Olugbenga Ogedegbe

Olugbenga Ogedegbe

Olugbenga Ogedegbe

Professor

Professional overview

Gbenga Ogedegbe, a physician, is Professor of Population Health & Medicine, Chief Division of Health & Behavior and Director Center for Healthful Behavior Change in the Department of Population Health at the School of Medicine. Gbenga is a leading expert on health disparities research; his work focuses on the implementation of evidence-based interventions for cardiovascular risk reduction in minority populations. He is Principal Investigator on numerous NIH projects, and has expanded his work globally to Sub-Saharan Africa where he is funded by the NIH to strengthen research capacity and reduce the burden of noncommunicable diseases. He has co-authored over 250 publications and his work has been recognized by receipt of several research and mentoring awards including the prestigious John M. Eisenberg Excellence in Mentorship Award from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the Daniel Savage Science Award. He has served on numerous scientific panels including the NIH, CDC, World Health Organization, and the European Union Research Council. Prior to joining NYU, he was faculty at Cornell Weill Medical School and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

Education

MPH from Columbia University, 1999
Residency, Montefiore Medical Center, Internal Medicine, 1998
MD from Donetsk University, 1988

Publications

A content analysis of outdoor non-alcoholic beverage advertisements in Ghana

Bragg, M., Hardoby, T., Pandit, N.G., Raji, Y.R., & Ogedegbe, O.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

BMJ Open

Volume

7
10.1136/bmjopen-2016-012313
Abstract

Objectives This was a two-part descriptive study designed to (1) assess the marketing themes and sugar content of beverages promoted in outdoor advertisements (ads) within a portion of Accra, Ghana and (2) quantify the types of ads that appeared along the Accra-Cape Coast Highway. Setting A 4.7 km 2 area of Accra, Ghana and a 151 km region along the highway represented the target areas for collecting photos of outdoor beverage ads. Primary and secondary outcome measures Number and types of beverage ads, sugar content of beverage products featured in ads and marketing themes used in ads. Design Two researchers photographed outdoor beverage ads in a 4.7 km 2 area of Accra and used content analysis to assess marketing themes of ads, including the portrayal of children, local culture, music, sports and health. Researchers also recorded the number and type of ads along a 151 km stretch of the Accra-Cape Coast Highway. Researchers assessed the added sugar content to determine which beverages were sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). Results Seventy-seven photographed ads were analysed. Seventy-three per cent (72.7%) of ads featured SSBs, and Coca-Cola accounted for 59.7% of ads. Sixty-five per cent (64.9%) of all ads featured sodas, while 35.1% advertised energy drinks, bottled or canned juice drinks and coffee-based, milk-based and water-based beverages. Thirteen per cent (13%) of ads featured children and 5.2% were located near schools or playgrounds. Nine per cent (9.1%) of ads contained a reference to health and 7.8% contained a reference to fitness/strength/sport. Along the Accra-Cape Coast Highway, Coca-Cola accounted for 60% of branded ads. Conclusion This study demonstrates the frequency of outdoor SSB ads within a 4.7 km 2 area of Accra, Ghana. Coca-Cola was featured in the majority of ads, and the child-targeted nature of some ads indicates a need to expand the Children's Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative pledge to reduce child-targeted marketing on a global scale.

Addressing the social needs of hypertensive patients the role of patient-provider communication as a predictor of medication adherence

Schoenthaler, A., Knafl, G.J., Fiscella, K., & Ogedegbe, O.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes

