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Danielle Ompad

Danielle Ompad

Danielle Ompad

Associate Professor of Epidemiology

Professional overview

Dr. Danielle Ompad is an epidemiologist whose work is focused in the areas of urban health, HIV, illicit drug use, and adult access to vaccines. With respect to illicit drug use, her work has spanned the entire natural history of addiction – from initiation to cessation, with particular attention paid to risk for infectious diseases such as HIV, hepatitis B and C, and STIs.  She has primarily worked with people who use heroin, crack, cocaine, and/or club drugs.  

In New York City, she has been examining heroin cessation among current, former, and relapsed heroin users. Working with Alliance for Public Health and the Ukrainian Institute on Public Health Policy, she analyzes harm reduction service utilization among people who inject drugs, in order to optimize service delivery in Ukraine.  Since 2013, she has served as faculty for the Fogarty-funded New York State International Training and Research Program with the goal of building research capacity in Ukraine.

Dr. Ompad’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases-funded study aims to determine if herpes simplex 1 and 2 infections explain racial disparities in HIV incidence among a cohort of young gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (YMSM).  In addition, Dr. Ompad and colleagues are assessing HPV infection prevalence, persistence, and clearance among this same cohort.

Education
BS, Biology, Bowie State University, Bowie, MD
MHS, Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
PhD, Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
Honors and awards
Excellence in Public Health Teaching Award, New York University (2014)
Excellence in Public Health Teaching Award, New York University (2013)
National Hispanic Science Network on Drug Abuse Scientific Development Travel Fellowship (2010)
Delta Omega Honorary Society, Alpha Chapter (2002)
Areas of research and study
Epidemiology
HIV/AIDS
Infectious Diseases
Social Determinants of Health
STIs
Substance Abuse
Vaccines
Publications

Continuing Links Between Substance Use and HIV Highlight the Importance of Nursing Roles

Deren, S., Naegle, M., Hagan, H., & Ompad, D.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care
10.1016/j.jana.2017.03.005
Abstract

Links between HIV and substance use were identified early in the U.S. HIV epidemic. People who use drugs are at risk of HIV infection through shared injection equipment and risky sexual behaviors. In addition, substance use has negative health consequences for people living with HIV. The prescription opioid misuse epidemic, linked to injection drug use, hepatitis C infection, and HIV, poses a new threat to declining HIV rates. We reviewed evidence-based interventions that decrease HIV risk in people who use drugs (needle/syringe programs, medication-assisted treatment, engagement in HIV care, and preexposure prophylaxis/postexposure prophylaxis). The critical roles of nurses in HIV prevention/care for this population are described, including applying the principles of harm reduction, screening for substance use, and undertaking implementation and research efforts. As the nation's largest health care profession, nurses are positioned to contribute to the quality of HIV-related prevention/care for people who use drugs and to lead practice initiatives.

Neighborhood determinants of mood and anxiety disorders among men who have sex with men in New York City

Cerdá, M., Nandi, V., Frye, V., Egan, J.E., Rundle, A., Quinn, J.W., … Koblin, B.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology

Page(s)

1-12
10.1007/s00127-017-1379-8
Abstract

Purpose: We examined the relationship between economic, physical, and social characteristics of neighborhoods, where men who have sex with men (MSM) lived and socialized, and symptom scores of depression and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Methods: Participants came from a cross-sectional study of a population-based sample of New York City MSM recruited in 2010–2012 (n = 1126). Archival and survey-based data were obtained on neighborhoods, where the men lived and where they socialized most often. Results: MSM who socialized in neighborhoods with more economic deprivation and greater general neighborhood attachment experienced higher GAD symptoms. The relationship between general attachment to neighborhoods where MSM socialized and mental health depended on the level of gay community attachment: in neighborhoods characterized by greater gay community attachment, general neighborhood attachment was negatively associated with GAD symptoms, while in low gay community attachment neighborhoods, general neighborhood attachment had a positive association with GAD symptoms. Conclusions: This study illustrates the downsides of having deep ties to social neighborhoods when they occur in the absence of broader access to ties with the community of one’s sexual identity. Interventions that help MSM cross the spatial boundaries of their social neighborhoods and promote integration of MSM into the broader gay community may contribute to the reduction of elevated rates of depression and anxiety in this population.

Patterns of harm reduction service utilization and HIV incidence among people who inject drugs in Ukraine: A two-part latent profile analysis

Ompad, D., Wang, J., Dumchev, K., Barska, J., Samko, M., Zeziulin, O., … DeHovitz, J.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

International Journal of Drug Policy

Volume

43

Page(s)

7-15
10.1016/j.drugpo.2016.12.008
Abstract

Background Program utilization patterns are described within a large network of harm reduction service providers in Ukraine. The relationship between utilization patterns and HIV incidence is determined among people who inject drugs (PWID) controlling for oblast-level HIV incidence and treatment/syringe coverage. Methods Data were extracted from the network's monitoring and evaluation database (January 2011–September 2014, n = 327,758 clients). Latent profile analysis was used to determine harm reduction utilization patterns using the number of HIV tests received annually and the number of condoms, syringes, and services (i.e., information and counseling sessions) received monthly over a year. Cox proportional hazards regression determined the relations between HIV seroconversion and utilization class membership. Results In the final 4-class model, class 1 (34.0% of clients) received 0.1 HIV tests, 1.3 syringes, 0.6 condom and minimal counseling and information sessions per month; class 2 (33.6%) received 8.6 syringes, 3.2 condoms, and 0.5 HIV tests and counseling and information sessions; class 3 (19.1%) received 1 HIV test, 11.9 syringes, 4.3 condoms, and 0.7 information and counseling sessions; class 4 (13.3%) received 1 HIV test, 26.1 syringes, 10.3 condoms, and 1.8 information and 1.9 counseling sessions. Class 4 clients had significantly decreased risk for HIV seroconversion as compared to those in class 1 after controlling for oblast-level characteristics. Conclusion Injection drug use continues to be a major mode of HIV transmission in Ukraine, making evaluation of harm reduction efforts in reducing HIV incidence among PWID critical. These analyses suggest that receiving more syringes and condoms decreased risk of HIV. Scaling up HIV testing and harm reduction services is warranted.

