Jennifer Cantrell

Jennifer Cantrell
Jennifer Cantrell

Assistant Professor of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Professional overview

Jennifer Cantrell, DrPH, MPA is Assistant Professor in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences. She earned her DrPH from Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and her MPA from Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs. She completed postdoctoral training in the National Institute of Drug Abuse’s (NIDA) program for Behavioral Science Training in Drug Abuse Research at National Development Research Institutes in New York, NY.

Dr. Cantrell’s research focuses on the impact of policies and population-level interventions, including communications, media and messaging, on health risk behaviors for tobacco use and opioid use. With a primary focus on tobacco use, Dr. Cantrell’s research examines the ways that pro- and anti-tobacco marketing, digital media, tobacco regulatory policies, and community processes shape youth tobacco prevention, adult cessation and tobacco-related disparities. She also conducts research on the development of novel cessation interventions for groups that experience disparities in smoking. Dr. Cantrell has published over 50 scientific articles, co-authored a chapter on “Communication, Marketing and Tobacco-related Disparities” in the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Monograph 22: A Socioecological Approach to Tobacco-related Disparities, and received national and international media coverage for her work. Her research has been funded by NIDA, the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD), Truth Initiative, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and NYU’s Vice Provostial Mega-Grants Initiative.

Prior to joining NYU GPH, she was a Managing Director and Research Investigator at Truth Initiative, a national non-profit research and education organization focused on tobacco use prevention and cessation, where she evaluated and conducted research on national anti-smoking mass media efforts, including the award-winning truth® campaign and the Centers for Disease Control’s Tips for Former Smokers campaign. As part of this work, she led the development of the winning proposal for the 2017 Berreth Award for Excellence in Public Health Communication. She has received the NIH Loan Repayment Program award for health disparities research from NIMHD and serves on multiple advisory committees.

 

Areas of research and study

Alcohol, Tobacco and Driving Policies
Behavioral Science
Health Disparities
Population Health
Public Health Policy
Social Behaviors
Social epidemiology

Publications

Publications

Assessing digital advertising exposure using a virtual experimental protocol

Cantrell, J., Bingenheimer, J., Tulsiani, S., Hair, E., Vallone, D., Mills, S., Gerard, R., & Evans, W. D. (n.d.).

Publication year

2022

Journal title

Digital Health

Volume

8
Abstract
Abstract
Introduction: The rapid increase in online public education campaigns underscores the need for a better understanding of the effects of exposure to digital advertising and targeted individual-level outcomes. The goal of this study is to develop a virtual experimental protocol to evaluate the dose-response effects of individual-level exposure to digital video ads on campaign outcomes in a naturalistic online browsing context. Methods: Young adults aged 18–24 years (n = 221) completed three 5 min viewing sessions on a realistic mock-up of the YouTube mobile app over a period of 2 weeks, followed by a 10-min survey after the third session. Participants were randomized to view between 0 and 6 exposures of ads from an e-cigarette prevention campaign; respondents viewed a total of 2 ads per session, with 0 to 2 of those ads being non-skippable digital video ads from the campaign and/or a dummy ad. The video ads played prior to short YouTube videos. Outcomes measured were self-reported ad recognition, frequency of ad exposure, and main message knowledge. Results: This study demonstrates a rapidly accessible virtual experimental protocol for evaluating the dose-response effects of digital advertising and individual-level outcomes. Five digital exposures of non-skippable video ads delivered via this platform over a 2-week period generated the highest ad recognition when there were up to six exposures. Higher exposure levels may be needed for message knowledge and ad-content-related effects. Conclusion: This protocol can be extended to investigate dose-response effects and mechanisms of action of individual-level exposure to digital advertising for multiple campaign outcomes, including changes in knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs. Findings can inform evidence for adequate levels of digital exposure in public education campaigns.

Cigar Use Progression Among New Cigar Initiators: A Two-Part Growth Curve Analysis Among a Youth and Young Adult Cohort

Cantrell, J., Xu, S., Kreslake, J., Liu, M., & Hair, E. (n.d.).