Volume

10
10.1161/CIRCOUTCOMES.117.003659
Abstract

Background-Poor medication adherence is a pervasive problem in patients with hypertension. Despite research documenting an association between patient-provider communication and medication adherence, there are no empirical data on how the informational and relational aspects of communication affect patient's actual medication-Taking behaviors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of patient-provider communication on medication adherence among a sample of primary care providers and their black and white hypertensive patients. Methods and Results-Cohort study included 92 hypertensive patients and 27 providers in 3 safety-net primary care practices in New York City. Patient-provider encounters were audiotaped at baseline and coded using the Medical Interaction Process System. Medication adherence data were collected continuously during the 3-month study with an electronic monitoring device. The majority of patients were black, 58% women, and most were seeing the same provider for at least 1 year. Approximately half of providers were white (56%), 67% women, and have been in practice for an average of 5.8 years. Fifty-eight percent of patients exhibited poor adherence to prescribed antihypertensive medications. Three categories of patient-provider communication predicted poor medication adherence: lower patient centeredness (odds ratio: 3.08; 95% confidence interval: 1.04-9.12), less discussion about patients' sociodemographic circumstances (living situation, relationship with partner; odds ratio: 6.03; 95% confidence interval: 2.15-17), and about their antihypertensive medications (odds ratio: 6.48; 95% confidence interval: 1.83-23.0). The effect of having less discussion about patients' sociodemographic circumstances on medication adherence was heightened in black patients (odds ratio: 8.01; 95% confidence interval: 2.80-22.9). Conclusions-The odds of poor medication adherence are greater when patient-provider interactions are low in patient centeredness and do not address patients' sociodemographic circumstances or their medication regimen.

Adherence to antihypertensive medications and associations with blood pressure among African Americans with hypertension in the Jackson Heart Study

Butler, M.J., Tanner, R.M., Muntner, P., Shimbo, D., Bress, A.P., Shallcross, A.J., … Spruill, T.M.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Journal of the American Society of Hypertension

Volume

11

Page(s)

581-588.e5
10.1016/j.jash.2017.06.011
Abstract

The purpose of this study was to test the association between a self-report measure of 24-hour adherence to antihypertensive medication and blood pressure (BP) among African Americans. The primary analysis included 3558 Jackson Heart Study participants taking antihypertensive medication who had adherence data for at least one study examination. Nonadherence was defined by self-report of not taking one or more prescribed antihypertensive medications, identified during pill bottle review, in the past 24 hours. Nonadherence and clinic BP were assessed at Exam 1 (2000–2004), Exam 2 (2005–2008), and Exam 3 (2009–2013). Associations of nonadherence with clinic BP and uncontrolled BP (systolic BP ≥ 140 mm Hg or diastolic BP ≥ 90 mm Hg) were evaluated using unadjusted and adjusted linear and Poisson repeated measures regression models. The prevalence of nonadherence to antihypertensive medications was 25.4% at Exam 1, 28.7% at Exam 2, and 28.5% at Exam 3. Nonadherence was associated with higher systolic BP (3.38 mm Hg) and diastolic BP (1.47 mm Hg) in fully adjusted repeated measures analysis. Nonadherence was also associated with uncontrolled BP (prevalence ratio = 1.26; 95% confidence interval = 1.16–1.37). This new self-report measure may be useful for identifying nonadherence to antihypertensive medication in future epidemiologic studies.

Blood pressure control and mortality in US- and foreign-born blacks in New York City

Gyamfi, J., Butler, M., Williams, S.K., Agyemang, C., Gyamfi, L., Seixas, A., … Ogedegbe, O.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Journal of Clinical Hypertension
10.1111/jch.13045
Abstract

This retrospective cohort study compared blood pressure (BP) control (BP <140/90 mm Hg) and all-cause mortality between US- and foreign-born blacks. We used data from a clinical data warehouse of 41 868 patients with hypertension who received care in a New York City public healthcare system between 2004 and 2009, defining BP control as the last recorded BP measurement and mean BP control. Poisson regression demonstrated that Caribbean-born blacks had lower BP control for the last BP measurement compared with US- and West African-born blacks, respectively (49% vs 54% and 57%; P<.001). This pattern was similar for mean BP control. Caribbean- and West African-born blacks showed reduced hazard ratios of mortality (0.46 [95% CI, 0.42-0.50] and 0.28 [95% CI, 0.18-0.41], respectively) compared with US-born blacks, even after adjustment for BP. BP control rates and mortality were heterogeneous in this sample. Caribbean-born blacks showed worse control than US-born blacks. However, US-born blacks experienced increased hazard of mortality. This suggests the need to account for the variations within blacks in hypertension management.

