods in Public Health Spring
Review of research and original writings related to public health. Application of research methodology to problems in public health.
GPH-GU 2960 Theories in Public Health, Practice, Policy & Research Spring Fall
The ‘intervention imperative’ in public health has traditionally overshadowed theory development (Connelly, 2005; Potvin et al., 2005). Consequently, many public health practices and interventions are predicated upon unexamined or under-theorized assumptions about etiology. As the scope of public health expanded beyond infectious diseases, its theoretical foundations extended beyond biomedical ‘germ theory’ explanations to include behavioral psychology. By the late 20th century, these foundations grew to incorporate multi-factorial etiologies and systems approaches borrowing from social science theories and methods. This course examines an array of paradigms, theories and conceptual models used in public health. These will be roughly categorized into the following domains: a) biomedical; b) psychological; c) organizational; d) socio-cultural; and e) structural /critical. Specific public health problems—HIV/AIDS, cancer and mental disorders—will be examined using relevant theories. Emphasis will be on adopting a comparative, critical and integrative (biopsychosocial) perspective on theories and key concepts in public health practice, policy and research.
GPH-GU 2686 Thesis I: Practice ​and Integrative Learning Experiences Fall
This course (part of a two-semester series; Thesis I and Thesis II) introduces the thesis as the culminating experience for MPH candidates in the Epidemiology (EPI), Public Health Policy and Management (PHPM), and Social and Behavioral Science (SBS) tracks, and allows students to develop skills in conducting public health research, analyzing and interpreting data and presenting study findings. The thesis is intended to reflect the training students have received in the MPH program and demonstrate their ability to integrate, synthesize, and apply the knowledge and skills from coursework and practicum experiences to a real world public health problem or issue that is relevant to their major field of interest. In Thesis I students will also have the opportunity to reflect on their practice experiences, most often in the site from which the thesis is drawn. The course provides students with the knowledge and skills to develop and refine research questions, conduct a comprehensive review and analysis of the literature relevant to the topic of interest, select a theory or organizing framework, outline the methods, formulate a plan for data collection and analysis, and develop an annotated outline of the project.
GPH-GU 2687 Thesis II: Practice ​and Integrative Learning Experiences Spring
This is the second course in a two-course series that continues work on the culminating activity, the thesis, for MPH candidates in the Epidemiology (EPI), Public Health Policy and Management (PHPM), and Social and Behavioral Science (SBS) tracks. The focus of the course is on completing the proposed thesis product (e.g., journal style manuscript, research proposal, program development proposal, proposal for evaluation research study) and preparing for the presentation of the final project. Students will work closely with their Faculty Sponsor during the semester, but the course instructor will provide guidance on the aforementioned sections of the thesis. The thesis should demonstrate the student’s ability to think critically, provide understanding and insight into a substantive area of inquiry, and convey ideas effectively to an intended audience.
EHSC-GA 1006 Toxicology Fall
Introduction to the science of toxicology, stressing basic concepts essential to understanding the action of exogenous chemical agents on biological systems. Principles underlying the absorption, metabolism, and elimination of chemicals are discussed. Toxicokinetics, specific classes of toxic responses, and experimental methods used to assess toxicity are also examined.
GPH-GU 2319 Writing Grants and Funding Proposals for Health-Related Programs Spring
A hands-on approach to grant writing including development of skills in locating potential funding sources and the use of appropriate grant-writing style & technique. Students are guided through the development of a grant proposal, from locating sources of funds; through development of program objectives, background, & methods; to the peer review process.