Olugbenga Ogedegbe

Olugbenga Ogedegbe
Olugbenga Ogedegbe

Professor

Professional overview

Gbenga Ogedegbe, a physician, is Professor of Population Health & Medicine, Chief Division of Health & Behavior and Director Center for Healthful Behavior Change in the Department of Population Health at the School of Medicine. Gbenga is a leading expert on health disparities research; his work focuses on the implementation of evidence-based interventions for cardiovascular risk reduction in minority populations. He is Principal Investigator on numerous NIH projects, and has expanded his work globally to Sub-Saharan Africa where he is funded by the NIH to strengthen research capacity and reduce the burden of noncommunicable diseases. He has co-authored over 250 publications and his work has been recognized by receipt of several research and mentoring awards including the prestigious John M. Eisenberg Excellence in Mentorship Award from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the Daniel Savage Science Award. He has served on numerous scientific panels including the NIH, CDC, World Health Organization, and the European Union Research Council. Prior to joining NYU, he was faculty at Cornell Weill Medical School and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

Education

MPH from Columbia University, 1999
Residency, Montefiore Medical Center, Internal Medicine, 1998
MD from Donetsk University, 1988

Areas of research and study

Access to Healthcare
Global Health
Health of Marginalized Population
Implementation and Impact of Public Health Regulations
Implementation science
Stroke and Cardiovascular Disease

Publications

Publications

Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality in Adults Aged ≥60 Years According to Recommendations by the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association and American College of Physicians/American Academy of Family Physicians

Jaeger, B. C., Anstey, D. E., Bress, A. P., Booth, J. N., Butler, M., Clark, D., Howard, G., Kalinowski, J., Long, D. L., Ogedegbe, O., Plante, T. B., Shimbo, D., Sims, M., Supiano, M. A., Whelton, P. K., & Muntner, P.

Publication year

2019

Journal title

Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979)

Volume

73

Issue

2

Page(s)

327-334
Abstract
In 2017, the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) and the American College of Physicians/American Academy of Family Physicians (ACP/AAFP) published blood pressure guidelines. Adults recommended antihypertensive medication initiation or intensification by the ACP/AAFP guideline receive the same recommendation from the ACC/AHA guideline. However, many adults ≥60 years old are recommended to initiate or intensify antihypertensive medication by the ACC/AHA but not the ACP/AAFP guideline. We compared atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease event rates according to antihypertensive treatment recommendations in the ACC/AHA and ACP/AAFP guidelines among adults ≥60 years old with systolic blood pressure ≥130 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure ≥80 mm Hg in the REGARDS study (Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke) and the JHS (Jackson Heart Study). Among 4311 participants not taking antihypertensive medication at baseline, 11.4%, 61.2%, and 27.4% were recommended antihypertensive medication initiation by neither guideline, the ACC/AHA but not the ACP/AAFP guideline, and both guidelines, respectively. Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease event rates (95% CI) for these groups were 3.4 (1.6-5.2), 18.0 (16.1-19.8), and 25.3 (21.9-28.6) per 1000 person-years, respectively. Among 7281 participants taking antihypertensive medication at baseline, 57.9% and 42.1% were recommended antihypertensive medication intensification by the ACC/AHA but not the ACP/AAFP guideline and both guidelines, respectively. Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease event rates (95% CI) for these groups were 18.2 (16.7-19.7) and 33.0 (30.5-35.4) per 1000 person-years, respectively. In conclusion, adults recommended initiation or intensification of antihypertensive medication by the ACC/AHA but not the ACP/AAFP guideline have high atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk that may be reduced through treatment initiation or intensification.

Different Relationship Between Systolic Blood Pressure and Cerebral Perfusion in Subjects With and Without Hypertension

Glodzik, L., Rusinek, H., Tsui, W., Pirraglia, E., Kim, H. J., Deshpande, A., Li, Y., Storey, P., Randall, C., Chen, J., Osorio, R. S., Butler, T., Tanzi, E., McQuillan, M., Harvey, P., Williams, S. K., Ogedegbe, O., Babb, J. S., & De Leon, M. J.

Publication year

2019

Journal title

Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979)

Volume

73

Issue

1

Page(s)

197-205
Abstract
Although there is an increasing agreement that hypertension is associated with cerebrovascular compromise, relationships between blood pressure (BP) and cerebral blood flow are not fully understood. It is not known what BP level, and consequently what therapeutic goal, is optimal for brain perfusion. Moreover, there is limited data on how BP affects hippocampal perfusion, a structure critically involved in memory. We conducted a cross-sectional (n=445) and longitudinal (n=185) study of adults and elderly without dementia or clinically apparent stroke, who underwent clinical examination and brain perfusion assessment (age 69.2±7.5 years, 62% women, 45% hypertensive). Linear models were used to test baseline BP-blood flow relationship and to examine how changes in BP influence changes in perfusion. In the entire group, systolic BP (SBP) was negatively related to cortical (β=-0.13, P=0.005) and hippocampal blood flow (β=-0.12, P=0.01). Notably, this negative relationship was apparent already in subjects without hypertension. Hypertensive subjects showed a quadratic relationship between SBP and hippocampal blood flow (β=-1.55, P=0.03): Perfusion was the highest in subjects with mid-range SBP around 125 mm Hg. Longitudinally, in hypertensive subjects perfusion increased with increased SBP at low baseline SBP but increased with decreased SBP at high baseline SBP. Cortical and hippocampal perfusion decrease with increasing SBP across the entire BP spectrum. However, in hypertension, there seems to be a window of mid-range SBP which maximizes perfusion.