Cardiovascular Health and Incident Hypertension in Blacks: JHS (The Jackson Heart Study)

Booth, J.N., Abdalla, M., Tanner, R.M., Diaz, K.M., Bromfield, S.G., Tajeu, G.S., … Muntner, P.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Hypertension
10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.117.09278
Abstract

Several modifiable health behaviors and health factors that comprise the Life’s Simple 7—a cardiovascular health metric—have been associated with hypertension risk. We determined the association between cardiovascular health and incident hypertension in JHS (the Jackson Heart Study)—a cohort of blacks. We analyzed participants without hypertension or cardiovascular disease at baseline (2000–2004) who attended ≥1 follow-up visit in 2005 to 2008 or 2009 to 2012 (n=1878). Body mass index, physical activity, diet, cigarette smoking, blood pressure (BP), total cholesterol, and fasting glucose were assessed at baseline and categorized as ideal, intermediate, or poor using the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 definitions. Incident hypertension was defined at the first visit wherein a participant had systolic BP ≥140 mm Hg, diastolic BP ≥90 mm Hg, or self-reported taking antihypertensive medication. The percentage of participants with ≤1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 ideal Life’s Simple 7 components was 6.5%, 22.4%, 34.4%, 25.2%, 10.0%, and 1.4%, respectively. No participants had 7 ideal components. During follow-up (median, 8.0 years), 944 (50.3%) participants developed hypertension, including 81.3% with ≤1 and 11.1% with 6 ideal components. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) for incident hypertension comparing participants with 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 versus ≤1 ideal component were 0.80 (0.61–1.03), 0.58 (0.45–0.74), 0.30 (0.23–0.40), 0.26 (0.18–0.37), and 0.10 (0.03–0.31), respectively (Ptrend <0.001). This association was present among participants with baseline systolic BP <120 mm Hg and diastolic BP <80 mm Hg and separately systolic BP 120 to 139 mm Hg or diastolic BP 80 to 89 mm Hg. Blacks with better cardiovascular health have lower hypertension risk.

Developing consensus measures for global programs: Lessons from the Global Alliance for Chronic Diseases Hypertension research program

Riddell, M.A., Edwards, N., Thompson, S.R., Bernabe-Ortiz, A., Praveen, D., Johnson, C., …

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Globalization and Health

Volume

13
10.1186/s12992-017-0242-8
Abstract

Background: The imperative to improve global health has prompted transnational research partnerships to investigate common health issues on a larger scale. The Global Alliance for Chronic Diseases (GACD) is an alliance of national research funding agencies. To enhance research funded by GACD members, this study aimed to standardise data collection methods across the 15 GACD hypertension research teams and evaluate the uptake of these standardised measurements. Furthermore we describe concerns and difficulties associated with the data harmonisation process highlighted and debated during annual meetings of the GACD funded investigators. With these concerns and issues in mind, a working group comprising representatives from the 15 studies iteratively identified and proposed a set of common measures for inclusion in each of the teams' data collection plans. One year later all teams were asked which consensus measures had been implemented. Results: Important issues were identified during the data harmonisation process relating to data ownership, sharing methodologies and ethical concerns. Measures were assessed across eight domains; demographic; dietary; clinical and anthropometric; medical history; hypertension knowledge; physical activity; behavioural (smoking and alcohol); and biochemical domains. Identifying validated measures relevant across a variety of settings presented some difficulties. The resulting GACD hypertension data dictionary comprises 67 consensus measures. Of the 14 responding teams, only two teams were including more than 50 consensus variables, five teams were including between 25 and 50 consensus variables and four teams were including between 6 and 24 consensus variables, one team did not provide details of the variables collected and two teams did not include any of the consensus variables as the project had already commenced or the measures were not relevant to their study. Conclusions: Deriving consensus measures across diverse research projects and contexts was challenging. The major barrier to their implementation was related to the time taken to develop and present these measures. Inclusion of consensus measures into future funding announcements would facilitate researchers integrating these measures within application protocols. We suggest that adoption of consensus measures developed here, across the field of hypertension, would help advance the science in this area, allowing for more comparable data sets and generalizable inferences.

