Thomas Kirchner

Thomas Kirchner
Thomas Kirchner

Assistant Professor of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Professional overview

Dr. Thomas Kirchner is a clinical-health psychologist and methodologist interested in the analysis and graphical representation of longitudinal and geographic data, including methodologies that link individual behavior to the real-time context in which it occurs. Dr. Kirchner’s research targets momentary influences on the maintenance of health-related behavior utilizing both field-based (ecological momentary assessment) and laboratory-based paradigms. These geographic information systems and analytical methods can then inform public health, research, and policy.

As the Director and Principal Investigator of the mHealth (mobile health) Lab, Dr. Kirchner uses GIS to understand health-related behavior and decision-making in real time (e.g., how people make decisions about what they eat and drink, the places they go to exercise in their neighborhoods, the amount of time they spend outdoors, and whether they smoke cigarettes and/or marijuana).  In the Lab, students apply mHealth tools to explore geospatial systems, technology, research, and community advocacy. Students learn how to leverage the power of their cell phones to collect data about neighborhoods and experiences. In the POSSE (Point-of-sale Surveillance and Exposure) study, data is used to understand how tobacco-use behaviors are influenced in real-time by socio-contextual factors in real-world settings. Another initiative is exploring the link between marijuana and electronic vaporizers and the way legalization, decriminalization, and medicalization policies influence attitudes and decision-making about marijuana use in Colorado.

At CUSP - a public-private research center that observes, analyzes, and models cities to optimize outcomes, prototype new solutions, formalize new tools and processes, and develop new expertise/experts - Dr. Kirchner actively engages students and mentors projects.

Education

MS, Clinical and Biological/Health Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
PhD, Clinical and Biological/Health Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA

Areas of research and study

Behavioral Determinants of Health
Geographic Information Science (GIS)
Geographically-explicit EMA
Longitudinal Data Analysis
Social Behaviors
Urban Informatics
Urban Science

Publications

Publications

An African-specific haplotype in MRGPRX4 is associated with menthol cigarette smoking

Kozlitina, J., Risso, D., Lansu, K., Olsen, R. H. J., Sainz, E., Luiselli, D., Barik, A., Frigerio-Domingues, C., Pagani, L., Wooding, S., Kirchner, T., Niaura, R., Roth, B., & Drayna, D.

Publication year

2019

Journal title

PLoS genetics

Volume

15

Issue

2

Page(s)

e1007916
Abstract
In the U.S., more than 80% of African-American smokers use mentholated cigarettes, compared to less than 30% of Caucasian smokers. The reasons for these differences are not well understood. To determine if genetic variation contributes to mentholated cigarette smoking, we performed an exome-wide association analysis in a multiethnic population-based sample from Dallas, TX (N = 561). Findings were replicated in an independent cohort of African Americans from Washington, DC (N = 741). We identified a haplotype of MRGPRX4 (composed of rs7102322[G], encoding N245S, and rs61733596[G], T43T), that was associated with a 5-to-8 fold increase in the odds of menthol cigarette smoking. The variants are present solely in persons of African ancestry. Functional studies indicated that the variant G protein-coupled receptor encoded by MRGPRX4 displays reduced agonism in both arrestin-based and G protein-based assays, and alteration of agonism by menthol. These data indicate that genetic variation in MRGPRX4 contributes to inter-individual and inter-ethnic differences in the preference for mentholated cigarettes, and that the existence of genetic factors predisposing vulnerable populations to mentholated cigarette smoking can inform tobacco control and public health policies.

Crowdsourcing for Food Purchase Receipt Annotation via Amazon Mechanical Turk: A Feasibility Study

Lu, W., Guttentag, A., Elbel, B. D., Kiszko, K., Abrams, C., & Kirchner, T.

Publication year

2019

Journal title

Journal of medical Internet research

Volume

21

Issue

4

Page(s)