Publication year

2022

Journal title

Nicotine and Tobacco Research

Volume

24

Issue

1

Page(s)

28-36
Abstract
Abstract
Introduction: Youth and young adults (YYAs) are at high risk of cigar use. This study's objective was to examine progression and sociodemographic differences in current cigar use and frequency among new cigar initiators. Aims and Methods: We conducted a two-part latent growth model among a nationally representative cohort of cigar initiators (aged 15-25) to examine 24-month trajectories of current cigar use and frequency (n = 1483). The cohort was recruited via address-based sampling with online data collection from 2014 to 2019 and surveyed approximately every 6 months. Results: The unconditional odds of current cigar use (ie, past 30-day use) within 6 months of initiation was 0.72 (95% confidence interval: 0.63, 0.82), corresponding to a probability of 42%. The odds of current use among recent cigar initiates declined 6 months after initiation and was followed by a stabilization in use over time. Among continued users, frequency (# days used in past 30 days) increased linearly over time but remained low (3.47 days/months at 24 months). Younger individuals, non-Hispanic African Americans, those with lower subjective financial status, and current users of cigarettes, other tobacco products and/or marijuana were at highest risk within 6 months of initiation. Males, younger users, and current cigarette smokers had the highest risk for cigar progression over time. Conclusions: This study is the first to examine longitudinal cigar use patterns among YYA cigar initiators. Findings emphasize the need for research across the cigar use spectrum and the importance of interventions targeted by age, stage of use, cigarette, other tobacco, and marijuana use and key sociodemographics to interrupt use pathways. Implications: This study is the first to examine progression of cigar use among YYAs who have newly initiated cigars. Results show a high probability of current cigar use within 6 months of initiation followed by a rapid decline and stabilization over time. Frequency increases among those who continue using cigars. Males, younger users, and current cigarette smokers had the highest risk for cigar progression over time. Findings emphasize the need for targeting interventions by age, stage of use, cigarette, other tobacco, and marijuana use and key sociodemographics to interrupt use pathways.

The Measurement of Dose and Response for Smoking Behavior Change Interventions in the Digital Age: Systematic Review

Ichimiya, M., Gerard, R., Mills, S., Brodsky, A., Cantrell, J., & Evans, W. D. (n.d.).

Publication year

2022

Journal title

Journal of medical Internet research

Volume

24

Issue

8
Abstract
Abstract
Background: There is little consensus regarding effective digital health interventions for diverse populations, which is due in part to the difficulty of quantifying the impact of various media and content and the lack of consensus on evaluating dosage and outcomes. In particular, digital smoking behavior change intervention is an area where consistency of measurement has been a challenge because of emerging products and rapid policy changes. This study reviewed the contents and outcomes of digital smoking interventions and the consistency of reporting to inform future research. Objective: This study aims to systematically review digital smoking behavior change interventions and evaluate the consistency in measuring and reporting intervention contents, channels, and dose and response outcomes. Methods: PubMed, Embase, Scopus, PsycINFO, and PAIS databases were used to search the literature between January and May 2021. General and journal-based searches were combined. All records were imported into Covidence systematic review software (Veritas Health Innovation) and duplicates were removed. Titles and abstracts were screened by 4 trained reviewers to identify eligible full-text literature. The data synthesis scheme was designed based on the concept that exposure to digital interventions can be divided into intended doses that were planned by the intervention and enacted doses that were completed by participants. The intended dose comprised the frequency and length of the interventions, and the enacted dose was assessed as the engagement. Response measures were assessed for behaviors, intentions, and psychosocial outcomes. Measurements of the dose-response relationship were reviewed for all studies. Results: A total of 2916 articles were identified through a database search. Of these 2916 articles, the title and abstract review yielded 324 (11.11%) articles for possible eligibility, and 19 (0.65%) articles on digital smoking behavior change interventions were ultimately included for data extraction and synthesis. The analysis revealed a lack of prevention studies (0/19, 0%) and dose-response studies (3/19, 16%). Of the 19 studies, 6 (32%) reported multiple behavioral measures, and 5 (23%) reported multiple psychosocial measures as outcomes. For dosage measures, 37% (7/19) of studies used frequency of exposure, and 21% (4/19) of studies mentioned the length of exposure. The assessment of clarity of reporting revealed that the duration of intervention and data collection tended to be reported vaguely in the literature. Conclusions: This review revealed a lack of studies assessing the effects of digital media interventions on smoking outcomes. Data synthesis showed that measurement and reporting were inconsistent across studies, illustrating current challenges in this field. Although most studies focused on reporting outcomes, the measurement of exposure, including intended and enacted doses, was unclear in a large proportion of studies. Clear and consistent reporting of both outcomes and exposures is needed to develop further evidence in intervention research on digital smoking behavior change.