Exploring stakeholders' perceptions of a task-shifting strategy for hypertension control in Ghana: A qualitative study

Iwelunmor, J., Gyamfi, J., Plange-Rhule, J., Blackstone, S., Quakyi, N.K., Ntim, M., … Ogedegbe, O.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

BMC Public Health

Volume

17
10.1186/s12889-017-4127-9
Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to explore stakeholders' perception of an on-going evidence-based task-shifting strategy for hypertension (TASSH) in 32 community health centers and district hospitals in Ghana. Methods: Using focus group discussions and in-depth interviews, qualitative data were obtained from 81 key stakeholders including patients, nurses, and site directors of participating community health centers involved in the TASSH trial. Qualitative data were analyzed using open and axial coding techniques. Results: Analysis of the qualitative data revealed three themes that illustrate stakeholders' perceptions of the ongoing task-shifting strategy for blood pressure control in Ghana and they include: 1) awareness and understanding of the TASSH program; 2) reasons for participation and non-participation in TASSH; and 3) the benefit and drawbacks to the TASSH program. Conclusion: The findings support evidence that successful implementation of any task-shifting strategy must focus not only on individual patient characteristics, but also consider the role contextual factors such as organizational and leadership factors play. The findings also demonstrate the importance of understanding stakeholder's perceptions of evidence-based task-shifting interventions for hypertension control as it may ultimately influence the sustainable uptake of these interventions into "real world" settings.

Innovative Approaches to Hypertension Control in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

Vedanthan, R., Bernabe-Ortiz, A., Herasme, O.I., Joshi, R., Lopez-Jaramillo, P., Thrift, A.G., … Fuster, V.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Cardiology Clinics

Volume

35

Page(s)

99-115
10.1016/j.ccl.2016.08.010
Abstract

Elevated blood pressure, a major risk factor for ischemic heart disease, heart failure, and stroke, is the leading global risk for mortality. Treatment and control rates are very low in low- and middle-income countries. There is an urgent need to address this problem. The Global Alliance for Chronic Diseases sponsored research projects focus on controlling hypertension, including community engagement, salt reduction, salt substitution, task redistribution, mHealth, and fixed-dose combination therapies. This paper reviews the rationale for each approach and summarizes the experience of some of the research teams. The studies demonstrate innovative and practical methods for improving hypertension control.

Mentored training to increase diversity among faculty in the biomedical sciences: The NHL BI Summer Institute Programs to Increase Diversity (SI PID ) and the Programs to Increase Diversity among Individuals Engaged in Health-related Research (PRIDE )

Rice, T.K., Jeffe, D.B., Boyington, J.E., Jobe, J.B., Dávila-Román, V.G., Gonzalez, J.E., … Boutjdir, M.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Ethnicity and Disease

Volume

27

Page(s)

249-256
10.18865/ed.27.3.249
Abstract

Objective: To report baseline characteristics of junior-level faculty participants in the Summer Institute Programs to Increase Diversity (SIPID) and the Programs to Increase Diversity among individuals engaged in Health-Related Research (PRIDE), which aim to facilitate participants' career development as independent investigators in heart, lung, blood, and sleep research. Design and Setting: Junior faculty from groups underrepresented in the biomedicalresearch workforce attended two, 2-3 week, annual summer research-education programs at one of six sites. Programs provided didactic and/or laboratory courses, workshops to develop research, writing and career-development skills, as well as a mentoring component, with regular contact maintained via phone, email and webinar conferences. Between summer institutes, trainees participated in a short mid-year meeting and an annual scientific meeting. Participants were surveyed during and after SIPID/PRIDE to evaluate program components. Participants: Junior faculty from underrepresented populations across the United States and Puerto Rico participated in one of three SIPID (2007-2010) or six PRIDE programs (2011-2014). Results: Of 204 SIPID/PRIDE participants, 68% were female; 67% African American and 27% Hispanic/Latino; at enrollment, 75% were assistant professors and 15% instructors, with most (96%) on non-tenure track. Fifty-eight percent had research doctorates (PhD, ScD) and 42% had medical (MD, DO) degrees. Mentees' feedback about the program indicated skills development (eg, manuscript and grant writing), access to networking, and mentoring were the most beneficial elements of SIPID and PRIDE programs. Grant awards shifted from primarily mentored research mechanisms to primarily independent investigator awards after training. Conclusions: Mentees reported their career development benefited from SIPID and PRIDE participation.