Improving Hypertension Outcome Measurement in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

Zack, R., Okunade, O., Olson, E., Salt, M., Amodeo, C., Anchala, R., Berwanger, O., Campbell, N., Chia, Y. C., Damasceno, A., Phuong Do, T. N., Tamdja Dzudie, A., Fiuza, M., Mirza, F., Nitsch, D., Ogedegbe, O., Podpalov, V., Schiffrin, E. L., Vaz Carneiro, A., & Lamptey, P.

Publication year

2019

Journal title

Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979)

Volume

73

Issue

5

Page(s)

990-997
Abstract
High blood pressure is the leading modifiable risk factor for mortality, accounting for nearly 1 in 5 deaths worldwide and 1 in 11 in low-income countries. Hypertension control remains a challenge, especially in low-resource settings. One approach to improvement is the prioritization of patient-centered care. However, consensus on the outcomes that matter most to patients is lacking. We aimed to define a standard set of patient-centered outcomes for evaluating hypertension management in low- and middle-income countries. The International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement convened a Working Group of 18 experts and patients representing 15 countries. We used a modified Delphi process to reach consensus on a set of outcomes, case-mix variables, and a timeline to guide data collection. Literature reviews, patient interviews, a patient validation survey, and an open review by hypertension experts informed the set. The set contains 18 clinical and patient-reported outcomes that reflect patient priorities and evidence-based hypertension management and case-mix variables to allow comparisons between providers. The domains included are hypertension control, cardiovascular complications, health-related quality of life, financial burden of care, medication burden, satisfaction with care, health literacy, and health behaviors. We present a core list of outcomes for evaluating hypertension care. They account for the unique challenges healthcare providers and patients face in low- and middle-income countries, yet are relevant to all settings. We believe that it is a vital step toward international benchmarking in hypertension care and, ultimately, value-based hypertension management.

Measurement of Blood Pressure in Humans: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

Muntner, P., Shimbo, D., Carey, R. M., Charleston, J. B., Gaillard, T., Misra, S., Myers, M. G., Ogedegbe, O., Schwartz, J. E., Townsend, R. R., Urbina, E. M., Viera, A. J., White, W. B., & Wright, J. T.

Publication year

2019

Journal title

Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979)

Volume

73

Issue

5

Page(s)

e35-e66
Abstract
The accurate measurement of blood pressure (BP) is essential for the diagnosis and management of hypertension. This article provides an updated American Heart Association scientific statement on BP measurement in humans. In the office setting, many oscillometric devices have been validated that allow accurate BP measurement while reducing human errors associated with the auscultatory approach. Fully automated oscillometric devices capable of taking multiple readings even without an observer being present may provide a more accurate measurement of BP than auscultation. Studies have shown substantial differences in BP when measured outside versus in the office setting. Ambulatory BP monitoring is considered the reference standard for out-of-office BP assessment, with home BP monitoring being an alternative when ambulatory BP monitoring is not available or tolerated. Compared with their counterparts with sustained normotension (ie, nonhypertensive BP levels in and outside the office setting), it is unclear whether adults with white-coat hypertension (ie, hypertensive BP levels in the office but not outside the office) have increased cardiovascular disease risk, whereas those with masked hypertension (ie, hypertensive BP levels outside the office but not in the office) are at substantially increased risk. In addition, high nighttime BP on ambulatory BP monitoring is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Both oscillometric and auscultatory methods are considered acceptable for measuring BP in children and adolescents. Regardless of the method used to measure BP, initial and ongoing training of technicians and healthcare providers and the use of validated and calibrated devices are critical for obtaining accurate BP measurements.

Partnerships to Improve Shared Decision Making for Patients with Hypertension - Health Equity Implications

Langford, A. T., Williams, S. K., Applegate, M., Ogedegbe, O., & Braithwaite, R. S.

Publication year

2019

Journal title

Ethnicity & disease

Volume

29

Page(s)

97-102
Abstract
Shared decision making (SDM) has increasingly become appreciated as a method to enhance patient involvement in health care decisions, patient-provider communication, and patient-centered care. Compared with cancer, the literature on SDM for hypertension is more limited. This is notable because hypertension is the leading risk factor for cardiovascular disease and both conditions disproportionately affect certain subgroups of patients. However, SDM holds promise for improving health equity by better engaging patients in their health care. For example, many reasonable options exist for treating uncomplicated stage-1 hypertension. These options include medication and/or lifestyle changes such as healthy eating, physical activity, and weight management. Deciding on "the best" plan of action for hypertension management can be challenging because patients have different goals and preferences for treatment. As hypertension management may be considered a preference-sensitive decision, adherence to treatment plans may be greater if those plans are concordant with patient preferences. SDM can be implemented in a broad array of care contexts, from patient-provider dyads to interprofessional collaborations. In this article, we argue that SDM has the potential to advance health equity and improve clinical care. We also propose a process to evaluate whether SDM has occurred and suggest future directions for research.

Ambulatory blood pressure threshold for black Africans: More questions than answers

Adeoye, A. M., Tayo, B. O., Owolabi, M. O., Adebiyi, A. A., Lackland, D. T., Cooper, R., Ojo, A., & Ogedegbe, O.

Publication year

2018

Journal title

Journal of Clinical Hypertension

Cluster Randomized Clinical Trial of FAITH (Faith-Based Approaches in the Treatment of Hypertension) in Blacks

Schoenthaler, A. M., Lancaster, K., Chaplin, W., Butler, M., Forsyth, J., & Ogedegbe, O.