e12047
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The decisions that individuals make about the food and beverage products they purchase and consume directly influence their energy intake and dietary quality and may lead to excess weight gain and obesity. However, gathering and interpreting data on food and beverage purchase patterns can be difficult. Leveraging novel sources of data on food and beverage purchase behavior can provide us with a more objective understanding of food consumption behaviors. OBJECTIVE: Food and beverage purchase receipts often include time-stamped location information, which, when associated with product purchase details, can provide a useful behavioral measurement tool. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility, reliability, and validity of processing data from fast-food restaurant receipts using crowdsourcing via Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk). METHODS: Between 2013 and 2014, receipts (N=12,165) from consumer purchases were collected at 60 different locations of five fast-food restaurant chains in New Jersey and New York City, USA (ie, Burger King, KFC, McDonald's, Subway, and Wendy's). Data containing the restaurant name, location, receipt ID, food items purchased, price, and other information were manually entered into an MS Access database and checked for accuracy by a second reviewer; this was considered the gold standard. To assess the feasibility of coding receipt data via MTurk, a prototype set of receipts (N=196) was selected. For each receipt, 5 turkers were asked to (1) identify the receipt identifier and the name of the restaurant and (2) indicate whether a beverage was listed in the receipt; if yes, they were to categorize the beverage as cold (eg, soda or energy drink) or hot (eg, coffee or tea). Interturker agreement for specific questions (eg, restaurant name and beverage inclusion) and agreement between turker consensus responses and the gold standard values in the manually entered dataset were calculated. RESULTS: Among the 196 receipts completed by turkers, the interturker agreement was 100% (196/196) for restaurant names (eg, Burger King, McDonald's, and Subway), 98.5% (193/196) for beverage inclusion (ie, hot, cold, or none), 92.3% (181/196) for types of hot beverage (eg, hot coffee or hot tea), and 87.2% (171/196) for types of cold beverage (eg, Coke or bottled water). When compared with the gold standard data, the agreement level was 100% (196/196) for restaurant name, 99.5% (195/196) for beverage inclusion, and 99.5% (195/196) for beverage types. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicated high interrater agreement for questions across difficulty levels (eg, single- vs binary- vs multiple-choice items). Compared with traditional methods for coding receipt data, MTurk can produce excellent-quality data in a lower-cost, more time-efficient manner.

Ecological momentary assessment of various tobacco product use among young adults

Berg, C. J., Haardörfer, R., Payne, J. B., Getachew, B., Vu, M., Guttentag, A., & Kirchner, T.

Publication year

2019

Journal title

Addictive Behaviors

Volume

92

Page(s)

38-46
Abstract
Introduction: Young adults are at high risk for using traditional and novel tobacco products. However, little is known about daily/weekly use patterns or psychosocial triggers for using various tobacco products. Methods: This ecological momentary assessment (EMA) study examined timing, tobacco cravings, affect, social context, and other substance use (alcohol, marijuana) in relation to use of cigarettes, electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), and any tobacco product (i.e., cigarettes, ENDS, cigars, hookah), respectively. We also examined interactions between these predictors, sex, and race/ethnicity. From a longitudinal study of 3418 18–25 year-olds from seven Georgia colleges/universities, we recruited 72 reporting current tobacco use to participate in the 21-day EMA study; 43 participated, of which 31 completed ≥66% assessments and were analyzed. Cravings, affect, social context, and substance use were assessed daily across four four-hour windows. Results: Of the 31 participants, average age was 21.10 years (SD = 1.95), 45.2% were female, and 71.0% non-Hispanic White; 71.0% used cigarettes, 58.1% ENDS, 38.7% cigars, and 25.8% hookah (25.6% used one product, 46.5% two, 27.9% ≥ three). Predictors of cigarette use included higher anxiety, greater odds of marijuana and alcohol use, and higher boredom levels among women. Predictors of ENDS use included being non-White and greater odds of marijuana use, as well as higher tobacco cravings among women and higher boredom among men. Predictors of any tobacco product use included being non-White, higher boredom levels, and greater odds of marijuana and alcohol use. Conclusions: Distinct interventions may be needed to address use of differing tobacco products among young adults.

Flavored cigar smoking among African American young adult dual users: An ecological momentary assessment

Chen-Sankey, J. C., Choi, K., Kirchner, T., Feldman, R. H., Butler, J., & Mead, E. L.

Publication year

2019

Journal title

Drug and Alcohol Dependence

Volume

196

Page(s)