Metabolic syndrome and masked hypertension among African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study

Colantonio, L.D., Anstey, D.E., Carson, A.P., Ogedegbe, O., Abdalla, M., Sims, M., … Muntner, P.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Journal of Clinical Hypertension

Volume

19

Page(s)

592-600
10.1111/jch.12974
Abstract

The metabolic syndrome is associated with higher ambulatory blood pressure. The authors studied the association of metabolic syndrome and masked hypertension (MHT) among African Americans with clinic-measured systolic/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP) <140/90 mm Hg in the Jackson Heart Study. MHT was defined as daytime, nighttime, or 24-hour hypertension on ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Among 359 participants not taking antihypertensive medication, the metabolic syndrome was associated with MHT (prevalence ratio, 1.38; 95% confidence interval, 1.10–1.74]). When metabolic syndrome components (clinic SBP/DBP 130–139/85–89 mm Hg, abdominal obesity, impaired glucose, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high triglycerides) were analyzed separately, only clinic SBP/DBP 130–139/85–89 mm Hg was associated with MHT (prevalence ratio, 1.90; 95% confidence interval, 1.56–2.32]). The metabolic syndrome was not associated with MHT among participants not taking antihypertensive medication with SBP/DBP 130–139/85–89 and <130/85 mm Hg, separately, or among participants taking antihypertensive medication (n=393). Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring screening for MHT among African Americans should be considered based on clinic BP, not metabolic syndrome.

Modifiable risk factors versus age on developing high predicted cardiovascular disease risk in blacks

Bress, A.P., Colantonio, L.D., Booth, J.N., Spruill, T.M., Ravenell, J., Butler, M., … Muntner, P.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Journal of the American Heart Association

Volume

6
10.1161/JAHA.116.005054
Abstract

Background-Clinical guidelines recommend using predicted atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk to inform treatment decisions. The objective was to compare the contribution of changes in modifiable risk factors versus aging to the development of high 10-year predicted ASCVD risk. Methods and Results-A prospective follow-up was done of the Jackson Heart Study, an exclusively black cohort at visit 1 (2000-2004) and visit 3 (2009-2012). Analyses included 1115 black participants without high 10-year predicted ASCVD risk (<7.5%), hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or ASCVD at visit 1. We used the Pooled Cohort equations to calculate the incidence of high (≥7.5%) 10-year predicted ASCVD risk at visit 3. We recalculated the percentage with high 10-year predicted ASCVD risk at visit 3 assuming each risk factor (age, systolic blood pressure, antihypertensive medication use, diabetes mellitus, smoking, total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol), one at a time, did not change from visit 1. The mean age at visit 1 was 45.2±9.5 years. Overall, 30.9% (95% CI 28.3-33.4%) of participants developed high 10-year predicted ASCVD risk. Aging accounted for 59.7% (95% CI 54.2-65.1%) of the development of high 10-year predicted ASCVD risk compared with 32.8% (95% CI 27.0-38.2%) for increases in systolic blood pressure or antihypertensive medication initiation and 12.8% (95% CI 9.6-16.5%) for incident diabetes mellitus. Among participants <50 years, the contribution of increases in systolic blood pressure or antihypertensive medication initiation was similar to aging. Conclusions-Increases in systolic blood pressure and antihypertensive medication initiation are major contributors to the development of high 10-year predicted ASCVD risk in blacks, particularly among younger adults.

Neighborhood walk score and selected Cardiometabolic factors in the French RECORD cohort study

Méline, J., Chaix, B., Pannier, B., Ogedegbe, O., Trasande, L., Athens, J., & Duncan, D.T.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