Publication year

2018

Journal title

Circulation. Cardiovascular quality and outcomes

Volume

11

Issue

10

Page(s)

e004691
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Therapeutic lifestyle change (TLC) is a recommended treatment for patients with hypertension, but its effectiveness in community-based settings remains untested, particularly in black churches-an influential institution for health promotion in black communities.METHODS AND RESULTS: The FAITH study (Faith-Based Approaches in the Treatment of Hypertension) evaluated the comparative effectiveness of a TLC intervention plus motivational interviewing (MINT) sessions versus health education (HE) alone, on blood pressure (BP) reduction among blacks with uncontrolled hypertension. Data were collected on 373 participants meeting eligibility criteria (self-identification as black, age ≥18 years, self-reported diagnosis of hypertension, and uncontrolled BP [BP ≥140/90 or ≥130/80 mm Hg with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease]) from 32 New York City churches. The MINT-TLC intervention plus motivational interviewing treatment comprised 11 weekly group sessions on TLC plus 3 MINT sessions delivered monthly by lay health advisors. The HE control group received 1 TLC session plus 10 sessions on health topics delivered by local experts. The outcomes were BP reduction at 6 months (primary) and BP control and BP reduction at 9 months (secondary). The sample mean age was 63 years; 76% women, with mean BP of 153/87 mm Hg. Using linear mixed-effects regression models, the MINT-TLC intervention plus motivational interviewing group had a significantly greater systolic BP reduction of 5.79 mm Hg compared with the HE group at 6 months ( P=0.029). The treatment effect on systolic BP persisted at 9 months but had reduced significance (5.21 mm Hg; P=0.068). The between-group differences in diastolic BP reduction (0.41 mm Hg) and mean arterial pressure (2.24 mm Hg) at 6 months were not significant. Although the MINT-TLC intervention plus motivational interviewing group had greater BP control than the HE group at 9 months, the difference was not statistically significant (57.0% versus 48.8%; odds ratio, 1.43; 95% CI, 0.90-2.28).CONCLUSIONS: A community-based lifestyle intervention delivered in churches led to significantly greater reduction in systolic BP in hypertensive blacks compared with HE alone.CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov . Unique identifier: NCT01065831.

Correlates of burnout in small independent primary care practices in an urban setting

Blechter, B., Jiang, N., Cleland, C., Berry, C., Ogedegbe, O., & Shelley, D.

Publication year

2018

Journal title

Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine

Volume

31

Issue

4

Page(s)

529-536
Abstract
Background: Little is known about the prevalence and correlates of burnout among providers who work in small independent primary care practices (<5 providers). Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis by using data collected from 235 providers practicing in 174 small independent primary care practices in New York City. Results: The rate of provider-reported burnout was 13.5%. Using bivariate logistic regression, we found higher adaptive reserve scores were associated with lower odds of burnout (odds ratio, 0.12; 95% CI, 0.02– 0.85; P .034). Conclusion: The burnout rate was relatively low among our sample of providers compared with previous surveys that focused primarily on larger practices. The independence and autonomy providers have in these small practices may provide some protection against symptoms of burnout. In addition, the relationship between adaptive reserve and lower rates of burnout point toward potential interventions for reducing burnout that include strengthening primary care practices’ learning and development capacity.

Culturally tailored, peer-based sleep health education and social support to increase obstructive sleep apnea assessment and treatment adherence among a community sample of blacks: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial 11 Medical and Health Sciences 1117 Public Health and Health Services 11 Medical and Health Sciences 1102 Cardiorespiratory Medicine and Haematology

Seixas, A. A., Trinh-Shevrin, C., Ravenell, J., Ogedegbe, O., Zizi, F., & Jean-Louis, G.

Publication year

2018

Journal title

Trials

Volume

19

Issue

1
Abstract
Background: Compared to whites, blacks are at increased risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) yet less likely to adhere to physician-recommended sleep assessment and treatment. Poor OSA health literacy and lack of social support to navigate the current healthcare system are two potential barriers to adequate OSA care. This study is designed to address these barriers by evaluating the effectiveness of a peer-based sleep health education program on adherence to OSA assessment and treatment among blacks at risk for OSA. Method/Design: In a two-arm, randomized controlled trial, we will ascertain the effectiveness of peer-based sleep health education and social support in increasing OSA evaluation and treatment rates among 398 blacks at low to high OSA risk. Participants at risk of OSA will receive quality controlled, culturally, and linguistically tailored peer education based on Motivational Enhancement principles over a period of 12 months. During this 12-month period, participants are encouraged to participate in a sleep home study to determine risk of OSA and, if found to be at risk, they are invited to undergo a diagnostic sleep assessment at a clinic. Participants who are diagnosed with OSA and who are prescribed continuous positive airway pressure treatment will be encouraged, through peer-based education, to adhere to recommended treatment. Recruitment for the project is ongoing. Discussion: The use of a culturally tailored sleep health education program, peer health educators trained in sleep health, and home-based sleep assessment are novel approaches in improving OSA assessment and treatment adherence in blacks who are significantly at risk for OSA. Empirical evidence from this trial will provide clinical and population level solutions on how to improve and increase assessment and treatment of OSA among blacks. Trial registration: NCT02427815. Registered on 20 April 2015. ClinicalTrials.gov title: Sleep Health Education and Social Support Among Blacks With OSA.

Developing a Tailored Website for Promoting Awareness about Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Among Blacks in Community-Based Settings

Robbins, R., Senathirajah, Y., Williams, N. J., Hutchinson, C., Rapoport, D. M., Allegrante, J. P., Cohall, A., Rogers, A., Ogedegbe, O., & Jean-Louis, G.