79-85
Abstract
Background: Flavored cigar sales have increased in recent years in the U.S. African American young adults (AAYAs) have high prevalence of smoking flavored cigars and dual use with cigarettes, but the predictors of use are unclear. We examined the predictors of flavored cigar smoking among AAYA dual users. Methods: We analyzed data from an Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) study that captured near real-time affect, smoking cues, and tobacco smoking from eight text-messaging surveys per day over two weeks. Sixty-three AAYA (ages 18–29) dual users of cigarettes and cigars recorded 1205 cigar smoking moments. Multivariable Generalized Estimating Equations were used to assess the predictors of smoking cigars with flavors and specific flavor types. Results: Half of the participants were women (49.2%) and aged between 18–24 (46.7%). Over the two-weeks, almost all (98.4%) participants smoked flavored cigars, and 64.2% of the cigars smoked were flavored. Alcohol (34.4%) was the most frequently smoked flavor type followed by sweet (23.4%) and mint (5.7%). Feeling stressed (AOR = 1.07) and bored (AOR = 1.10) predicted smoking alcohol flavors. Blunt smoking positively predicted smoking sweet flavors (AOR = 4.79), but negatively predicted smoking alcohol flavors (AOR = 0.40). Conclusions: Smoking flavored cigars, especially alcohol-flavored cigars, was prevalent among AAYA dual users in this study. This group might use specific flavors for different purposes including smoking blunts and boosting mood. Efforts to reduce cigar use need to tackle these risk factors and the increased marketing and low-cost pricing of cigars. A federal ban of cigar flavors might reduce the appeal of cigar products.

An ecological momentary assessment of cigarette and cigar dual use among African American Young Adults

Mead, E. L., Chen, J. C., Kirchner, T., Butler, J., & Feldman, R. H.

Publication year

2018

Journal title

Nicotine and Tobacco Research

Volume

20

Page(s)

S12-S21
Abstract
Introduction The dual use of cigarettes and cigars among African American young adults is a significant public health issue. Patterns of and reasons for dual use are difficult to capture using traditional self-report methods. This study used ecological momentary assessment (EMA) to characterize patterns of dual smoking and examine the personal and environmental predictors of cigarette and cigar smoking among African American young adult dual users (ages 18-29) in real-time. Methods For 14 days, 64 participants smoked ad libitum and were prompted four times daily to record their smoking, craving, emotions, social smoking, and environment via text message on their mobile phones. The odds of single product and dual use were examined using adjusted generalized estimating equations. Results Participants smoked an average of 7.9 cigarettes and 4.2 cigars per day. Cigarettes and cigars were smoked as frequently during periods of dual use as they were during periods of single product use. Cigarette craving was positively associated with cigarette-only smoking (OR: 1.07), whereas cigar craving was positively associated with cigar-only smoking (OR: 1.43) and dual use (OR: 1.08). Cigars had the greatest odds of dual use when with others (OR: 4.69) and in others' homes (OR: 4.33). Cigarettes had the greatest odds of being smoked while alone (OR: 1.57). Conclusions EMA was useful for capturing variable smoking patterns and predictors. In this study population, cigarettes and cigars appeared to be smoked additively, and cigars smoked socially. These findings can inform future interventions addressing dual use in this high priority population. Implications This is the first study to use EMA to examine naturalistic patterns and predictors of multiple tobacco use in real-time. African American young adults smoked cigarettes and cigars during periods of dual use as frequently as during periods of single product use. This suggests that most use was additive (one product smoked in addition to another) and less often as substitution (one product smoked instead of another). Social smoking and craving were strongly associated with cigar smoking in single and dual use periods. This study suggests the need for cessation messaging specifically targeted to reduce dual use in this population.

Acceptability of ecological momentary assessment among young men who have sex with men

Duncan, D. T., Kapadia, F., Kirchner, T. R., Goedel, W. C., Brady, W. J., & Halkitis, P. N.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Journal of LGBT Youth

Volume

14

Issue

4

Page(s)

436-444
Abstract
The study evaluated the acceptability of text message– and voice-based ecological momentary assessment (EMA) methods among a sample (N = 74) of young men who have sex with men (MSM). We assessed the acceptability of text message– and voice-based EMA methods. Almost all participants (96%) reported that they would be willing to accept texts on their smartphone to answer questions about their current mood, surroundings, or feelings. A large majority (89%) also reported being willing to accept phone calls to answer these questions. This work suggests that different EMA methods are acceptable for use among young MSM.

Beyond blunts: reasons for cigarette and cigar use among African American young adult dual users

Mead, E. L., Lindstrom Johnson, S., Siddiqui, J., Butler, J., Kirchner, T., & Feldman, R. H.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Addiction Research and Theory

Page(s)