Substance Use and Cognitive Function as Drivers of Condomless Anal Sex among HIV-Positive Gay, Bisexual, and Other Men Who Have Sex with Men Aged 50 and Older: The Gold Studies

Kupprat, S.A., Krause, K.D., Ompad, D., & Halkitis, P.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

LGBT Health

Volume

4

Page(s)

434-441
10.1089/lgbt.2016.0163
Abstract

Purpose: Substance use has been linked to the sexual transmission of HIV among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) across the lifespan. Among older, HIV-positive, MSM populations, cognitive dysfunction associated with age and HIV disease progression also may play a role in sexual risk-taking. People aged 50 years and older represent a growing proportion of the overall HIV-positive population. This study aimed to explore relationships between substance use and cognitive function, and their impact on condomless anal sex (CAS) among HIV-positive gay, bisexual, and other MSM aged 50 years and older. Methods: Data from a cross-sectional study of HIV-positive MSM, aged 50 and older (N = 169) were gathered using a computer-assisted survey, researcher-administered behavioral and neurocognitive measures. Results: More than 50% of the men used substances and had one or more cognitive impairments. However, only 25% were at higher risk for dementia (i.e., two or more cognitive impairments). Multivariable modeling indicated that use of alcohol to intoxication and date of HIV diagnosis were the strongest predictors of CAS in both a model that included dementia risk and a model that included impaired executive function risk. Current illicit substance use was a significant predictor of CAS only in the model that included dementia risk. Those with better cognitive and executive function had higher odds of CAS. However, only executive function was a significant cognitive predictor of CAS. Conclusion: Further research is needed to clarify the impact of cognitive function and substance use on sexual risk behaviors as these HIV-positive men achieve normal life expectancies, while continuing to use substances and engage in CAS. Furthermore, addiction treatment remains a critical need for this group even as they transition into later adulthood.

Trends in Injection Risk Behaviors among People Who Inject Drugs and the Impact of Harm Reduction Programs in Ukraine, 2007–2013

Makarenko, I., Ompad, D., Sazonova, Y., Saliuk, T., DeHovitz, J., & Gensburg, L.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Journal of Urban Health

Page(s)

1-11
10.1007/s11524-016-0119-9
Abstract

The study examined trends in injection risk behaviors among people who inject drugs (PWIDs) and assessed the impact of harm reduction programs in Ukraine during 2007–2013. We performed a secondary analysis of the data collected in serial cross-sectional bio-behavioral surveillance surveys administered with PWIDs in Ukraine in 2007, 2008, 2011, and 2013. Using data from 14 Ukrainian cities, we assessed short-term trends in injection risk behaviors with the Cochran-Armitage test for trend and multivariable logistic regression models, adjusted for age, sex, region, marital status, education level, occupation, age at injection drug use initiation, experience of overdose, and self-reported HIV status. The overall test for trend indicated a statistically significant decrease over time for sharing needle/syringe during the last injection (p < 0.0001), sharing needle/syringe at least once in the last 30 days (p < 0.0001), and using a common container for drug preparation (p < 0.0001). The prevalence of injecting drugs from pre-loaded syringes was high (61.0%) and did not change over the study period. After adjusting for all significant confounders and comparing to 2007, the prevalence of sharing needle/syringe during the last injection was unchanged in 2008 (OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.92, 1.21), and declined in 2011 (OR = 0.18, 95% CI = 0.15, 0.22) and 2013 (OR = 0.17, 95% CI = 0.14, 0.21). Sharing needles/syringes in the last 30 days significantly decreased when compared to that in 2007 (2008: OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.74, 0.89; 2011: OR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.38, 0.47; and 2013: OR = 0.31, 95% CI = 0.27, 0.35). The prevalence of using common instruments for drug preparation also decreased compared to that in 2007 (2008: OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.85, 0.91; 2011: OR = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.85, 0.90; and 2013: OR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.71, 0.76). The observed reduction in the prevalence of injection risk behavior over time is encouraging. Our findings suggest that prevention programs in Ukraine have positive impact and provide support for governmental expansion of these programs.

A Qualitative Investigation Comparing Psychosocial and Physical Sexual Experiences Related to Alcohol and Marijuana Use among Adults

Palamar, J.J., Acosta, P., Ompad, D., & Friedman, S.R.