Publication year

2018

Journal title

Health Communication

Page(s)

1-9
Abstract
Blacks are at greater risk for lower sleep quality and higher risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) than other racial groups. In this study, we summarize the development of a tailored website including visuals, key messages, and video narratives, to promote awareness about sleep apnea among community-dwelling blacks. We utilized mixed methods, including in-depth interviews, usability-testing procedures, and brief surveys (n = 9, 55% female, 100% black, average age 38.5 years). Themes from the qualitative analysis illuminated varied knowledge regarding OSA symptoms and prevalent self-reported experience with sleep disturbance and OSA symptoms (e.g., snoring). On a scale from 1 (not at all) to 5 (very high), participants provided favorable ratings of website usefulness (mean = 4.9), user friendliness (mean = 4.9) and attractiveness (mean = 4.3). Our findings suggest although tailored health communication has potential for serving as a tool for advancing health equity, usability-testing of health materials is critical to ensure that culturally and linguistically tailored messages are acceptable and actionable in the intended population.

Evaluating different criteria for defining a complete ambulatory blood pressure monitoring recording: Data from the Jackson Heart Study

Bromfield, S. G., Booth, J. N., Loop, M. S., Schwartz, J. E., Seals, S. R., Thomas, S. J., Min, Y. I., Ogedegbe, O., Shimbo, D., & Muntner, P.

Publication year

2018

Journal title

Blood Pressure Monitoring

Volume

23

Issue

2

Page(s)

103-111
Abstract
Objective We determined differences in the prevalence of blood pressure (BP) phenotypes and the association of these phenotypes with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) for individuals who fulfilled and did not fulfill various criteria used for defining a complete ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) recording. Methods We analyzed data for 1141 participants from the Jackson Heart Study. Criteria evaluated included having greater than or equal to 80% of planned readings with more than or equal to one reading per hour (Spanish ABPM Registry criteria), more than or equal to 70% of planned readings with a minimum of 20 daytime and seven nighttime readings (2013 European Society of Hypertension criteria), greater than or equal to 14 daytime and greater than or equal to seven nighttime readings (2003 European Society of Hypertension criteria), more than or equal to 10 daytime and more than or equal to 5 nighttime readings (International Database of Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Relation to Cardiovascular Outcome criteria), and greater than or equal to 14 daytime readings (UK National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence criteria). Results Between 45.0% (Spanish ABPM Registry) and 91.8% (UK National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence) of the participants fulfilled the different criteria for a complete ABPM recording. Across the various criteria evaluated, 55.5-57.8% of participants had nocturnal hypertension and 62.8-66.8% had nondipping systolic BP. Among participants with clinic-measured systolic/diastolic BP of more than or equal to 140/90 mmHg, 22.9-26.5% had white-coat hypertension. The prevalence of daytime, 24-h, sustained, and masked hypertension differed by up to 2% for participants fulfilling each criterion. The association of BP phenotypes with LVH was similar for participants who fulfilled versus those who did not fulfill different criteria (each P>0.05). Conclusion Irrespective of the criteria used for defining a complete ABPM recording, the prevalence of BP phenotypes and their association with LVH were similar.

Health insurance coverage with or without a nurse-led task shifting strategy for hypertension control: A pragmatic cluster randomized trial in Ghana

Ogedegbe, O., Plange-Rhule, J., Gyamfi, J., Chaplin, W., Ntim, M., Apusiga, K., Iwelunmor, J., Awudzi, K. Y., Quakyi, K. N., Mogaverro, J., Khurshid, K., Tayo, B., & Cooper, R.

Publication year

2018

Journal title

PLoS Medicine

Volume

15

Issue

5
Abstract
Background: Poor access to care and physician shortage are major barriers to hypertension control in sub-Saharan Africa. Implementation of evidence-based systems-level strategies targeted at these barriers are lacking. We conducted a study to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of provision of health insurance coverage (HIC) alone versus a nurse-led task shifting strategy for hypertension control (TASSH) plus HIC on systolic blood pressure (SBP) reduction among patients with uncontrolled hypertension in Ghana. Methods and findings: Using a pragmatic cluster randomized trial, 32 community health centers within Ghana’s public healthcare system were randomly assigned to either HIC alone or TASSH + HIC. A total of 757 patients with uncontrolled hypertension were recruited between November 28, 2012, and June 11, 2014, and followed up to October 7, 2016. Both intervention groups received health insurance coverage plus scheduled nurse visits, while TASSH + HIC comprised cardiovascular risk assessment, lifestyle counseling, and initiation/titration of antihypertensive medications for 12 months, delivered by trained nurses within the healthcare system. The primary outcome was change in SBP from baseline to 12 months. Secondary outcomes included lifestyle behaviors and blood pressure control at 12 months and sustainability of SBP reduction at 24 months. Of the 757 patients (389 in the HIC group and 368 in the TASSH + HIC group), 85% had 12-month data available (60% women, mean BP 155.9/89.6 mm Hg). In intention-to-treat analyses adjusted for clustering, the TASSH + HIC group had a greater SBP reduction (−20.4 mm Hg; 95% CI −25.2 to −15.6) than the HIC group (−16.8 mm Hg; 95% CI −19.2 to −15.6), with a statistically significant between-group difference of −3.6 mm Hg (95% CI −6.1 to −0.5; p = 0.021). Blood pressure control improved significantly in both groups (55.2%, 95% CI 50.0% to 60.3%, for the TASSH + HIC group versus 49.9%, 95% CI 44.9% to 54.9%, for the HIC group), with a non-significant between-group difference of 5.2% (95% CI −1.8% to 12.4%; p = 0.29). Lifestyle behaviors did not change appreciably in either group. Twenty-one adverse events were reported (9 and 12 in the TASSH + HIC and HIC groups, respectively). The main study limitation is the lack of cost-effectiveness analysis to determine the additional costs and benefits, if any, of the TASSH + HIC group. Conclusions: Provision of health insurance coverage plus a nurse-led task shifting strategy was associated with a greater reduction in SBP than provision of health insurance coverage alone, among patients with uncontrolled hypertension in Ghana. Future scale-up of these systems-level strategies for hypertension control in sub-Saharan Africa requires a cost–benefit analysis.