1-11
Abstract
Background: African American young adults are at high risk for dual use of cigarettes and cigars. Limited work has explored and characterized the reasons for use in this population and their relative importance for initiation and current smoking of these products. Method: Reasons for cigarette and cigar use were systematically explored and categorized using a mixed methods participatory approach called concept mapping. A series of in-person group sessions were held with 30 African American young adult (ages 18–29) current smokers of both cigarettes and cigars in Prince George’s County, MD and Washington, DC. Participants brainstormed, sorted, rated, and interpreted their reasons for initiation and past 30-day use of cigarettes and cigars. A cluster map was generated using multi-dimensional scaling, and t-tests were used to explore differences in ratings by background characteristics. Results: Participants generated 64 reasons for smoking cigarettes and cigars, and categorized these reasons into six groups: emotions, urges, access, product characteristics, lifestyle, and outside pressure. Emotions and urges were the most important motivations for initiation and current smoking of both products. Product characteristics were significantly more important for cigar initiation and smoking than for cigarettes, and outside pressure was more important for current smoking of cigars than cigarettes. Ratings differed by gender, socioeconomic status, and smoking characteristics. Conclusions: Cigarette and cigar smoking have several overlapping motivations, but key differences were also found, most notably for product characteristics. The FDA’s regulation of cigars and cigarettes should focus on addressing key characteristics appealing to young adults to curb dual use.

Indicators of dependence for different types of tobacco product users: Descriptive findings from Wave 1 (2013–2014) of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) study

Strong, D. R., Pearson, J., Ehlke, S., Kirchner, T., Abrams, D., Taylor, K., Compton, W. M., Conway, K. P., Lambert, E., Green, V. R., Hull, L. C., Evans, S. E., Cummings, K. M., Goniewicz, M., Hyland, A., & Niaura, R.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Drug and Alcohol Dependence

Volume

178

Page(s)

257-266
Abstract
Background and aims With no established standard for assessing tobacco dependence (TD) across tobacco products in surveys, the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study provides a unique platform for examining the psychometric properties and validity of multiple indicators of tobacco dependence across a range of tobacco products. Participants A U.S. nationally representative sample from the 32,320 adult Wave 1 interviews with analyses focused on 14,287 respondents who were current established users of tobacco products. Findings This analysis confirms a single primary latent construct underlying responses to TD indicators for cigarettes, e-cigarettes, cigars, hookah, and smokeless tobacco products. Mutually exclusive past year tobacco-user groups included: cigarette only (n = 8689), e-cigarette only (n = 437), cigar only (traditional, cigarillo, or filtered) (n = 706), hookah only (n = 461), smokeless tobacco only (n = 971), cigarette plus e-cigarette (n = 709), and multiple tobacco product users (n = 2314). Differential Item Functioning (DIF) analyses supported use of 16 of the 24 examined TD indicators for comparisons across tobacco users. With cigarette users as a reference (mean = 0.0, SD = 1.0), we observed a range of TD with hookah (mean = −1.71) and cigar (mean = −1.92) only users being the lowest, and cigarette plus e-cigarette product users being the highest (mean = 0.35). Regression models including sociodemographic factors supported concurrent validity with increased product use frequency and TD among cigarette-only (p < 0.001), e-cigarette only (p < 0.002), cigar (p < 0.001), hookah only (p < 0.001), and smokeless tobacco users (p < 0.001). Conclusion The PATH Study Adult Wave 1 Questionnaire provided psychometrically valid measures of TD that enables future regulatory investigations of nicotine dependence across tobacco products.

A randomized trial comparing the effect of nicotine versus placebo electronic cigarettes on smoking reduction among young adult smokers

Tseng, T. Y., Ostroff, J. S., Campo, A., Gerard, M., Kirchner, T., Rotrosen, J., & Shelley, D.

Publication year

2016

Journal title

Nicotine and Tobacco Research

Volume

18

Issue

10

Page(s)

1937-1943
Abstract
Introduction: Electronic cigarette (EC) use is growing dramatically with use highest among young adults and current smokers. One of the most common reasons for using ECs is interest in quitting or reducing cigarettes per day (CPD); however there are few randomized controlled trials (RCT) on the effect of ECs on smoking abstinence and reduction. Methods: We conducted a two-arm; double-blind RCT. Subjects were randomized to receive 3-weeks of either disposable 4.5% nicotine EC (intervention) or placebo EC. The primary outcome was self-reported reduction of at least 50% in the number of CPDs smoked at week 3 (end of treatment) compared to baseline. Study subjects (n = 99) were young adult (21-35), current smokers (smoked ≥ 10 CPDs) living in NYC. Results: Compared with baseline, a significant reduction in CPDs was observed at both study time periods (1 and 3 weeks) for intervention (P < .001) and placebo (P < .001) groups. Between-group analyses showed significantly fewer CPDs in the intervention group compared to the placebo group at week 3 (P = .03), but not at any other follow-up periods. The logistic regression analysis showed that using a greater number of ECs, treatment condition and higher baseline readiness to quit were significantly associated with achieving at least 50% reduction in CPDs at the end of treatment. Conclusion: A diverse young adult sample of current everyday smokers, who were not ready to quit, was able to reduce smoking with the help of ECs. Further study is needed to establish the role of both placebo and nicotine containing ECs in increasing both reduction and subsequent cessation. Implications: Despite the critical need for well-designed clinical trials on the effect of ECs on cessation and cigarette reduction, the majority of studies have been observational or noncomparative intervention designs. Only three RCTs studying ECs as a cessation or reduction intervention have been published, and none were conducted in the United States. The current study adds knowledge to current literature on the feasibility of using ECs to aid smoking reduction among young smokers in US urban populations.