Assessing the Health and Economic Impact of a Potential Menthol Cigarette Ban in New York City: a Modeling Study

Li, Y., Sisti, J., Flórez, K. R., Albrecht, S. S., Viswanath, A., Davila, M., Cantrell, J., Brahmbhatt, D., Thompson, A. B., Jasek, J., & Chambers, E. C. (n.d.).

Publication year

2021

Journal title

Journal of Urban Health

Volume

98

Issue

6

Page(s)

742-751
Abstract
Abstract
Menthol in cigarettes increases nicotine dependence and decreases the chances of successful smoking cessation. In New York City (NYC), nearly half of current smokers usually smoke menthol cigarettes. Female and non-Latino Black individuals were more likely to smoke menthol-flavored cigarettes compared to males and other races and ethnicities. Although the US Food and Drug Administration recently announced that it will ban menthol cigarettes, it is unclear how the policy would affect population health and health disparities in NYC. To inform potential policymaking, we used a microsimulation model of cardiovascular disease (CVD) to project the long-term health and economic impact of a potential menthol ban in NYC. Our model projected that there could be 57,232 (95% CI: 51,967–62,497) myocardial infarction (MI) cases and 52,195 (95% CI: 47,446–56,945) stroke cases per 1 million adult smokers in NYC over a 20-year period without the menthol ban policy. With the menthol ban policy, 2,862 MI cases and 1,983 stroke cases per 1 million adults could be averted over a 20-year period. The model also projected that an average of $1,836 in healthcare costs per person, or $1.62 billion among all adult smokers, could be saved over a 20-year period due to the implementation of a menthol ban policy. Results from subgroup analyses showed that women, particularly Black women, would have more reductions in adverse CVD outcomes from the potential implementation of the menthol ban policy compared to males and other racial and ethnic subgroups, which implies that the policy could reduce sex and racial and ethnic CVD disparities. Findings from our study provide policymakers with evidence to support policies that limit access to menthol cigarettes and potentially address racial and ethnic disparities in smoking-related disease burden.

E-cigarettes and Cessation: Asking Different Questions Requires Different Methods

Glasser, A., Giovenco, D. P., Levy, D. T., Vojjala, M., Cantrell, J., Abrams, D., & Niaura, R. (n.d.). In Nicotine and Tobacco Research.

Publication year

2021

Volume

23

Issue

5

Page(s)

878-879

History and Current Trends in the Electronic Cigarette Retail Marketplace in the United States: 2010-2016

Cantrell, J., Huang, J., Greenberg, M., Willett, J., Hair, E., & Vallone, D. (n.d.).