Publication year

2016

Journal title

Archives of Sexual Behavior

Page(s)

1-14
10.1007/s10508-016-0782-7
Abstract

Alcohol and marijuana are two of the most prevalent psychoactive substances and each may result in distinct psychosocial and physical sexual experiences and different sexual risk behaviors. With marijuana becoming more accepted in the US along with more liberal state-level policies, it is important to examine and compare users’ psychosocial and physical sexual experiences and sexual risk behavior associated with these drugs. In this study, we interviewed 24 adults who recently used marijuana before sex. Participants were 50 % female and all self-identified as heterosexual and HIV-negative. Using thematic analysis, we compared self-reported psychosocial and physical sexual experiences of alcohol and marijuana. Participants described differences between drugs with regard to psychosocial (e.g., partner interactions and contexts before sex, partner choice, perceived attractiveness of self and others, disinhibition, and feelings of regret after sex) and physical sexual experiences (e.g., sexual dysfunction, dose effects, sensations of body/sex organs, length and intensity of sex, and orgasm). Alcohol use was commonly associated with social outgoingness and use facilitated connections with potential sexual partners; however, alcohol was more likely than marijuana to lead to atypical partner choice or post-sex regret. Both alcohol and marijuana had a variety of negative sexual effects, and the illegality of marijuana reportedly facilitated intimate encounters. While sexual experiences tended to be similar across males and females, we did find some variation by gender. Results can inform prevention and harm reduction programming that will allow us to design more realistic programs and to craft interventions, which guide potential users to make safer choices.

Associations Among Neighborhood Characteristics and Sexual Risk Behavior Among Black and White MSM Living in a Major Urban Area

Frye, V., Nandi, V., Egan, J.E., Cerda, M., Rundle, A., Quinn, J.W., … Koblin, B.

Publication year

2016

Journal title

AIDS and Behavior

Page(s)

1-21
10.1007/s10461-016-1596-2
Abstract

Identifying neighborhood characteristics associated with sexual HIV risk behavior among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM) living in urban areas may inform the development of policies and programs to reduce risk and subsequently HIV prevalence in urban areas. New York City M2M was a cross-sectional study designed to identify neighborhood-level characteristics associated with sexual risk behaviors among MSM living in New York City. This paper presents results of an analysis of neighborhood-level indicators of three distinct social theories of influence of the neighborhood environment on human behavior: physical disorder, social disorganization and social norms theories. Using multilevel modeling on a sample of 766 MSM stratified by race/ethnicity, we found little support for the role of social disorganization on the sexual risk behavior of MSM, whereas different indicators of physical disorder exerted negative effects across race groups. Our results suggest that the beneficial effects of housing stock maintenance and general neighborhood physical orderliness and cleanliness may have positive effects beyond those traditionally studied for African American MSM and that the field needs novel theorizing regarding whether and how neighborhood or virtual community-level factors relate to sexual behavior among MSM.

Beyond METs: Types of physical activity and depression among older adults

Joshi, S., Mooney, S.J., Kennedy, G.J., Benjamin, E.O., Ompad, D., Rundle, A.G., … Cerdá, M.

Publication year

2016

Journal title

Age and Ageing

Volume

45

Page(s)

103-109
10.1093/ageing/afv164
Abstract

Background/Objectives: physical activity may be beneficial in reducing depression incidence among the elderly. A key unanswered question is whether certain types of physical activity are particularly associated with decreased depression incidence. We examined the relationship between quantity and type of physical activity and subsequent depression using longitudinal data from elderly adults in New York City (NYC). Methods: we followed 3,497 adults aged 65-75 living in NYC for three years. Total physical activity was measured using the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) and type of physical activity was measured using a latent class analysis of PASE item responses. We used generalised estimating equations to measure the relationship between quantity and latent class of physical activity at waves 1-2 and depression at waves 2-3, controlling for wave-1 depression. Results: individuals in the second highest quartile (50-75%) (odds ratio (OR) = 0.45; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.23, 0.88) and highest quartile of activity (OR = 0.31; 95% CI = 0.16, 0.63) had lower odds of depression. Among all subjects, athletic types (OR = 0.25; 95% CI = 0.12, 0.51) and walker types (OR = 0.58; 95% CI = 0.34, 0.99) had lower odds of depression. Among non-disabled participants, walkers (OR = 0.36; 95% CI = 0.18, 0.73), athletic types (OR = 0.14; 95% CI = 0.06, 0.32), domestic/gardening types (OR = 0.29; 95% CI = 0.12, 0.73) and domestic/gardening athletic types (OR = 0.13; 95% CI = 0.02, 0.75) had lower odds of depression. Conclusion: respondents who practised the highest levels of physical activity and who performed athletic activities were at lower risk for depression. Interventions aimed at promoting athletic physical activity among older adults may generate benefits for mental health.

Congruence of Home, Social and Sex Neighborhoods among Men Who Have Sex with Men, NYCM2M Study

Koblin, B.A., Egan, J.E., Nandi, V., Sang, J.M., Cerdá, M., Tieu, H.V., … Frye, V.

Publication year

2016

Journal title

Journal of Urban Health

Page(s)

1-17
10.1007/s11524-016-0074-5
Abstract

Substantial literature demonstrates the influence of the neighborhood environment on health behaviors and outcomes. But limited research examines on how gay and bisexual men experience and exist in various geographic and virtual spaces and how this relates to their sexual behavior. New York City Men 2 Men (NYCM2M) was a cross-sectional study designed to identify neighborhood-level characteristics within the urban environment that influence sexual risk behaviors, substance use, and depression among men who have sex with men (MSM) living in NYC. The sample was recruited using a modified venue-based time-space sampling methodology and through select websites and mobile applications. Whether key neighborhoods of human activity, where a participant resided (termed home), socialized (termed social), or had sex most often (termed sex), were the same or different was evaluated. “Congruence” (or the sameness) of home, social, and most often sex neighborhood was reported by 17 % of men, while 30 % reported that none of their neighborhoods were the same. The largest group of men (39 %) reported that their home and sex neighborhoods were the same but their social neighborhood was different while 10 % reported that their home neighborhood was different than their social and sex neighborhood; 5 % men reported same home and social neighborhoods with a different sex neighborhood. Complete neighborhood incongruence was highest among men who were Black and/or Latino, had lower education and personal income levels, and had greater financial insecurity. In adjusted analysis, serodiscordant condomless anal intercourse and condomless anal intercourse with partners from the Internet or mobile applications were significantly associated with having the same social and sex (but not home) neighborhoods. Understanding the complexity of how different spaces and places relate to the health and sexual behavior of MSM is essential for focusing interventions to best reach various populations of interest.