American spirit pack descriptors and perceptions of harm: A crowdsourced comparison of modified packs

Pearson, J. L., Richardson, A., Feirman, S. P., Villanti, A. C., Cantrell, J., Cohn, A., Tacelosky, M., & Kirchner, T. R.

Publication year

2016

Journal title

Nicotine and Tobacco Research

Volume

18

Issue

8

Page(s)

1749-1756
Abstract
Introduction: In 2015, the Food and Drug Administration issued warnings to three tobacco manufacturers who label their cigarettes as "additive-free" and/or "natural" on the grounds that they make unauthorized reduced risk claims. The goal of this study was to examine US adults' perceptions of three American Spirit (AS) pack descriptors ("Made with Organic Tobacco," "100% Additive-Free," and "100% US Grown Tobacco") to assess if they communicate reduced risk. Methods: In September 2012, three cross-sectional surveys were posted on Amazon Mechanical Turk. Adult participants evaluated the relative harm of a Marlboro Red pack versus three different AS packs with the descriptors "Made with Organic Tobacco," "100% Additive-Free," or "100% US Grown Tobacco" (Survey 1; n = 461); a Marlboro Red pack versus these AS packs modified to exclude descriptors (Survey 2; n = 857); and unmodified versus modified AS pack images (Survey 3; n = 1001). Results: The majority of Survey 1 participants rated the unmodified AS packs as less harmful than the Marlboro Red pack; 35.4%-58.8% of Survey 2 participants also rated the modified (no claims) packs as less harmful than Marlboro Red. In these surveys, prior use of AS cigarettes was associated with reduced perceptions of risk (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.59-2.40). "Made with Organic Tobacco" and "100% Additive-Free" were associated with reduced perceptions of risk when comparing the modified versus the unmodified AS packs (Survey 3). Conclusions: Data suggest that these AS pack descriptors communicate reduced harm messages to consumers. Findings have implications for regulatory actions related to product labeling and packaging. Implications: These findings provide additional evidence that the "Made with Organic Tobacco," "100% Additive-Free," and "100% US Grown" descriptors, as well as other aspects of the AS pack design, communicate reduced harm to non-, current, and former smokers. Additionally, they provide support for the importance of FDA's 2015 warning to Santa Fe Natural Tobacco Company on "100% Additive Free" as an unauthorized modified risk claim.

Spatio-temporal determinants of mental health and well-being: advances in geographically-explicit ecological momentary assessment (GEMA)

Kirchner, T. R., & Shiffman, S.

Publication year

2016

Journal title

Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology

Page(s)

1-13
Abstract
Purpose: Overview of geographically explicit momentary assessment research, applied to the study of mental health and well-being, which allows for cross-validation, extension, and enrichment of research on place and health. Methods: Building on the historical foundations of both ecological momentary assessment and geographic momentary assessment research, this review explores their emerging synergy into a more generalized and powerful research framework. Results: Geographically explicit momentary assessment methods are rapidly advancing across a number of complimentary literatures that intersect but have not yet converged. Key contributions from these areas reveal tremendous potential for transdisciplinary and translational science. Conclusions: Mobile communication devices are revolutionizing research on mental health and well-being by physically linking momentary experience sampling to objective measures of socio-ecological context in time and place. Methodological standards are not well-established and will be required for transdisciplinary collaboration and scientific inference moving forward.

The Moment Study: Protocol for a mixed method observational cohort study of the Alternative Nicotine Delivery Systems (ANDS) initiation process among adult cigarette smokers

Pearson, J. L., Smiley, S. L., Rubin, L. F., Anesetti-Rothermel, A., Elmasry, H., Davis, M., De Atley, T., Harvey, E., Kirchner, T., & Abrams, D. B.