Publication year

2021

Journal title

Nicotine and Tobacco Research

Volume

22

Issue

5

Page(s)

843-847
Abstract
Abstract
Introduction: The US market for electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) has grown rapidly in the last decade. There is limited published evidence examining changes in the ENDS marketplace prior to the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) deeming rule in 2016. This study describes US ENDS retail market trends from 2010 to 2016. Methods: National data were obtained from Nielsen retail scanners for five product types: (1) disposables, (2) rechargeables, (3) cartridge replacements, (4) e-liquid bottle refills, and (5) specialty vapor products. We examined dollar sales, volume, price, brand, and flavor. Results: Adjusted national sales increased from $11.6 million in 2010 to $751.2 million in 2016. The annual rate of sales growth rapidly increased before slowing through 2015. The rate of growth spiked in 2016. Market share for menthol products and other assorted flavors increased from 20% in 2010 to 52.1% by 2016. NJOY's early market dominance shifted as tobacco industry brands entered the market and eventually captured 87.8% of share by 2016. Rechargeables and accompanying products comprised an increased proportion of total volume sold over time while disposable volume declined. Specialty vapor products appeared at retail in 2015. Conclusions: Findings show strong early growth in the ENDS retail market followed by considerable slowing over time, despite a slight uptick in 2016. Trends reflect shifts to flavored products, newer generation "open-system"devices, lower prices, and tobacco industry brands. This study provides a baseline against which to compare the impact of FDA's 2016 deeming rule and future actions on the ENDS marketplace. Implications: This study uses market scanner data from US retail outlets to describe trends in the ENDS retail market from 2010 to 2016, providing a baseline against which to compare the impact of FDA's 2016 deeming rule and future actions on the ENDS marketplace. Understanding historical market trends is valuable in assessing how future regulatory efforts and advances in ENDS technology may impact industry response and consumer uptake and use.

Patterns of E-cigarette use and subsequent cigarette smoking cessation over 2 Years (2013/2014-2015/2016) in the population assessment of tobacco and health study

Glasser, A. M., Vojjala, M., Cantrell, J., Levy, D. T., Giovenco, D. P., Abrams, D., & Niaura, R. (n.d.).

Publication year

2021

Journal title

Nicotine and Tobacco Research

Volume

23

Issue

4

Page(s)

669-677
Abstract
Abstract
Introduction: Understanding the population impact of e-cigarettes requires determining their effect on cigarette smoking cessation. Methods: Using the US Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health cohort, we examined smoking cessation among adult current cigarette smokers at Wave 1 with follow-up data at Waves 2 and 3 (n = 9724). Results: By Wave 3 (2015/2016), 17.3% of smokers had quit smoking. Smokers using e-cigarettes daily or who increased to daily use over the three waves were two to four times more likely to have quit in the short term (<1 year) and long term (1+ years) compared with never e-cigarette users (p <. 001). E-cigarette use in the last quit attempt was associated with a higher likelihood of short-term (<1 year) quitting at Wave 3 (adjusted relative risk ratio: 1.33; 95% confidence interval: 1.04, 1.71) compared with smokers who did not use an e-cigarette in their last quit attempt. Noncurrent (no use in any wave) e-cigarette users and users who were unstable in use frequency were 33% and 47% less likely to quit in the short-term, respectively (p <. 001). Flavored (vs nonflavored) and using a rechargeable (vs disposable) e-cigarette device was associated with an increased likelihood of both short- and long-term quitting. Conclusion: Smoking cessation was more likely among frequent e-cigarette users, users of e-cigarettes in last quit attempt, and users of flavored and rechargeable devices. Less frequent, unstable, past, or never e-cigarette users were less likely to quit smoking. Monitoring the relationship between patterns of e-cigarette and cigarette use is complex but critical for gauging the potential of e-cigarettes as a harm reduction tool. Implications: This study suggests that consistent and frequent e-cigarette use over time is associated with cigarette smoking cessation among adults in the United States. In addition, findings suggest that flavored e-cigarette use and use of rechargeable e-cigarette devices can facilitate smoking cessation. These results underscore the importance of carefully defining and characterizing e-cigarette exposure patterns, potential confounders, and use of e-cigarettes to quit smoking, as well as variations in length of the smoking cessation.

Impact of e-cigarette and cigarette prices on youth and young adult e-cigarette and cigarette behaviour: Evidence from a national longitudinal cohort

Sociodemographic disparities in the tobacco retail environment in Washington, DC: A spatial perspective

Anesetti-Rotherme, A., Herman, P., Bennett, M., English, N., Cantrell, J., Schillo, B., Hair, E. C., & Vallone, D. M. (n.d.).