Disparities within the Disparity – Determining HIV Risk Factors among Latino Gay and Bisexual Men Attending a Community-Based Clinic in Los Angeles, California

Beymer, M.R., Weiss, R.E., Halkitis, P., Kapadia, F., Ompad, D., Bourque, L., & Bolan, R.K.

Publication year

2016

Journal title

Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
10.1097/QAI.0000000000001072
Abstract

BACKGROUND:: Latino gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States have a 50% greater incidence of HIV when compared to White MSM. Previous studies have analyzed factors contributing to condomless anal intercourse (CAI) among Latino MSM, but few studies have followed cohorts of HIV-negative Latino MSM to determine circumstances for HIV infection. Informed by Syndemics Theory, we examine behavioral, biological, and contextual factors associated with HIV infection for Latino MSM. METHODS:: Risk assessment and HIV testing data were analyzed for all initially HIV-negative, Latino MSM (n = 3,111) visiting a community-based clinic in Los Angeles, California from January 2009 to June 2014. Survival analyses were used to determine characteristics of Latino MSM who became HIV-positive during the study timeframe. RESULTS:: Similar to previous studies of MSM, self-reported history of Chlamydia, Gonorrhea and/or Syphilis (aHR: 1.97; CI: 1.28-3.04), receptive CAI (aHR: 1.7; CI: 1.16-2.49), and methamphetamine use (aHR: 1.99; CI: 1.15-3.43) predicted HIV infection. In addition, originating from Central America (aHR: 2.31; CI: 1.41-3.79), Latino ethnicity of the last sex partner (aHR: 1.67; CI: 1.16-2.39), and experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) (aHR: 1.73; CI: 1.13-2.64) were also associated with HIV infection among Latino MSM. CONCLUSIONS:: This is the first study to show independent associations between IPV and HIV infection among Latino MSM. This study shows that psychosocial conditions such as IPV fuel HIV incidence among Latino MSM, and psychosocial interventions should be considered to reduce HIV disparities among Latino MSM.

Do Sexual Networks of Men Who Have Sex with Men in New York City Differ by Race/Ethnicity?

Tieu, H.V., Nandi, V., Hoover, D.R., Lucy, D., Stewart, K., Frye, V., … Koblin, B.A.

Publication year

2016

Journal title

AIDS Patient Care and STDs

Volume

30

Page(s)

39-47
10.1089/apc.2015.0237
Abstract

The United States HIV epidemic disproportionately affects Black and Hispanic men who have sex with men (MSM). This disparity might be partially explained by differences in social and sexual network structure and composition. A total of 1267 MSM in New York City completed an ACASI survey and egocentric social and sexual network inventory about their sex partners in the past 3 months, and underwent HIV testing. Social and sexual network structure and composition were compared by race/ethnicity of the egos: black, non-Hispanic (N = 365 egos), white, non-Hispanic (N = 466), and Hispanic (N = 436). 21.1% were HIV-positive by HIV testing; 17.2% reported serodiscordant and serostatus unknown unprotected anal/vaginal intercourse (SDUI) in the last 3 months. Black MSM were more likely than white and Hispanic MSM to report exclusively having partners of same race/ethnicity. Black and Hispanic MSM had more HIV-positive and unknown status partners than white MSM. White men were more likely to report overlap of social and sex partners than black and Hispanic men. No significant differences by race/ethnicity were found for network size, density, having concurrent partners, or having partners with ≥10 years age difference. Specific network composition characteristics may explain racial/ethnic disparities in HIV infection rates among MSM, including HIV status of sex partners in networks and lack of social support within sexual networks. Network structural characteristics such as size and density do not appear to have such an impact. These data add to our understanding of the complexity of social factors affecting black MSM and Hispanic MSM in the U.S.

Drug use among HIV+ adults aged 50 and older: findings from the GOLD II study

Ompad, D., Giobazolia, T.T., Barton, S.C., Halkitis, S.N., Boone, C.A., Halkitis, P., … Urbina, A.

Publication year

2016

Journal title

AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV

Page(s)