Publication year

2016

Journal title

BMJ Open

Volume

6

Issue

4
Abstract
Introduction: Alternative Nicotine Delivery Systems (ANDS) such as e-cigarettes are battery-powered devices that aerosolize nicotine and other substances to simulate smoking without using tobacco. Little is known about the ANDS initiation process among adult smokers. The aims of this research are threefold to: (1) examine how ANDS use affects cigarette use; (2) examine how the immediate environmental and psychosocial contexts of cigarette and ANDS use vary within - and between - participants in general and by menthol preference and race; and, (3) examine participants' 'lived experience' of the subjective perceptions, meaning, influences and utility of cigarette and ANDS use. Methods and analyses: This study's mixed method, 6-week longitudinal design will produce a detailed description of the ANDS initiation process among adult smokers (N=100). Qualitative and quantitative data collection will include 3 weeks of: (1) ecological momentary assessment of patterns of cigarette/ANDS use, satisfaction, mood and craving; (2) geospatial assessment of participants' environment, including indoor and outdoor cigarette/ANDS norms and rules; (3) in-depth interviews about the meaning and utility o cigarette smoking and ANDS use; and, (4) saliva cotinine and exhaled carbon monoxide (CO) biomarkers. A diverse sample will be recruited with an equal number of menthol and non-menthol cigarette smokers. As the primary independent variable, we will investigate how ANDS use affects cigarette consumption. We will also examine how smoking related and ANDS-related rules and norms surrounding product use influence cigarette and ANDS product use, and how the subjective effects of ANDS use affect ANDS perceptions, beliefs and use. Ethics and dissemination: This study was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse of the US National Institutes of Health (1R21DA036472), registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02261363), and approved by the Chesapeake IRB (Pro00008526). Findings will be disseminated to the scientific and lay community through presentations, reports and scientific publications.

Tobacco outlet density and converted versus native non-daily cigarette use in a national US sample

Kirchner, T. R., Anesetti-Rothermel, A., Bennett, M., Gao, H., Carlos, H., Scheuermann, T. S., Reitzel, L. R., & Ahluwalia, J. S.

Publication year

2016

Journal title

Tobacco Control
Abstract
Objective Investigate whether non-daily smokers' (NDS) cigarette price and purchase preferences, recent cessation attempts, and current intentions to quit are associated with the density of the retail cigarette product landscape surrounding their residential address. Participants Cross-sectional assessment of N=904 converted NDS (CNDS). who previously smoked every day, and N=297 native NDS (NNDS) who only smoked non-daily, drawn from a national panel. Outcome measures Kernel density estimation was used to generate a nationwide probability surface of tobacco outlets linked to participants' residential ZIP code. Hierarchically nested log-linear models were compared to evaluate associations between outlet density, non-daily use patterns, price sensitivity and quit intentions. Results Overall, NDS in ZIP codes with greater outlet density were less likely than NDS in ZIP codes with lower outlet density to hold 6-month quit intentions when they also reported that price affected use patterns (G2=66.1, p

Tobacco retail outlet density and young adult tobacco initiation

Cantrell, J., Pearson, J. L., Anesetti-Rothermel, A., Xiao, H., Kirchner, T. R., & Vallone, D.

Publication year

2016

Journal title

Nicotine and Tobacco Research

Volume

18

Issue

2

Page(s)

130-137
Abstract
Background: A growing body of evidence indicates that the density of tobacco retail outlets around the home residence may influence tobacco use among youth and adults. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of neighborhood tobacco retail outlet density on young adult initiation of different tobacco product types. Methods: Cross-sectional data from a 2013 nationally representative sample of young adults aged 18-34 was examined in relation to a 2012 geocoded listing of all outlets likely to sell tobacco in the United States. Separate multivariable logistic regression analyses examined associations between neighborhood outlet density and past 6 months first use of cigarettes, non-cigarette combustible products, and noncombustible products among adults aged 18-24 and 25-34. Results: Outlet density was significantly associated with recent initiation of cigarettes and other combustibles, but this impact varied for younger and older groups. Increased density was significantly associated with a higher likelihood of initiating cigarette use among adults aged 25-34 (OR = 3.75, 95% CI = 1.18, 11.90), and of initiating non-cigarette combustible use among 18-24 year olds (OR = 3.16, 95% CI = 1.03, 9.74). There was no impact of outlet density on recent noncombustible product initiation among either group. Conclusion: This study is the first to examine the impact of tobacco outlet density on young adult initiation of cigarettes and other tobacco products. Findings demonstrate that residential neighborhood outlet density is associated with recent initiation of combustible products and this effect varies by product type and age. The tobacco outlet environment may be a critical factor in promoting young adult tobacco use initiation.