Publication year

2020

Journal title

Ethnicity and Disease

Volume

30

Issue

3

Page(s)

479-488
Abstract
Abstract
Objective: Studies assessing sociodemographic disparities in the tobacco retail environment have relied heavily on non-spatial analytical techniques, resulting in potentially misleading conclusions. We utilized a spatial analytical framework to evaluate neighborhood sociodemographic disparities in the tobacco retail environment in Washington, DC (DC) and the DC metropolitan statistical area (DC MSA). Methods: Retail tobacco availability for DC (n=177) and DC MSA (n=1,428) census tract was assessed using adaptive-bandwidth kernel density estimation. Density surfaces were constructed from DC (n=743) and DC MSA (n=4,539) geocoded tobacco retailers. Sociodemographics were obtained from the 2011-2015 American Community Survey. Spearman's correlations between sociodemographics and retail density were computed to account for spatial autocorrelation. Bivariate and multivariate spatial lag models were fit to predict retail density. Results: DC and DC MSA neighborhoods with a higher percentage of Hispanics were positively correlated with retail density (rho = .3392, P = .0001 and rho = .1191, P = .0000, respectively). DC neighborhoods with a higher percentage of African Americans were negatively correlated with retail density (rho = -.3774, P = .0000). This pattern was not significant in DC MSA neighborhoods. Bivariate and multivariate spatial lag models found a significant inverse relationship between the percentage of African Americans and retail density (Beta = -.0133, P = .0181 and Beta = -.0165, P = .0307, respectively). Conclusions: Associations between neighborhood sociodemographics and retail density were significant, although findings regarding African Americans are inconsistent with previous findings. Future studies should analyze other geographic areas, and account for spatial autocorrelation within their analytic framework.

The Effectiveness of Online Messages for Promoting Smoking Cessation Resources: Predicting Nationwide Campaign Effects From Neural Responses in the EX Campaign

Schmälzle, R., Cooper, N., O’Donnell, M. B., Tompson, S., Lee, S., Cantrell, J., Vettel, J. M., & Falk, E. B. (n.d.).

Publication year

2020

Journal title

Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

Volume

14
Abstract
Abstract
What are the key ingredients that make some persuasive messages resonate with audiences and elicit action, while others fail? Billions of dollars per year are put towards changing human behavior, but it is difficult to know which messages will be the most persuasive in the field. By combining novel neuroimaging techniques and large-scale online data, we examine the role of key health communication variables relevant to motivating action at scale. We exposed a sample of smokers to anti-smoking web-banner messages from a real-world campaign while measuring message-evoked brain response patterns via fMRI, and we also obtained subjective evaluations of each banner. Neural indices were derived based on: (i) message-evoked activity in specific brain regions; and (ii) spatially distributed response patterns, both selected based on prior research and theoretical considerations. Next, we connected the neural and subjective data with an independent, objective outcome of message success, which is the per-banner click-through rate in the real-world campaign. Results show that messages evoking brain responses more similar to signatures of negative emotion and vividness had lower online click-through-rates. This strategy helps to connect and integrate the rapidly growing body of knowledge about brain function with formative research and outcome evaluation of health campaigns, and could ultimately further disease prevention efforts.

Examining differences in cigarette smoking prevalence among young adults across national surveillance surveys

Patterns of E-Cigarette Use among Youth and Young Adults: Review of the Impact of E-Cigarettes on Cigarette Smoking

Glasser, A., Abudayyeh, H., Cantrell, J., & Niaura, R. (n.d.).