1-5
10.1080/09540121.2016.1178704
Abstract

Understanding the nexus of aging, HIV, and substance use is key to providing appropriate services and support for their aging, HIV seropositive patients. The proportion of PLWHA aged 50 and older is growing due to a variety of factors like decreases in mortality due to highly active retroviral therapy and non-negligible HIV incidence. We describe prevalence of alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use and participation in substance use treatment and 12-step programs among 95 HIV-positive patients aged 50 and older engaged in care. Most (73.7%) smoked cigarettes in their lifetime and 46.3% were current smokers. Most were at medium (81.1%) or high risk (13.7%) for an alcohol use disorder. With respect to illicit drug use, 48.4% had used marijuana, cocaine, crack, methamphetamines, heroin, and/or prescription opiates without a prescription in the last 12 months; 23.2% met criteria for drug dependence. Marijuana was the most commonly reported illicit drug (32.6%) followed by cocaine and crack (10.5% each), heroin and prescription opiates (7.4% each), and methamphetamines (6.3%). Among those who had not used drugs in the past 12 months, 36.7% had been in a substance use treatment program and 26.5% had participated in a 12-step program in their lifetime; 8.2% were currently in treatment and 16.3% were currently participating in a 12-step program. Among those who had used an illicit drug in the past 12 months, 37.0% had never been in treatment, 34.8% had been in treatment in their lifetime, and 28.3% were currently in treatment. With respect to 12-step programs, 27.3% of those meeting dependence criteria had never participated, 45.5% had participated in their lifetimes, and 27.3% were currently participating. Our findings suggest that older adults in HIV care settings could benefit from Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment interventions and/or integrated services for substance abuse and medical treatment.

Early Life Psychosocial Stressors and Housing Instability among Young Sexual Minority Men: the P18 Cohort Study

Krause, K.D., Kapadia, F., Ompad, D., D’Avanzo, P.A., Duncan, D.T., & Halkitis, P.

Publication year

2016

Journal title

Journal of Urban Health

Page(s)

1-15
10.1007/s11524-016-0049-6
Abstract

Homelessness and housing instability is a significant public health problem among young sexual minority men. While there is a growing body of literature on correlates of homelessness among sexual minority men, there is a lack of literature parsing the different facets of housing instability. The present study examines factors associated with both living and sleeping in unstable housing among n = 600 sexual minority men (ages 18–19). Multivariate models were constructed to examine the extent to which sociodemographic, interpersonal, and behavioral factors as well as adverse childhood experiences explain housing instability. Overall, 13 % of participants reported sleeping in unstable housing and 18 % had lived in unstable housing at some point in the 6 months preceding the assessment. The odds of currently sleeping in unstable housing were greater among those who experienced more frequent lack of basic needs (food, proper hygiene, clothing) during their childhoods. More frequent experiences of childhood physical abuse and a history of arrest were associated with currently living in unstable housing. Current enrollment in school was a protective factor with both living and sleeping in unstable housing. These findings indicate that being unstably housed can be rooted in early life experiences and suggest a point of intervention that may prevent unstable housing among sexual minority men.

Human papillomavirus vaccination and cervical cytology outcomes among urban low-income minority females

Hofstetter, A.M., Ompad, D., Stockwell, M.S., Rosenthal, S.L., & Soren, K.

Publication year

2016

Journal title

JAMA Pediatrics

Volume

170

Page(s)

445-452
10.1001/jamapediatrics.2015.3926
Abstract

IMPORTANCE The quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was licensed for use in 9- through 26-year-old females in 2006. Postlicensure studies in Australia, Denmark, and Canada have demonstrated vaccine effectiveness against abnormal cervical cytology results. However, there are limited data describing postlicensure effectiveness in the United States, particularly among minority females at higher risk for HPV infection and cervical cancer. OBJECTIVE To examine the effect of HPV vaccination on abnormal cervical cytology results among minority females. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective cohort study conducted between January 2007 and January 2014 at 16 academically affiliated community clinics serving a low-income minority population. Included in this study was a population-based sample of 16 266 females aged 11 through 20 years as of January 1, 2007, who received care at a participating clinic on or after that date. EXPOSURE Human papillomavirus vaccination, stratified by the number of doses. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Cervical cytology abnormality following either HPV vaccination or, if unvaccinated, the first missed opportunity for HPV vaccination after January 1, 2007. Abnormalities were defined as atypical glandular cells, atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, atypical squamous cells, cannot exclude a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, or high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions. RESULTS There were 4127 female patients who initiated quadrivalent HPV vaccination or had their first missed HPV vaccination opportunity from 11 through 20 years of age and underwent subsequent cervical cytology screening. The patients were primarily Spanish speaking (n = 2297; 58.3%) and publicly insured (n = 3801; 92.1%). The detection rate for an abnormal cervical cytology result during the observation period was lower among vaccinated (1 dose) (79.1 per 1000 person-years) vs unvaccinated (125.7 per 1000 person-years) females. The risk for an abnormal cervical cytology result was lower among vaccinated vs unvaccinated females (hazard ratio [HR], 0.64; 95%CI, 0.57-0.73), particularly if the 3-dose series was completed (HR, 0.48; 95%CI, 0.41-0.56) or if the vaccine was administered from 11 through 14 years of age (1 dose: HR, 0.36; 95%CI, 0.16-0.79; 3 doses: HR, 0.27; 95%CI, 0.12-0.63). This protective effect remained after adjusting for demographics, clinic type, abnormal baseline cervical cytology result, and baseline Chlamydia screening (as proxy for sexual experience). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE This study demonstrated the HPV vaccine is effective in a real-world setting of high-risk patients with variable HPV vaccination patterns.

Nonmedical opioid use and heroin use in a nationally representative sample of us high school seniors

Palamar, J.J., Shearston, J.A., Dawson, E.W., Mateu-Gelabert, P., & Ompad, D.