BMC Public Health

Volume

17
10.1186/s12889-017-4962-8
Abstract

Background: Walkable neighborhoods are purported to impact a range of cardiometabolic outcomes through increased walking, but there is limited research that examines multiple cardiometabolic outcomes. Additionally, few Walk Score (a novel measure of neighborhood walkability) studies have been conducted in a European context. We evaluated associations between neighborhood Walk Score and selected cardiometabolic outcomes, including obesity, hypertension and heart rate, among adults in the Paris metropolitan area. Methods and results: We used data from the second wave of the RECORD Study on 5993 participants recruited in 2011-2014, aged 34-84 years, and residing in Paris (France). To this existing dataset, we added Walk Score values for participants' residential address. We used multilevel linear models for the continuous outcomes and modified Poisson models were used for our categorical outcomes to estimate associations between the neighborhood Walk Score (both as a continuous and categorical variable) (0-100 score) and body mass index (BMI) (weight/height2 in kg/m2), obesity (kg/m2), waist circumference (cm), systolic blood pressure (SBP) (mmHg), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (mmHg), hypertension (mmHg), resting heart rate (RHR) (beats per minute), and neighborhood recreational walking (minutes per week). Most participants lived in Walker's Paradise (48.3%). In multivariate models (adjusted for individual variables, neighborhood variables, and risk factors for cardiometabolic outcomes), we found that neighborhood Walk Score was associated with decreased BMI (β: -0.010, 95% CI: -0.019 to -0.002 per unit increase), decreased waist circumference (β: -0.031, 95% CI: -0.054 to -0.008), increased neighborhood recreational walking (β: +0.73, 95% CI: +0.37 to +1.10), decreased SBP (β: -0.030, 95% CI: -0.063 to -0.0004), decreased DBP (β: -0.028, 95% CI: -0.047 to -0.008), and decreased resting heart rate (β: -0.026 95% CI: -0.046 to -0.005). Conclusions: In this large population-based study, we found that, even in a European context, living in a highly walkable neighborhood was associated with improved cardiometabolic health. Designing walkable neighborhoods may be a viable strategy in reducing cardiovascular disease prevalence at the population level.

Optimal Systolic Blood Pressure Target After SPRINT: Insights from a Network Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

Bangalore, S., Toklu, B., Gianos, E., Schwartzbard, A., Weintraub, H., Ogedegbe, O., & Messerli, F.H.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

American Journal of Medicine
10.1016/j.amjmed.2017.01.004
Abstract

Background: The optimal on-treatment blood pressure (BP) target has been a matter of debate. The recent SPRINT trial showed significant benefits of a BP target of <120 mm Hg, albeit with an increase in serious adverse effects related to low BP. Methods: PubMed, EMBASE, and CENTRAL were searched for randomized trials comparing treating with different BP targets. Trial arms were grouped into 5 systolic BP target categories: 1) <160 mm Hg, 2) <150 mm Hg, 3) <140 mm Hg, 4) <130 mm Hg, and 5) <120 mm Hg. Efficacy outcomes of stroke, myocardial infarction, death, cardiovascular death, heart failure, and safety outcomes of serious adverse effects were evaluated using a network meta-analysis. Results: Seventeen trials that enrolled 55,163 patients with 204,103 patient-years of follow-up were included. There was a significant decrease in stroke (rate ratio [RR] 0.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29-1.00) and myocardial infarction (RR 0.68; 95% CI, 0.47-1.00) with systolic BP <120 mm Hg (vs <160 mm Hg). Sensitivity analysis using achieved systolic BP showed a 72%, 97%, and 227% increase in stroke with systolic BP of <140 mm Hg, <150 mm Hg, and <160 mm, respectively, when compared with systolic BP <120 mm Hg. There was no difference in death, cardiovascular death, or heart failure when comparing any of the BP targets. However, the point estimate favored lower BP targets (<120 mm Hg, <130 mm Hg) when compared with higher BP targets (<140 mm Hg or <150 mm Hg). BP targets of <120 mm Hg and <130 mm Hg ranked #1 and #2, respectively, as the most efficacious target. There was a significant increase in serious adverse effects with systolic BP <120 mm Hg vs <150 mm Hg (RR 1.83; 95% CI, 1.05-3.20) or vs <140 mm Hg (RR 2.12; 95% CI, 1.46-3.08). BP targets of <140 mm Hg and <150 mm Hg ranked #1 and #2, respectively, as the safest target for the outcome of serious adverse effects. Cluster plots for combined efficacy and safety showed that a systolic BP target of <130 mm Hg had optimal balance between efficacy and safety. Conclusions: In patients with hypertension, a on-treatment systolic BP target of <130 mm Hg achieved optimal balance between efficacy and safety.