Cigarette price variation around high schools: Evidence from Washington DC

Cantrell, J., Ganz, O., Anesetti-Rothermel, A., Harrell, P., Kreslake, J. M., Xiao, H., Pearson, J. L., Vallone, D., & Kirchner, T. R.

Publication year

2015

Journal title

Health and Place

Volume

31

Page(s)

193-198
Abstract
This study examines lowest cigarette prices in all tobacco retail outlets in Washington D.C. (. n=750) in relation to the type and number of high schools nearby, controlling for confounders. The lowest overall and Newport menthol prices were significantly lower at outlets near public non-charter and charter schools compared with outlets near private schools. Given higher smoking prevalence and more price-sensitive youth subgroups in U.S. public schools, exposure to low prices may contribute to tobacco-related health disparities in minority and low-income populations. Tobacco taxes combined with policies to minimize the increasing use of price as a marketing tool are critical.

Cue reactivity in converted and native intermittent smokers

Shiffman, S., Dunbar, M. S., Kirchner, T. R., Li, X., Tindle, H. A., Anderson, S. J., Scholl, S. M., & Ferguson, S. G.

Publication year

2015

Journal title

Nicotine and Tobacco Research

Volume

17

Issue

1

Page(s)

119-123
Abstract
Introduction: Nondaily, or intermittent smokers (ITS), who constitute a substantial fraction of U.S. smokers, are thought to smoke in response to cues. Previous cue reactivity research showed no difference between ITS and daily smokers in response to cues. This report examines whether "converted" ITS (CITS) with a history of past daily smoking differ from "native" ITS (NITS) in craving and smoking in response to cues. Methods: A total of 146 CITS (who previously smoked daily for at least 6 months) and 73 NITS participated. Participants were exposed to 5 active cues (smoking, alcohol, negative affect, positive affect, and smoking prohibitions) and a control neutral cue, in separate sessions. Changes in craving were assessed pre-post cue exposure. Smoking behavior (smoking [y/n], smoking latency, number of cigarettes, number of puffs, and increase in carbon monoxide [CO]) was observed. Analyses contrasted response to each active cue compared to the neutral cue and controlled for order effects and for time since last cigarette, which differed between groups. Results: Regardless of cues, CITS reported higher craving and greater change in craving, were more likely to smoke, tended to progress faster to smoking, and showed greater increases in CO when they did smoke. NITS and CITS showed similar cue reactivity on most measures, though NITS took more puffs after viewing smoking cues (compared to neutral) than did CITS. Conclusions: Though CITS show some remnants of their history of daily smoking, CITS and NITS demonstrate similar cue reactivity, suggesting that they would not require different behavioral approaches to help them quit.

Electronic cigarette advertising at the point-of-sale: A gap in tobacco control research

Ganz, O., Cantrell, J., Moon-Howard, J., Aidala, A., Kirchner, T. R., & Vallone, D.

Publication year

2015

Journal title

Tobacco Control

Volume

24

Page(s)

e110-e112

Implementation of a Multimodal Mobile System for Point-of-Sale Surveillance: Lessons Learned From Case Studies in Washington, DC, and New York City

Cantrell, J., Ganz, O., Ilakkuvan, V., Tacelosky, M., Kreslake, J., Moon-howard, J., Aidala, A., Vallone, D., Anesetti-rothermel, A., & Kirchner, T. R.

Publication year

2015

Journal title

JMIR Public Health and Surveillance

Volume

1

Issue

2

National enforcement of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act at point-of-sale

Kirchner, T., Villanti, A. C., Tacelosky, M., Anesetti-Rothermel, A., Gao, H., Pearson, J. L., Ganz, O., Cantrell, J., Vallone, D., & Abrams, D.

Publication year

2015

Journal title

Tobacco Regulatory Science

Volume

1

Issue

1

Page(s)

24-35

National Enforcement of the FSPTCA at Point-of-Sale

Kirchner, T. R., Villanti, A. C., Tacelosky, M., Anesetti-rothermel, A., Gao, H., Pearson, J., Ganz, O., Cantrell, J., Vallone, D. M., & Abrams, D. B.

Publication year

2015

Journal title

Tobacco Regulatory Science

Volume

1

Issue

1

Page(s)

24-35

The impact of the tobacco retail outlet environment on adult cessation and differences by neighborhood poverty

Cantrell, J., Anesetti-Rothermel, A., Pearson, J. L., Xiao, H., Vallone, D., & Kirchner, T. R.