Publication year

2016

Journal title

Drug and Alcohol Dependence

Volume

158

Page(s)

132-138
10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2015.11.005
Abstract

Background: Nonmedical use of opioids has become increasingly problematic in recent years with increases in overdoses, treatment admissions, and deaths. Use also appears to be contributing to heroin initiation, which has increased in recent years. Further research is needed to examine which adolescents are at highest risk for nonmedical use of opioids and heroin and to explore potential links between nonmedical opioid use and heroin use. Methods: Data were analyzed from a nationally representative sample of American high school seniors in the Monitoring the Future study (2009-2013, Weighted N = 67,822). We examined associations between frequency and recency of nonmedical use of opioids and heroin. Sociodemographic correlates of use of each drug were also examined. Results: 12.4% of students reported lifetime nonmedical opioid use and 1.2% reported lifetime heroin use. As frequency of lifetime nonmedical opioid use increased, so too did the odds for reporting heroin use, with over three-quarters (77.3%) of heroin users reporting lifetime nonmedical opioid use. Recent (30-day) nonmedical opioid use was a robust risk factor for heroin use and almost a quarter (23.2%) of students who reported using opioids ≥40 times reported lifetime heroin use. Black and Hispanic students were less likely to report nonmedical opioid or heroin use than white students, but they were more likely to report heroin use in absence of nonmedical opioid use. Discussion: Recent and frequent nonmedical opioid use are risk factors for heroin use among adolescents. Prevention needs to be targeted to those at highest risk.

Reliability and Validity of a Material Resources Scale and Its Association With Depression Among Young Men Who Have Sex With Men: The P18 Cohort Study

Ompad, D., Palamar, J.J., Krause, K.D., Kapadia, F., & Halkitis, P.

Publication year

2016

Journal title

American Journal of Men's Health
10.1177/1557988316651206
Abstract

Socioeconomic status (SES) is a fundamental cause of ill health, but an understudied determinant of health for gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM). Surprisingly, few studies have examined the relations between poverty and depression among young MSM. The aims of this study were to determine the reliability and validity of an 18-item Family Resource Scale (FRS) as a measure of SES among YMSM and examine the relations between SES and depression, while taking into account factors associated with resilience or risk for poor mental health. Reliability of the SES scale was determined with Cronbach's alpha. Validity was assessed with factor analysis and bivariable comparisons with other SES measures. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine the relations between depressive symptomology (via the Beck Depression Inventory-II), SES, and gay-related psychosocial variables. In this racially/ethnically diverse sample (mean age = 21.8 years, 37.3% Hispanic/Latino, 30.5% White, 14.9% Black, and 17.0% other race/ethnicity), 70.8% reported incomes ≤ $10,000 and the mean FRS score was 4.1 (SD = 0.9, range 0-5). The FRS demonstrated reliability (α = .91) and criterion and construct validity. The Beck Depression Inventory-II rated 17.6% with depressive symptomology. Higher FRS scores were associated with a lower odds of depression (adjusted odds ratio = 0.58; 95% confidence interval = 0.46-0.74) in logistic regression models controlling for gay community affinity and internalized homophobia. This diverse sample of YMSM in New York City reported substantial financial hardship and those who were more gay-identified had fewer material resources. Fewer material resources and internalized homophobia were both associated with higher odds of depression.

Self-Reported Ecstasy/MDMA/“Molly” Use in a Sample of Nightclub and Dance Festival Attendees in New York City

Palamar, J.J., Acosta, P., Ompad, D., & Cleland, C.M.

Publication year

2016

Journal title

Substance Use and Misuse

Page(s)

1-10
10.1080/10826084.2016.1219373
Abstract

Background: Ecstasy (MDMA) use has regained popularity in the United States, particularly in the form of “Molly,” which is often marketed as pure MDMA. Surveys have generally not included “Molly” in the definition of ecstasy, so rates of use may be underestimated. As popularity of ecstasy increases, research is needed to examine use among those at highest risk for use—nightlife attendees. Methods: We surveyed 679 young adults (age 18–25) entering nightclubs and festivals holding electronic dance music (EDM) parties in New York City in 2015. A variation of time-space sampling was utilized. We examined prevalence and correlates of self-reported lifetime ecstasy use. Results: Self-reported lifetime ecstasy use was common (42.8%, 95% CI: 32.8, 52.7). Use was most common among older participants, frequent party attendees, and those reporting higher levels of exposure to users. Those surveyed outside of festivals were less likely to report use compared to those surveyed outside of nightclubs (AOR = 0.37, p = .015). Over a third of ecstasy users (36.8%)reported use in pill, powder, and crystal form. Ecstasy users were also more likely to report use of other drugs, including novel psychoactive substances (e.g., 2C series drugs, synthetic cathinones [“bath salts”]). Half (50.4%) reported suspecting (21.9%) or finding out (28.5%) that their ecstasy had ever contained a drug other than MDMA. Conclusion: A large percentage of nightlife attendees in NYC report lifetime ecstasy use. Findings should inform prevention and harm reduction programming. Further research is needed as ecstasy continues to change (e.g., in form, purity, and name).

Self-reported use of novel psychoactive substances among attendees of electronic dance music venues

Palamar, J.J., Acosta, P., Sherman, S., Ompad, D., & Cleland, C.M.