Improving community stroke preparedness in the HHS (hip-hop stroke) randomized clinical trial

Williams, O., Quinn, E. L. H., Teresi, J., Eimicke, J. P., Kong, J., Ogedegbe, O., & Noble, J.

Publication year

2018

Journal title

Stroke

Volume

49

Issue

4

Page(s)

972-979
Abstract
Background and Purpose-Defciencies in stroke preparedness cause major delays to stroke thrombolysis, particularly among economically disadvantaged minorities. We evaluated the effectiveness of a stroke preparedness intervention delivered to preadolescent urban public school children on the stroke knowledge/preparedness of their parents. Methods-We recruited 3070 fourth through sixth graders and 1144 parents from 22 schools into a cluster randomized trial with schools randomized to the HHS (Hip-Hop Stroke) intervention or attentional control (nutrition classes). HHS is a 3-hour culturally tailored, theory-based, multimedia stroke literacy intervention targeting school children, which systematically empowers children to share stroke information with parents. Our main outcome measures were stroke knowledge/preparedness of children and parents using validated surrogates. Results-Among children, it was estimated that 1% (95% confdence interval [CI], 0%-1%) of controls and 2% (95% CI, 1%-4%; P=0.09) of the intervention group demonstrated optimal stroke preparedness (perfect scores on the knowledge/preparedness test) at baseline, increasing to 57% (95% CI, 44%-69%) immediately after the program in the intervention group compared with 1% (95% CI, 0%-1%; P<0.001) among controls. At 3-month follow-up, 24% (95% CI, 15%-33%) of the intervention group retained optimal preparedness, compared with 2% (95% CI, 0%-3%; P<0.001) of controls. Only 3% (95% CI, 2%-4%) of parents in the intervention group could identify all 4 letters of the stroke FAST (Facial droop, Arm weakness, Speech disturbance, Time to call 911) acronym at baseline, increasing to 20% at immediate posttest (95% CI, 16%-24%) and 17% at 3-month delayed post-test (95% CI, 13%-21%; P=0.0062), with no signifcant changes (3% identifcation) among controls. Four children, all in the intervention group, called 911 for real-life stroke symptoms, in 1 case overruling a parent's wait-and-see approach. Conclusions-HHS is an effective, intergenerational model for increasing stroke preparedness among economically disadvantaged minorities.

National patterns of physician management of sleep apnea and treatment among patients with hypertension

Robbins, R., Seixas, A., Jean-Louis, G., Parthasarathy, S., Rapoport, D. M., Ogedegbe, O., & Ladapo, J. A.

Publication year

2018

Journal title

PLoS One

Volume

13

Issue

5
Abstract
Study objectives Sleep apnea is associated with hypertension, and treatment may improve outcomes. We examine national burden of sleep apnea, rates of sleep apnea treatment, and whether racial/ethnic disparities exist among patients with hypertension. Methods Data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey/National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS/NHAMCS), 2005–2012, were analyzed (N = 417,950). We identified hypertension patient visits where sleep apnea diagnosis or complaint was recorded. Primary outcome measures were sleep study, medication, or behavioral therapy (diet, weight loss, or exercise counseling). We used multivariate logistic regression to examine treatment by demographic/clinical factors. Results Among patients with hypertension, sleep apnea was identified in 11.2-per-1,000 visits. Overall, patients with hypertension and a sleep disorder were referred for sleep study in 14.4% of visits, prescribed sleep medication in 11.2% of visits, and offered behavioral therapy in 34.8% of visits. Adjusted analyses show behavioral therapy more likely to be provided to obese patients than normal/overweight (OR = 4.96, 95%CI[2.93–8.38]), but less likely to be provided to smokers than nonsmokers (OR = 0.54, 95%CI[0.32–0.93]). Non-Hispanic blacks were less likely to receive medications than non-Hispanic whites (OR = 0.19, 95% CI [0.06–0.65]). Conclusions In the U.S., sleep apnea were observed in a small proportion of hypertension visits, a population at high-risk for the disorder. One explanation for the low prevalence of sleep apnea observed in this patient population at high risk for the disorder is under-diagnosis of sleep related breathing disorders. Behavioral therapy was underutilized, and non-Hispanic Blacks were less likely to receive medications than non-Hispanic Whites.

Quality of cardiovascular disease care in small urban practices

Shelley, D., Blechter, B., Siman, N., Jiang, N., Cleland, C., Ogedegbe, O., Williams, S., Wu, W., Rogers, E., & Berry, C.