Publication year

2019

Journal title

Nicotine and Tobacco Research

Volume

21

Issue

10

Page(s)

1320-1330
Abstract
Abstract
There is concern that e-cigarette use among youth and young adults (YAs) may lead to future cigarette or other combustible tobacco product use. A synthesis of the literature on this topic is needed because existing longitudinal studies are limited in number and not consistent in their conclusions. We conducted a search in PubMed through December 31, 2017 for peer-reviewed studies related to e-cigarette patterns of use. Of 588 relevant studies, 26 had a youth or YA sample, were longitudinal in design, and assessed e-cigarette use at baseline and cigarette smoking at follow-up. Most studies followed a sample over time and compared cigarette smoking at follow-up between baseline e-cigarette users and nonusers. Other studies examined the difference at follow-up in cigarette smoking status among smokers according to e-cigarette use at baseline. Results suggest that, among never smokers, e-cigarette use is associated with the future (6 months to 2.5 years) cigarette trial; however, firm conclusions cannot be drawn because of limitations including small sample size, measurement of experimental use (ie, ever use, past 30-day use) rather than established use, and inadequate controls for potentially confounding variables. Conclusions also cannot be drawn from studies examining the impact of e-cigarette use among smokers due to the limited number of studies and additional limitations. A comprehensive understanding of this literature is needed to inform policy makers and consumers for evidence-based decision-making and to guide future research on e-cigarette use among youth and young adults. Implications: The present article provides a review of the impact of e-cigarette use on subsequent cigarette smoking among youth and YAs. Studies presented here suggest that e-cigarette use among nonsmokers is associated with subsequent cigarette smoking, but study designs are subject to numerous limitations. Future research should focus on addressing the characteristics that put youth and YAs at the risk of using either product and how appeal and accessibility of these products are related to product use in order to inform future policy-making.

Recognition, use and perceptions of JUUL among youth and young adults

Willett, J. G., Bennett, M., Hair, E. C., Xiao, H., Greenberg, M. S., Harvey, E., Cantrell, J., & Vallone, D. (n.d.). In Tobacco control.

Publication year

2019

Volume

28

Issue

1

Page(s)

115-116

A multidisciplinary approach to health campaign effectiveness

Cost and threshold analysis of the finishit campaign to prevent youth smoking in the United States

Effects of the truth FinishIt brand on tobacco outcomes

Estimating the Pathways of an Antitobacco Campaign

Evidence of the impact of the truth finishit campaign

Examining perceptions about IQOS heated tobacco product: Consumer studies in Japan and Switzerland

Hair, E. C., Bennett, M., Sheen, E., Cantrell, J., Briggs, J., Fenn, Z., Willett, J. G., & Vallone, D. (n.d.).

Publication year

2018

Journal title

Tobacco control

Volume

27

Page(s)

s70-s73
Abstract
Abstract
Objective To examine consumer perceptions, attitudes and behaviours regarding the heated tobacco product, IQOS, as well as to document the product's marketing strategies to determine its potential for appealing to youth and young adults. Method Truth Initiative, in collaboration with Flamingo, collected qualitative data via: (1) expert interviews, (2) semiotic analysis of IQOS packing and marketing materials, and (3) 12 focus groups with adults in Switzerland (ages 19-44 years; June 6-9, 2016) and Japan (ages 20-39 years; June 22-24, 2016) (n=68 for both groups). Results Expert interviews and IQOS packing and marketing analyses revealed the product is being marketed as a clean, chic and pure product, which resonated very well in Japan given the strong cultural values of order, cleanliness, quality and respect for others. Focus groups results indicated Japanese IQOS users used the product for socialising with non-smokers. Focus group participants in both Japan and Switzerland reported lower levels of satisfaction with the product relative to combustible cigarettes, although many found the product packaging to be appealing. While participants identified several benefits and barriers related to IQOS, few reported any potential health benefits of use compared with combustible tobacco products. Conclusion IQOS was marketed as a sophisticated, high tech and aspirational product. Because youth and young adults are more interested in such product positioning, this approach raises some concern about youth appeal. This research shows cultural factors appeared to affect the appeal of this messaging, indicating that prevalence and uptake data will likely not be similar from country to country.

It's getting late: improving completion rates in a hard-to-reach sample

Cantrell, J., Bennett, M., Thomas, R. K., Rath, J. M., Hair, E. C., & Vallone, D. (n.d.).