Publication year

2016

Journal title

American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse

Page(s)

1-9
10.1080/00952990.2016.1181179
Abstract

Background: Novel psychoactive substances (NPSs) continue to emerge in the United States and worldwide. Few epidemiological studies have examined the prevalence and correlates of use. Objective: We examined the extent of NPS use in a high-risk population—attendees of electronic dance music (EDM) parties at nightclubs and festivals. Methods: We surveyed 682 adults (age 18–25) entering EDM events at nightclubs and festivals in New York City (NYC) in 2015. A variation of time–space sampling was used. We examined the prevalence of self-reported use of 196 NPS and correlates of any NPS use. Results: Over a third (35.1%) of participants reported lifetime use of any NPS. Self-reported use of synthetic cannabinoids was most prevalent (16.3%), followed by psychedelic phenethylamines (14.7%; 2C series: 10.3%, 2-(4-iodo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N-[(2-methoxyphenyl)methyl]ethanamine [NBOMe] series: 9.0%, Dox series: 3.5%), synthetic cathinones (“bath salts”, 6.9%), other psychedelics (6.6%), tryptamines (5.1%), and dissociatives (4.3%). 2C-I was the most prevalent 2C series drug (5.1%); methylone was the most prevalent synthetic cathinone (3.3%), 2-MeO-ketamine was the most prevalent dissociative (3.7%), and 1P-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) (2.9%) was the most prevalent non-phenethylamine psychedelic. Risk factors for NPS use included Ecstasy/MDMA/Molly, LSD, and ketamine use; identifying as bisexual (compared to heterosexual), reporting higher frequency of nightclub/festival attendance, and being surveyed outside of a festival (compared to those surveyed outside of nightclubs). Discussion: NPS use is prevalent in the nightclub and festival scenes in NYC. Since individuals in these scenes—especially frequent attendees—are at high risk for use, prevention and harm reduction services need to be geared toward this population.

Association between Pregnancy and Active Injection Drug Use and Sex Work among Women Injection Drug Users in Saint Petersburg, Russia

Girchenko, P., Ompad, D., Bikmukhametov, D., & Gensburg, L.

Publication year

2015

Journal title

Journal of Urban Health

Volume

92

Page(s)

548-558
10.1007/s11524-015-9954-3
Abstract

Widespread use of unsafe sexual practices among women injecting drugs both practicing and not practicing sex work leads to high levels of unplanned pregnancies in this population. The goal of this study was to investigate the association between pregnancy and active drug use and sex work. Data were collected using a convenience sample of 500 women in Saint Petersburg, Russia, in 2013. All women had recent experience of drug use, of which 200 were pregnant at the time of the study. The study consisted of a structured interview followed by a rapid HIV test. Pregnancy was protective against both active drug use and sex work. For HIV-positive women, these associations were stronger than for HIV-negative women: drug use prevalence ratio (PR) was 0.59 vs 0.85; for sex work, the PRs were 0.36 vs 0.64. Higher levels of education were associated with a lower prevalence ratio for active drug use and sex work in all models. Having children was not associated with active drug use or sex work. Pregnancy might be an optimal time for conducting interventions aimed at cessation of drug use and sex work among women injecting drugs.

Availability of outpatient clinical nutrition services for patients with cancer undergoing treatment at Comprehensive Cancer Centers

Platek, M.E., Johnson, J., Woolf, K., Makarem, N., & Ompad, D.

Publication year

2015

Journal title

Journal of Oncology Practice

Volume

11

Page(s)

1-5
10.1200/JOP.2013.001134
Abstract

Purpose: The mission of US Comprehensive Cancer Centers (CCC) is to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality. The type of clinical nutrition services available to outpatients seeking treatment at CCCs is unknown. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence and types of outpatient clinical nutrition services available at CCCs. Methods: A list of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) -designated CCCs was compiled. A telephone survey that queried clinical nutrition services available to outpatients undergoing treatment was developed. The survey was conducted with clinical nutrition personnel during usual working hours between April and October 2012. Results: Of the 40 CCCs, 32 (80%) completed the survey. Thirty CCCs offered referral- or consult-based services with a clinical nutrition professional such as a registered dietitian (RD). Other services included nutrition classes (56%), nutrition pamphlets (94%), and counseling by non-nutrition health care providers (81%). Twenty-three of the centers monitored patients regularly, but less than half followed a clinical nutrition protocol such as those established by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Referral-based services were provided for cancers with a high prevalence of malnutrition, such as head and neck and GI, with most monitoring patients regularly but less than half using evidence-based protocols. Conclusion: CCCs rely on referral-based clinical nutrition service, which are not consistently a part of multidisciplinary care. An in-depth comparison of clinical nutrition services among other approaches to cancer care, including a comparison of clinical outcomes among these different approaches, is needed.

Complexity and Dynamism from an Urban Health Perspective: a Rationale for a System Dynamics Approach

Tozan, Y., & Ompad, D.

Publication year

2015

Journal title

Journal of Urban Health

Volume

92

Page(s)

490-501
10.1007/s11524-015-9963-2
Abstract

In a variety of urban health frameworks, cities are conceptualized as complex and dynamic yet commonly used epidemiological methods have failed to address this complexity and dynamism head on due to their narrow problem definitions and linear analytical representations. Scholars from a variety of disciplines have also long conceptualized cities as systems, but few have modeled urban health issues as problems within a system. Systems thinking in general and system dynamics in particular are relatively new approaches in public health, but ones that hold immense promise as methodologies to model and analyze the complexity underlying urban processes to effectively inform policy actions in dynamic environments. This conceptual essay reviews the utility of applying the concepts, principles, and methods of systems thinking to the study of complex urban health phenomena as a complementary approach to standard epidemiological methods using specific examples and provides recommendations on how to better incorporate systems thinking methods in urban health research and practice.

Correlates of Lifetime History of Purchasing Sex Services by Men in Saint Petersburg and Leningrad Oblast, Russia

Girchenko, P., Ompad, D., Kulchynska, R., Bikmukhametov, D., Dugin, S., & Gensburg, L.