Publication year

2018

Journal title

Annals of Family Medicine

Volume

16

Page(s)

S21-S28
Abstract
PURPOSE We wanted to describe small, independent primary care practices’ performance in meeting the Million Hearts ABCSs (aspirin use, blood pressure control, cholesterol management, and smoking screening and counseling), as well as on a composite measure that captured the extent to which multiple clinical targets are achieved for patients with a history of arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). We also explored relationships between practice characteristics and ABCS measures. METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional, bivariate analysis using baseline data from 134 practices in New York City. ABCS data were extracted from practices’ electronic health records and aggregated to the site level. Practice characteristics were obtained from surveys of clinicians and staff at each practice. RESULTS The proportion of at-risk patients meeting clinical goals for each of the ABCS measures was 73.0% for aspirin use, 69.6% for blood pressure, 66.7% for cholesterol management, and 74.2% screened for smoking and counseled. For patients with a history of ASCVD, only 49% were meeting all ABC (aspirin use, blood pressure control, cholesterol management) targets (ie, composite measure). Solo practices were more likely to meet clinical guidelines for aspirin (risk ratio [RR ] = 1.17, P = .007) and composite (RR = 1.29, P = .011) than practices with multiple clinicians. CONCLUSION Achieving targets for ABCS measures varied considerably across practices; however, small practices were meeting or exceeding Million Hearts goals (ie, 70% or greater). Practices were less likely to meet consistently clinical targets that apply to patients with a history of ASCVD risk factors. Greater emphasis is needed on providing support for small practices to address the complexity of managing patients with multiple risk factors for primary and secondary ASCVD.

Race, Ancestry, and Reporting in Medical Journals

Cooper, R. S., Nadkarni, G. N., & Ogedegbe, O.

Publication year

2018

Journal title

JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association

Page(s)

E1-E2

Task-shifting for cardiovascular risk factor management: Lessons from the Global Alliance for Chronic Diseases

Joshi, R., Thrift, A. G., Smith, C., Praveen, D., Vedanthan, R., Gyamfi, J., Schwalm, J. D., Limbani, F., Rubinstein, A., Parker, G., Ogedegbe, O., Plange-Rhule, J., Riddell, M. A., Thankappan, K. R., Thorogood, M., Goudge, J., & Yeates, K. E.

Publication year

2018

Journal title

BMJ Global Health

Volume

3
Abstract
Task-shifting to non-physician health workers (NPHWs) has been an effective model for managing infectious diseases and improving maternal and child health. There is inadequate evidence to show the effectiveness of NPHWs to manage cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). In 2012, the Global Alliance for Chronic Diseases funded eight studies which focused on task-shifting to NPHWs for the management of hypertension. We report the lessons learnt from the field. From each of the studies, we obtained information on the types of tasks shifted, the professional level from which the task was shifted, the training provided and the challenges faced. Additionally, we collected more granular data on 'lessons learnt ' throughout the implementation process and 'design to implementation' changes that emerged in each project. The tasks shifted to NPHWs included screening of individuals, referral to physicians for diagnosis and management, patient education for lifestyle improvement, follow-up and reminders for medication adherence and appointments. In four studies, tasks were shifted from physicians to NPHWs and in four studies tasks were shared between two different levels of NPHWs. Training programmes ranged between 3 and 7 days with regular refresher training. Two studies used clinical decision support tools and mobile health components. Challenges faced included system level barriers such as inability to prescribe medicines, varying skill sets of NPHWs, high workload and staff turnover. With the acute shortage of the health workforce in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs), achieving better health outcomes for the prevention and control of CVD is a major challenge. Task-shifting or sharing provides a practical model for the management of CVD in LMICs.

Telephone-based mindfulness training to reduce stress in women with myocardial infarction: Rationale and design of a multicenter randomized controlled trial

Spruill, T. M., Reynolds, H. R., Vaughan Dickson, V., Shallcross, A. J., Visvanathan, P. D., Park, C., Kalinowski, J., Zhong, H., Berger, J. S., Hochman, J. S., Fishman, G. I., & Ogedegbe, O.

Publication year

2018

Journal title

American Heart Journal

Volume

202

Page(s)

61-67
Abstract
Background: Elevated stress is associated with adverse cardiovascular disease outcomes and accounts in part for the poorer recovery experienced by women compared with men after myocardial infarction (MI). Psychosocial interventions improve outcomes overall but are less effective for women than for men with MI, suggesting the need for different approaches. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is an evidence-based intervention that targets key psychosocial vulnerabilities in women including rumination (i.e., repetitive negative thinking) and low social support. This article describes the rationale and design of a multicenter randomized controlled trial to test the effects of telephone-delivered MBCT (MBCT-T) in women with MI. Methods: We plan to randomize 144 women reporting elevated perceived stress at least two months after MI to MBCT-T or enhanced usual care (EUC), which each involve eight weekly telephone sessions. Perceived stress and a set of patient-centered health outcomes and potential mediators will be assessed before and after the 8-week telephone programs and at 6-month follow-up. We will test the hypothesis that MBCT-T will be associated with greater 6-month improvements in perceived stress (primary outcome), disease-specific health status, quality of life, depression and anxiety symptoms, and actigraphy-based sleep quality (secondary outcomes) compared with EUC. Changes in mindfulness, rumination and perceived social support will be evaluated as potential mediators in exploratory analyses. Conclusions: If found to be effective, this innovative, scalable intervention may be a promising secondary prevention strategy for women with MI experiencing elevated perceived stress.

Transferring Stroke Knowledge from Children to Parents: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Community Stroke Educational Programs

Ilunga Tshiswaka, D., Sikes, L. E., Iwelunmor, J., Ogedegbe, O., & Williams, O.

