Claudia Maria Passos Ferreira

Claudia Passos-Ferreira
Claudia Maria Passos Ferreira

Assistant Professor of Bioethics

Professional overview

Claudia Passos-Ferreira is Assistant Professor of Bioethics. She studied psychology at the Rio de Janeiro State University and earned her MA and Ph.D. in the program of Human Sciences and Health Sciences in Public Health there.  She obtained a second Ph.D. in Philosophy at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro in Brazil.

Passos-Ferreira has published on philosophy, psychology, and neuroethics.  She has collaborated in crosscultural research on moral development and social cognition (on topics such as empathy, fairness, ownership, intersubjectivity). She has published a book on Freud and mental causation. In philosophy of mind, she has published on self-knowledge, introspection, and external mental content.  Passos-Ferreira’s current research program focuses on the development of consciousness, including what theories of consciousness say about infant consciousness and machine consciousness, and how these theories shed light on ethical issues. 

Prior to joining NYU, Passos-Ferreira was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro with the Ethics and Biotechnologies project., and a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the State University of Rio de Janeiro with the Ecological Mind and Self-Consciousness project.  Earlier in her career, she was awarded a Residency Scholarship from the Brazilian Health Ministry and she received clinical training in Child-Adolescent Mental Health and Mental Health. She has worked as clinical psychologist in private practice and public hospitals as well in Brazil. 

Education

BA, Psychology, Rio de Janeiro State University, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
MA and PhD, Human Sciences and Health Sciences in Public Health, Rio de Janeiro State University, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
PhD, Philosophy, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Publications

Publications

Editorial introduction symposium on pain amnesia and qualitative memory

Passos-Ferreira, C.

Publication year

2020

Journal title

Journal of Consciousness Studies

Volume

27

Issue

11

Page(s)

99-101

O self como centro de ação em James e Winnicott

Ownership reasoning in children across cultures

Rochat, P., Robbins, E., Passos-Ferreira, C., Donato Oliva, A., Dias, M. D., & Guo, L.

Publication year

2014

Journal title

Cognition

Volume

132

Issue

3

Page(s)

471-484
Abstract
Abstract
To what extent do early intuitions about ownership depend on cultural and socio-economic circumstances? We investigated the question by testing reasoning about third party ownership conflicts in various groups of three- and five-year-old children (N= 176), growing up in seven highly contrasted social, economic, and cultural circumstances (urban rich, poor, very poor, rural poor, and traditional) spanning three continents. Each child was presented with a series of scripts involving two identical dolls fighting over an object of possession. The child had to decide who of the two dolls should own the object. Each script enacted various potential reasons for attributing ownership: creation, familiarity, first contact, equity, plus a control/neutral condition with no suggested reasons. Results show that across cultures, children are significantly more consistent and decisive in attributing ownership when one of the protagonists created the object. Development between three and five years is more or less pronounced depending on culture. The propensity to split the object in equal halves whenever possible was generally higher at certain locations (i.e., China) and quasi-inexistent in others (i.e., Vanuatu and street children of Recife). Overall, creation reasons appear to be more primordial and stable across cultures than familiarity, relative wealth or first contact. This trend does not correlate with the passing of false belief theory of mind.

Seria a moralidade determinada pelo cérebro? Neurônios-espelhos, empatia e neuromoralidade

A ritalina no Brasil: Produções, discursose práticas

Fairness in distributive justice by 3- and 5-year-olds across seven cultures

Rochat, P., Dias, M. D., Liping, G., Broesch, T., Passos-Ferreira, C., Winning, A., & Berg, B.

Publication year

2009

Journal title

Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology

Volume

40

Issue

3

Page(s)

416-442
Abstract
Abstract
This research investigates 3- and 5-year-olds' relative fairness in distributing small collections of even or odd numbers of more or less desirable candies, either with an adult experimenter or between two dolls. The authors compare more than 200 children from around the world, growing up in seven highly contrasted cultural and economic contexts, from rich and poor urban areas, to small-scale traditional and rural communities. Across cultures, young children tend to optimize their own gain, not showing many signs of self-sacrifice or generosity. Already by 3 years of age, self-optimizing in distributive justice is based on perspective taking and rudiments of mind reading. By 5 years, overall, children tend to show more fairness in sharing. What varies across cultures is the magnitude of young children's self-interest. More fairness (less self-interest) in distributive justice is evident by children growing up in small-scale urban and traditional societies thought to promote more collective values.

Homo negotiatus

Contact

cpf264@nyu.edu 708 Broadway 6FL New York, NY, 10003