Publication year

2018

Journal title

Survey Practice

Patterns in first and daily cigarette initiation among youth and young adults from 2002 to 2015

Cantrell, J., Bennett, M., Mowery, P., Xiao, H., Rath, J., Hair, E., & Vallone, D. (n.d.).

Publication year

2018

Journal title

PloS one

Volume

13

Issue

8
Abstract
Abstract
This study’s objective was to describe long-term trends and patterns in first cigarette use (cigarette initiation) and daily cigarette use (daily initiation) among youth and young adults in the U.S. We used cross-sectional survey data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002–2015, to estimate annual incidence of first cigarette use (N = 270,556) and first daily cigarette use (N = 373,464) for each year by age groups, race/ethnicity and gender, examining trends over time and the average annual change in initiation for each group. Several clear patterns emerged: 1) cigarette initiation and daily initiation significantly decreased over time among those aged 12–14 and 15–17 and these trends were consistent among nearly all racial/ethnic and gender subgroups; 2) among 18–21 year olds, cigarette initiation sharply increased through 2009, surpassing rates among 15–17 year olds, and sharply declined through 2015 while remaining higher than rates among the younger group, and this trend was consistent for almost all racial/ethnic subgroups; 3) daily initiation for those aged 18–21 significantly declined, and this was significant among most subgroups 4) there was no change in cigarette initiation and daily initiation for 22–25 year olds overall and most subgroups; 5) there was a significant increase in cigarette initiation for 22–25 year old Hispanics males and daily initiation for 22–25 year old males. This study provides a comprehensive look at trends in cigarette and daily initiation among U.S. youth and young adults. Despite notable declines in smoking initiation among youth and young adult populations over the last two decades, targeted prevention and policy efforts are needed for subgroups at higher risk, including young adults and Hispanic males.

Recruiting and retaining youth and young adults: Challenges and opportunities in survey research for tobacco control

Swisher Sweets a Artist Project': Using musical events to promote cigars

Ganz, O., Rose, S. W., & Cantrell, J. (n.d.).

Publication year

2018

Journal title

Tobacco control

Volume

27

Page(s)

E93-E95

Correlates of cigar use by type and flavor among U.S. young adults: 2011-2015

Glasser, A. M., Johnson, A. L., Rose, S. W., Ganz, O., Cantrell, J., Delnevo, C. D., & Villanti, A. C. (n.d.).

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Tobacco Regulatory Science

Harnessing Youth and Young Adult Culture: Improving the Reach and Engagement of the truth® Campaign

Hair, E., Pitzer, L., Bennett, M., Halenar, M., Rath, J., Cantrell, J., Dorrler, N., Asche, E., & Vallone, D. (n.d.).

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Journal of Health Communication

Volume

22

Issue

7

Page(s)

568-575
Abstract
Abstract
The national youth and young adult tobacco prevention mass media campaign, truth®, relaunched in 2014 with the goal of creating “the generation that ends smoking.” The objective of this study was to assess whether the strategy of airing truth ads during popular, culturally relevant televised events was associated with higher ad and brand awareness and increases in social media engagement. Awareness of six truth advertisements that aired during popular television events and self-reported social media engagement were assessed via cross-sectional online surveys of youth and young adults aged 15–21 years. Social engagement was also measured using separate Twitter and YouTube metrics. Logistic regression models predicted self-reported social engagement and any ad awareness, and a negative binomial regression predicted the total social media engagement across digital platforms. The study found that viewing a popular televised event was associated with higher odds of ad awareness and social engagement. The results also indicate that levels of social media engagement for an event period are greater than for a nonevent period. The findings demonstrate that premiering advertisements during a popular, culturally relevant televised event is associated with higher awareness of truth ads and increased social engagement related to the campaign, controlling for variables that might also influence the response to campaign messages.

Contact

jennifer.cantrell@nyu.edu 708 Broadway 6FL New York, NY, 10003