Publication year

2018

Journal title

Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases
Abstract
Background: The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis on child-to-parent communication of stroke information (Child-Mediated Stroke Communication, CMSC) is to provide the highest levels of evidence supporting the role of this approach in community education. Methods: Databases such as PubMed, Google Scholar, PsycINFO, Web of Science, MEDLINE, and CINHAL were searched to gather information on CMSC followed by a meta-analysis. The eligibility criteria were as follows: (a) children aged 9-15 years and parents, (b) randomized or nonrandomized trials, and (c) outcome variables that included the proportions of parents answering the pretest and post-test on stroke knowledge regarding risk factors, symptoms, and what to do in the event of stroke. Results: Of the 1668 retrieved studies, 9 articles were included. Meta-analytical findings yielded that the proportions of correct answers for stroke symptoms and its risk factors among parents were 0.686 (95% CI: 0.594-0.777) at baseline and increased to 0.847 (95% CI: 0.808-0.886) at immediate post-test and 0.845 (95% CI: 0.804-0.886) delayed post-test. The proportions of correct answers for behavioral intent to call 911 when witnessing stroke was 0.712 (95% CI: 0.578-0.846) at baseline, rising to 0.860 (95% CI: 0.767-0.953) at immediate post-test, and 0.846 (95% CI: 0.688-1.004) at delayed post-test. Conclusions: CMSC is effective for educating families. More work is needed to increase the use of validated stroke literacy instruments and behavioral theory, and to reduce parental attrition in research studies.

Understanding the causes of breast cancer treatment delays at a teaching hospital in Ghana

Sanuade, O. A., Ayettey, H., Hewlett, S., Dedey, F., Wu, L., Akingbola, T., Ogedegbe, O., & De-Graft Aikins, A.

Publication year

2018

Journal title

Journal of Health Psychology
Abstract
Poor outcomes for breast cancer in Ghana have been attributed to late presentation of symptoms at biomedical facilities. This study explored factors accounting for delays in initiation of breast cancer treatment at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital in Accra. Focus group discussions were conducted with 20 women with breast cancer. A theory-driven thematic analysis identified three multilevel factors influencing treatment seeking delays: (1) patient (e.g. misinterpretation of symptoms, fear), (2) healthcare provider (e.g. negative attitudes) and (3) health systems (e.g. shortage of medicines). Addressing treatment delays will require multilevel interventions, including culturally congruent education, psychosocial counselling/support and strengthening health systems.

A content analysis of outdoor non-alcoholic beverage advertisements in Ghana

Bragg, M. A., Hardoby, T., Pandit, N. G., Raji, Y. R., & Ogedegbe, G.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

BMJ Open

Volume

7

Issue

5
Abstract
Objectives This was a two-part descriptive study designed to (1) assess the marketing themes and sugar content of beverages promoted in outdoor advertisements (ads) within a portion of Accra, Ghana and (2) quantify the types of ads that appeared along the Accra-Cape Coast Highway. Setting A 4.7 km 2 area of Accra, Ghana and a 151 km region along the highway represented the target areas for collecting photos of outdoor beverage ads. Primary and secondary outcome measures Number and types of beverage ads, sugar content of beverage products featured in ads and marketing themes used in ads. Design Two researchers photographed outdoor beverage ads in a 4.7 km 2 area of Accra and used content analysis to assess marketing themes of ads, including the portrayal of children, local culture, music, sports and health. Researchers also recorded the number and type of ads along a 151 km stretch of the Accra-Cape Coast Highway. Researchers assessed the added sugar content to determine which beverages were sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). Results Seventy-seven photographed ads were analysed. Seventy-three per cent (72.7%) of ads featured SSBs, and Coca-Cola accounted for 59.7% of ads. Sixty-five per cent (64.9%) of all ads featured sodas, while 35.1% advertised energy drinks, bottled or canned juice drinks and coffee-based, milk-based and water-based beverages. Thirteen per cent (13%) of ads featured children and 5.2% were located near schools or playgrounds. Nine per cent (9.1%) of ads contained a reference to health and 7.8% contained a reference to fitness/strength/sport. Along the Accra-Cape Coast Highway, Coca-Cola accounted for 60% of branded ads. Conclusion This study demonstrates the frequency of outdoor SSB ads within a 4.7 km 2 area of Accra, Ghana. Coca-Cola was featured in the majority of ads, and the child-targeted nature of some ads indicates a need to expand the Children's Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative pledge to reduce child-targeted marketing on a global scale.

Addressing the social needs of hypertensive patients the role of patient-provider communication as a predictor of medication adherence

Schoenthaler, A., Knafl, G. J., Fiscella, K., & Ogedegbe, O.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes

Volume

10

Issue

9
Abstract
Background-Poor medication adherence is a pervasive problem in patients with hypertension. Despite research documenting an association between patient-provider communication and medication adherence, there are no empirical data on how the informational and relational aspects of communication affect patient's actual medication-Taking behaviors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of patient-provider communication on medication adherence among a sample of primary care providers and their black and white hypertensive patients. Methods and Results-Cohort study included 92 hypertensive patients and 27 providers in 3 safety-net primary care practices in New York City. Patient-provider encounters were audiotaped at baseline and coded using the Medical Interaction Process System. Medication adherence data were collected continuously during the 3-month study with an electronic monitoring device. The majority of patients were black, 58% women, and most were seeing the same provider for at least 1 year. Approximately half of providers were white (56%), 67% women, and have been in practice for an average of 5.8 years. Fifty-eight percent of patients exhibited poor adherence to prescribed antihypertensive medications. Three categories of patient-provider communication predicted poor medication adherence: lower patient centeredness (odds ratio: 3.08; 95% confidence interval: 1.04-9.12), less discussion about patients' sociodemographic circumstances (living situation, relationship with partner; odds ratio: 6.03; 95% confidence interval: 2.15-17), and about their antihypertensive medications (odds ratio: 6.48; 95% confidence interval: 1.83-23.0). The effect of having less discussion about patients' sociodemographic circumstances on medication adherence was heightened in black patients (odds ratio: 8.01; 95% confidence interval: 2.80-22.9). Conclusions-The odds of poor medication adherence are greater when patient-provider interactions are low in patient centeredness and do not address patients' sociodemographic circumstances or their medication regimen.