Publication year

2015

Journal title

Addiction

Volume

110

Issue

1

Page(s)

152-161
Abstract
Aims: This study examined the impact of tobacco retail outlets on cessation outcomes over time among non-treatment-seeking smokers and assessed differences by neighborhood poverty and individual factors. Design: Observational longitudinal cohort study using geospatial data. We used generalized estimating equations to examine cessation outcomes in relation to the proximity and density of tobacco retail outlets near the home. Setting: Eight large Designated Media Areas across the United States. Participants: A total of 2377 baseline smokers followed over three waves from 2008 to 2010. Measurements: Outlet addresses were identified through North American Industry Classification System codes and proximity and density measures were constructed for each participant at each wave. Outcomes included past 30-day abstinence and pro-cessation attitudes. Findings: Smokers in high poverty census tracts living between 500m and 1.9km from an outlet were over two times more likely to be abstinent than those living fewer than 500m from an outlet (P

Tobacco retail outlet advertising practices and proximity to schools, parks and public housing affect Synar underage sales violations in Washington, DC

Kirchner, T. R., Villanti, A. C., Cantrell, J., Anesetti-Rothermel, A., Ganz, O., Conway, K. P., Vallone, D. M., & Abrams, D. B.

Publication year

2015

Journal title

Tobacco Control

Volume

24

Page(s)

e52-e58
Abstract
Objective To examine the cross-sectional association between illicit sales of tobacco to minors, Washington DC tobacco outlet advertising practices, retail store type, the demographic make-up of the area surrounding each outlet, and the proximity of each outlet to high schools, recreational parks and public housing. Participants Seven hundred and fifty tobacco outlets in the DC area, n=347 of which were randomly selected for inspection by the Synar Inspection Program in 2009–2010. Main outcome measures The presence of tobacco advertisements on the interior and exterior of each outlet, and illicit tobacco sales to Synar Inspection Program youth volunteers. Results The presence of tobacco advertisements on the exterior of gas stations was much greater than on other retail store types (OR=6.68; 95% CI 4.05 to 11.01), as was the absence of any advertisements at bars or restaurants that sold tobacco (OR=0.33; 95% CI 0.22 to 0.52). Exterior tobacco advertisements were also more likely in predominantly African–American areas of the city (OR=3.11; 95% CI 2.28 to 4.25), and particularly likely on storefronts located closer to parks (OR=1.87; 95% CI 1.06 to 3.28). Illicit sales to minors were more common at gas stations (OR=3.01; 95% CI 1.5 to 6.3), outlets that displayed exterior tobacco advertisements closer to parks (OR=3.36; 95% CI 1.38 to 8.21), and outlets located closer to high schools in majority African– American block groups (OR=1.29; 95% CI 1.07 to 1.58). Conclusions Findings demonstrate that while illicit tobacco sales to minors are occurring at acceptably low rates by Synar standards, illicit sales vary considerably by retail store type, advertising approach and proximity to high schools, parks and African–American residential areas. Future work may help inform regulatory efforts to reduce youth access at the neighbourhood, city, state and national levels.

Cameras for Public Health Surveillance: A Methods Protocol for Crowdsourced Annotation of Point-of-Sale Photographs

Ilakkuvan, V., Tacelosky, M., Ivey, K. C., Pearson, J. L., Cantrell, J., Vallone, D. M., Abrams, D. B., & Kirchner, T. R.

Publication year

2014

Journal title

JMIR Research Protocols

Volume

3

Issue

2

Page(s)

e22

Cantrell et al. Respond

Cantrell, J., Kreslake, J., Ganz, O., Pearson, J. L., Vallone, D. M., Anesetti-Rothermel, A., Xiao, H., & Kirchner, T. R.

Publication year

2014

Journal title

American Journal of Public Health

Volume

104

Issue

4

Crowdsourcing applications for public health

Brabham, D. C., Ribisl, K. M., Kirchner, T. R., & Bernhardt, J. M.

Publication year

2014

Journal title

American Journal of Preventive Medicine

Volume

46

Issue

2

Page(s)

179-187
Abstract
Crowdsourcing is an online, distributed, problem-solving, and production model that uses the collective intelligence of networked communities for specific purposes. Although its use has benefited many sectors of society, it has yet to be fully realized as a method for improving public health. This paper defines the core components of crowdsourcing and proposes a framework for understanding the potential utility of crowdsourcing in the domain of public health. Four discrete crowdsourcing approaches are described (knowledge discovery and management; distributed human intelligence tasking; broadcast search; and peer-vetted creative production types) and a number of potential applications for crowdsourcing for public health science and practice are enumerated.

Contact

tom.kirchner@nyu.edu +1 (646) 847-8846 715/719 Broadway New York, NY 10003