Publication year

2015

Journal title

Journal of Urban Health

Volume

92

Page(s)

1105-1116
10.1007/s11524-015-9990-z
Abstract

Commercial sex workers (CSWs) in the Russian Federation are at high risk of HIV infection and transmission as a result of unsafe sexual and injecting behaviors. Their clients might be at increased risk of acquiring HIV; however, little is known about the population of men purchasing sex services. This study aims to investigate factors associated with a history of purchasing sex services by men in Saint Petersburg and Leningrad Oblast, Russian Federation. Data were collected as part of a cross-sectional study offering free anonymous rapid HIV testing in Saint Petersburg and Leningrad Oblast in 2014; in total, 3565 men aged 18 years and older provided information about their behaviors associated with risk of acquiring HIV during face-to-face interviews. Prevalence of CSW use in our study was 23.9 %. Multivariable analyses using log-binomial regression were stratified by self-reported HIV testing during the 12 months preceding the study interview. In both strata, older age, multiple sex partners, and a history of sex with an injection drug user (IDU) were associated with an elevated prevalence ratio (PR) for history of purchasing sex services, although the strength of the association differed by strata. Among men who reported recent HIV testing, condom use (PR = 1.22, 90 % confidence interval (CI) 1.0, 1.48) was associated with a history of purchasing sex services, and among men who did not report recent HIV testing, having a consistent sex partner was associated with purchasing sex services (PR = 1.23, 90 % CI 1.1, 1.37). The high prevalence of CSW service use and associations found in this study raise serious concerns about potential for sexual HIV transmission and should be investigated more closely.

Illicit drug use among rave attendees in a nationally representative sample of US high school seniors

Palamar, J.J., Griffin-Tomas, M., & Ompad, D.

Publication year

2015

Journal title

Drug and Alcohol Dependence

Volume

152

Page(s)

24-31
10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2015.05.002
Abstract

Background: The popularity of electronic dance music and rave parties such as dance festivals has increased in recent years. Targeted samples of party-goers suggest high rates of drug use among attendees, but few nationally representative studies have examined these associations. Methods: We examined sociodemographic correlates of rave attendance and relationships between rave attendance and recent (12-month) use of various drugs in a representative sample of US high school seniors (modal age: 18) from the Monitoring the Future study (2011-2013; Weighted N=7373). Results: One out of five students (19.8%) reported ever attending a rave, and 7.7% reported attending at least monthly. Females and highly religious students were less likely to attend raves, and Hispanics, students residing in cities, students with higher income and those who go out for fun multiple times per week were more likely to attend. Rave attendees were more likely than non-attendees to report use of an illicit drug other than marijuana (35.5% vs. 15.6%, p

Incidence of HIV Infection in Young Gay, Bisexual, and Other YMSM: The P18 Cohort Study

Halkitis, P., Kapadia, F., & Ompad, D.

Publication year

2015

Journal title

Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes

Volume

69

Page(s)

466-473
10.1097/QAI.0000000000000616
Abstract

CONTENT: HIV infections continue to rise in a new generation of young gay, bisexual, and other young men who have sex with men (YMSM) despite 3 decades of HIV prevention and recent biomedical technologies to deter infection.

OBJECTIVES: To examine the incidence of HIV and the demographic, behavioral, and structural factors associated with incident infections.

DESIGN: A prospective cohort study.

PARTICIPANTS: Six hundred YMSM who were aged 18-19 years at baseline.

RESULTS: At baseline, 6 prevalent cases of HIV were detected. Over the course of 36 months and 6 additional waves of data collection, we identified 43 (7.2%) incident cases of HIV. Incident infections were marginally higher among those residing in neighborhoods with higher rates of HIV prevalence. Using Cox proportional hazards models, we detected that hazard ratios (HRs) for time to HIV seroconversion were significantly higher for black YMSM (HR = 7.46) and mixed/other race YMSM (HR = 7.99), and older age at sexual debut with another man was associated with a lower risk of HIV seroconversion (HR = 0.50), whereas low perceived familial socioeconomic status was marginally associated with an increased risk for HIV seroconversion (HR = 2.45).

CONCLUSIONS: These findings support the disparities for HIV that exist within the population of sexual minority men and suggest that we attend to behavioral, structural, and social conditions to effectively tailor HIV prevention for a new generation of YMSM with keen eyes to the conditions faced by racial and ethnic minority YMSM, which heightened their risk for acquiring HIV.

Moving Toward a Holistic Conceptual Framework for Understanding Healthy Aging Among Gay Men

Halkitis, P., Kapadia, F., Ompad, D., & Perez-Figueroa, R.

Publication year

2015

Journal title

Journal of Homosexuality

Volume

62

Page(s)

571-587
10.1080/00918369.2014.987567
Abstract

In the last four decades, we have witnessed vast and important transitions in the social, economic, political, and health contexts of the lived experiences of gay men in the United States. This dynamic period, as evidenced most prominently by the transition of the gay rights movement to a civil rights movement, has shifted the exploration of gay men’s health from one focusing primarily on HIV/AIDS into a mainstream consideration of the overall health and wellbeing of gay men. Against this backdrop, aging gay men in the United States constitute a growing population, for whom further investigations of health states and health-related disparities are warranted. In order to advance our understanding of the health and wellbeing of aging gay men, we outline here a multilevel, ecosocial conceptual framework that integrates salient environmental, social, psychosocial, and sociodeomgraphic factors into sets of macro-, meso-, and micro-level constructs that can be applied to comprehensively study health states and health care utilization in older gay men.

Contact

dco2@nyu.edu +1 (212) 992-6142 715/719 Broadway New York, NY 10003