Claudia Maria Passos Ferreira

Claudia Passos-Ferreira
Claudia Maria Passos Ferreira

Assistant Professor of Bioethics

Professional overview

Claudia Passos-Ferreira is Assistant Professor of Bioethics. She studied psychology at the Rio de Janeiro State University and earned her MA and Ph.D. in the program of Human Sciences and Health Sciences in Public Health there.  She obtained a second Ph.D. in Philosophy at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro in Brazil.

Passos-Ferreira has published on philosophy, psychology, and neuroethics.  She has collaborated in crosscultural research on moral development and social cognition (on topics such as empathy, fairness, ownership, intersubjectivity). She has published a book on Freud and mental causation. In philosophy of mind, she has published on self-knowledge, introspection, and external mental content.  Passos-Ferreira’s current research program focuses on the development of consciousness, including what theories of consciousness say about infant consciousness and machine consciousness, and how these theories shed light on ethical issues. 

Prior to joining NYU, Passos-Ferreira was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro with the Ethics and Biotechnologies project., and a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the State University of Rio de Janeiro with the Ecological Mind and Self-Consciousness project.  Earlier in her career, she was awarded a Residency Scholarship from the Brazilian Health Ministry and she received clinical training in Child-Adolescent Mental Health and Mental Health. She has worked as clinical psychologist in private practice and public hospitals as well in Brazil. 

Education

BA, Psychology, Rio de Janeiro State University, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
MA and PhD, Human Sciences and Health Sciences in Public Health, Rio de Janeiro State University, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
PhD, Philosophy, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Publications

Publications

Freud's views on mental causation

Passos-Ferreira, C. (n.d.). In Psychoanalysis and the Mind-Body Problem.

Publication year

2022

Page(s)

69-87

Editorial introduction symposium on pain amnesia and qualitative memory

Passos-Ferreira, C. (n.d.).

Publication year

2020

Journal title

Journal of Consciousness Studies

Volume

27

Issue

11

Page(s)

99-101

In Defense of Empathy: a response to Prinz

Passos Ferreira, C. (n.d.).

Publication year

2015

Journal title

Abstracta: Linguagem, Mente e Ação
Abstract
Abstract
A prevailing view in moral psychology holds that empathy and sympathy play key roles in morality and in prosocial and altruistic actions. Recently, Jesse Prinz (2011a, 2011b) has challenged this view and has argued that empathy does not play a foundational or causal role in morality. He suggests that in fact the presence of empathetic emotions is harmful to morality. Prinz rejects all theories that connect empathy and morality as a constitutional, epistemological, developmental, motivational, or normative necessity. I consider two of Prinz’s theses: the thesis that empathy is not necessary for moral development, and the thesis that empathy should be avoided as a guide for morality. Based on recent research in moral psychology, I argue that empathy plays a crucial role in development of moral agency. I also argue that empathy is desirable as a moral emotion.

O self como centro de ação em James e Winnicott

Passos-Ferreira, C. (n.d.).

Publication year

2014

Journal title

Agora

Volume

17

Issue

1

Page(s)

27-42
Abstract
Abstract
Our goal is to investigate the notion of self-agency in James and Winnicott. With James, we examine the descriptive element of what constitutes a self. With Winnicott, we explore his explanatory theory on self-emergence. Winnicott's perspective is presented here as the prehistory of the Jamesian self. James's conception of self is similar to the Winnicottian integrated self that is an embodied position that emerges from the organism's actions at the experiential field. The blend of the two approaches leads to the idea that the self is a flux of identities emerging in interaction with others in the transitional space.

Ownership reasoning in children across cultures

Seria a moralidade determinada pelo cérebro? Neurônios-espelhos, empatia e neuromoralidade

Passos-Ferreira, C. (n.d.).

Publication year

2011

Journal title

Physis

Volume

21

Issue

2

Page(s)

471-490
Abstract
Abstract
This paper aims to consider the impact of progress in the neurosciences, in particular the discovery of mirror neurons, on the study of morality. It analyzes the current attempts at naturalizing moral principles based on this discovery, reducing human morality to basic biological properties. It explores how psychological studies on empathy, perspective taking and embodied simulation have gained new credibility, explanatory power, and overall theoretical "traction" because of the discovery of mirror neuron systems. As part of this movement, there are now renewed attempts by researchers at establishing functional links, possibly causal links, between brain and moral thought. These attempts and the renewed quest toward naturalizing ethics are critically considered.

A ritalina no Brasil: Produções, discursose práticas

Ortega, F., Barros, D., Caliman, L., Itaborahy, C., Junqueira, L., & Ferreira, C. P. (n.d.).

Publication year

2010

Journal title

Interface: Communication, Health, Education

Volume

14

Issue

34

Page(s)

499-510
Abstract
Abstract
The aim of this paper was to present ongoing research on the social representations relating to ritalin in Brazil between 1998 and 2008. Over this period, there was a considerable increase in ritalin usage and expansion of its use to purposes other than therapeutic use. Ritalin has been used not only for treating attention disorders, but also to enhance cognitive functions in healthy individuals. The research has developed through two fields of investigation with different methodologies. In the first field, Brazilian scientific and popular publications have been investigated, with analysis on the arguments justifying ritalin usage and how scientific results are disseminated to the lay public in large-circulation newspapers. In the second field, focus groups have been used to explore the social representations that university students, students' parents and healthcare professionals have in relation to the use of ritalin for enhancing cognitive performance.

Fairness in distributive justice by 3- and 5-year-olds across seven cultures

Rochat, P., Dias, M. D., Liping, G., Broesch, T., Passos-Ferreira, C., Winning, A., & Berg, B. (n.d.).

Publication year

2009

Journal title

Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology

Volume

40

Issue

3

Page(s)

416-442
Abstract
Abstract
This research investigates 3- and 5-year-olds' relative fairness in distributing small collections of even or odd numbers of more or less desirable candies, either with an adult experimenter or between two dolls. The authors compare more than 200 children from around the world, growing up in seven highly contrasted cultural and economic contexts, from rich and poor urban areas, to small-scale traditional and rural communities. Across cultures, young children tend to optimize their own gain, not showing many signs of self-sacrifice or generosity. Already by 3 years of age, self-optimizing in distributive justice is based on perspective taking and rudiments of mind reading. By 5 years, overall, children tend to show more fairness in sharing. What varies across cultures is the magnitude of young children's self-interest. More fairness (less self-interest) in distributive justice is evident by children growing up in small-scale urban and traditional societies thought to promote more collective values.

Homo negotiatus

Rochat, P., & Ferreira, C. P. (n.d.). In Origins of the Social Mind: Ontogeny of the unique ways humans own, share and reciprocate.

Publication year

2008

Page(s)

141-156
Abstract
Abstract
Social animals need to share space and resources, whether sexual partners, parents, or food. Sharing is indeed at the core of social life. Humans, however, of all social animals, have distinct ways of sharing. They evolved to become Homo Negotiatus; a species that is prone to bargain and to dispute the value of things until some agreement is reached.

Contact

cpf264@nyu.edu 708 Broadway 6FL New York, NY, 10003