Adherence to antihypertensive medications and associations with blood pressure among African Americans with hypertension in the Jackson Heart Study

Butler, M. J., Tanner, R. M., Muntner, P., Shimbo, D., Bress, A. P., Shallcross, A. J., Sims, M., Ogedegbe, O., & Spruill, T. M.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Journal of the American Society of Hypertension

Volume

11

Issue

9

Page(s)

581-588.e5
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to test the association between a self-report measure of 24-hour adherence to antihypertensive medication and blood pressure (BP) among African Americans. The primary analysis included 3558 Jackson Heart Study participants taking antihypertensive medication who had adherence data for at least one study examination. Nonadherence was defined by self-report of not taking one or more prescribed antihypertensive medications, identified during pill bottle review, in the past 24 hours. Nonadherence and clinic BP were assessed at Exam 1 (2000–2004), Exam 2 (2005–2008), and Exam 3 (2009–2013). Associations of nonadherence with clinic BP and uncontrolled BP (systolic BP ≥ 140 mm Hg or diastolic BP ≥ 90 mm Hg) were evaluated using unadjusted and adjusted linear and Poisson repeated measures regression models. The prevalence of nonadherence to antihypertensive medications was 25.4% at Exam 1, 28.7% at Exam 2, and 28.5% at Exam 3. Nonadherence was associated with higher systolic BP (3.38 mm Hg) and diastolic BP (1.47 mm Hg) in fully adjusted repeated measures analysis. Nonadherence was also associated with uncontrolled BP (prevalence ratio = 1.26; 95% confidence interval = 1.16–1.37). This new self-report measure may be useful for identifying nonadherence to antihypertensive medication in future epidemiologic studies.

Blood pressure control and mortality in US- and foreign-born blacks in New York City

Gyamfi, J., Butler, M., Williams, S. K., Agyemang, C., Gyamfi, L., Seixas, A., Zinsou, G. M., Bangalore, S., Shah, N. R., & Ogedegbe, O.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Journal of Clinical Hypertension
Abstract
This retrospective cohort study compared blood pressure (BP) control (BP <140/90 mm Hg) and all-cause mortality between US- and foreign-born blacks. We used data from a clinical data warehouse of 41 868 patients with hypertension who received care in a New York City public healthcare system between 2004 and 2009, defining BP control as the last recorded BP measurement and mean BP control. Poisson regression demonstrated that Caribbean-born blacks had lower BP control for the last BP measurement compared with US- and West African-born blacks, respectively (49% vs 54% and 57%; P<.001). This pattern was similar for mean BP control. Caribbean- and West African-born blacks showed reduced hazard ratios of mortality (0.46 [95% CI, 0.42-0.50] and 0.28 [95% CI, 0.18-0.41], respectively) compared with US-born blacks, even after adjustment for BP. BP control rates and mortality were heterogeneous in this sample. Caribbean-born blacks showed worse control than US-born blacks. However, US-born blacks experienced increased hazard of mortality. This suggests the need to account for the variations within blacks in hypertension management.

Cardiovascular Health and Incident Hypertension in Blacks: JHS (The Jackson Heart Study)

Booth, J. N., Abdalla, M., Tanner, R. M., Diaz, K. M., Bromfield, S. G., Tajeu, G. S., Correa, A., Sims, M., Ogedegbe, G., Bress, A. P., Spruill, T. M., Shimbo, D., & Muntner, P.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Hypertension
Abstract
Several modifiable health behaviors and health factors that comprise the Life’s Simple 7—a cardiovascular health metric—have been associated with hypertension risk. We determined the association between cardiovascular health and incident hypertension in JHS (the Jackson Heart Study)—a cohort of blacks. We analyzed participants without hypertension or cardiovascular disease at baseline (2000–2004) who attended ≥1 follow-up visit in 2005 to 2008 or 2009 to 2012 (n=1878). Body mass index, physical activity, diet, cigarette smoking, blood pressure (BP), total cholesterol, and fasting glucose were assessed at baseline and categorized as ideal, intermediate, or poor using the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 definitions. Incident hypertension was defined at the first visit wherein a participant had systolic BP ≥140 mm Hg, diastolic BP ≥90 mm Hg, or self-reported taking antihypertensive medication. The percentage of participants with ≤1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 ideal Life’s Simple 7 components was 6.5%, 22.4%, 34.4%, 25.2%, 10.0%, and 1.4%, respectively. No participants had 7 ideal components. During follow-up (median, 8.0 years), 944 (50.3%) participants developed hypertension, including 81.3% with ≤1 and 11.1% with 6 ideal components. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) for incident hypertension comparing participants with 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 versus ≤1 ideal component were 0.80 (0.61–1.03), 0.58 (0.45–0.74), 0.30 (0.23–0.40), 0.26 (0.18–0.37), and 0.10 (0.03–0.31), respectively (Ptrend <0.001). This association was present among participants with baseline systolic BP <120 mm Hg and diastolic BP <80 mm Hg and separately systolic BP 120 to 139 mm Hg or diastolic BP 80 to 89 mm Hg. Blacks with better cardiovascular health have lower hypertension risk.