Psychosocial correlates of apparent treatment-resistant hypertension in the Jackson Heart Study

Shallcross, A.J., Butler, M., Tanner, R.M., Bress, A., Muntner, P., Shimbo, D., … Spruill, T.M.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Journal of Human Hypertension
10.1038/jhh.2016.100
Abstract

Apparent treatment-resistant hypertension (aTRH) is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. aTRH is common and disproportionately affects African Americans. The objective of this study is to explore psychosocial correlates of aTRH in a population-based cohort of African Americans with hypertension. The sample included 1392 participants in the Jackson Heart Study with treated hypertension who reported being adherent to their antihypertensive medications. aTRH was defined as uncontrolled clinic BP (⩾140/90 mm Hg) with ⩾3 classes of antihypertensive medication or treatment with ⩾4 classes of antihypertensive medication, including a diuretic. Self-reported medication adherence was defined as taking all prescribed antihypertensive medication in the 24 h before the study visit. The association of psychosocial factors (chronic stress, depressive symptoms, perceived social support and social network) with aTRH was evaluated using Poisson regression with progressive adjustment for demographic, clinical and behavioural factors. The prevalence of aTRH was 15.1% (n=210). Participants with aTRH had lower social network scores (that is, fewer sources of regular social contact) compared with participants without aTRH (P<0.01). No other psychosocial factors differed between groups. Social network was also the only psychosocial factor that was associated with aTRH prevalence in regression analyses. In age-, sex-adjusted and fully adjusted models, one additional unique source of social contact was associated with a 19% (PR=0.81; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.68–0.94, P=0.001) and a 13% (PR=0.87; 95% CI 0.74–1.0, P=0.041) lower prevalence of aTRH, respectively. Social network was independently associated with aTRH and warrants further investigation as a potentially modifiable determinant of aTRH in African Americans.Journal of Human Hypertension advance online publication, 26 January 2017; doi:10.1038/jhh.2016.100.

Self-monitoring of blood pressure in hypertension: A systematic review and individual patient data meta-analysis

Tucker, K.L., Sheppard, J.P., Stevens, R., Bosworth, H.B., Bove, A., Bray, E.P., … McManus, R.J.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

PLoS Medicine

Volume

14
10.1371/journal.pmed.1002389
Abstract

Background: Self-monitoring of blood pressure (BP) appears to reduce BP in hypertension but important questions remain regarding effective implementation and which groups may benefit most. This individual patient data (IPD) meta-analysis was performed to better understand the effectiveness of BP self-monitoring to lower BP and control hypertension. Methods and findings: Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched for randomised trials comparing self-monitoring to no self-monitoring in hypertensive patients (June 2016). Two reviewers independently assessed articles for eligibility and the authors of eligible trials were approached requesting IPD. Of 2,846 articles in the initial search, 36 were eligible. IPD were provided from 25 trials, including 1 unpublished study. Data for the primary outcomes—change in mean clinic or ambulatory BP and proportion controlled below target at 12 months—were available from 15/19 possible studies (7,138/8,292 [86%] of randomised participants). Overall, self-monitoring was associated with reduced clinic systolic blood pressure (sBP) compared to usual care at 12 months (−3.2 mmHg, [95% CI −4.9, −1.6 mmHg]). However, this effect was strongly influenced by the intensity of co-intervention ranging from no effect with self-monitoring alone (−1.0 mmHg [−3.3, 1.2]), to a 6.1 mmHg (−9.0, −3.2) reduction when monitoring was combined with intensive support. Self-monitoring was most effective in those with fewer antihypertensive medications and higher baseline sBP up to 170 mmHg. No differences in efficacy were seen by sex or by most comorbidities. Ambulatory BP data at 12 months were available from 4 trials (1,478 patients), which assessed self-monitoring with little or no co-intervention. There was no association between self-monitoring and either lower clinic or ambulatory sBP in this group (clinic −0.2 mmHg [−2.2, 1.8]; ambulatory 1.1 mmHg [−0.3, 2.5]). Results for diastolic blood pressure (dBP) were similar. The main limitation of this work was that significant heterogeneity remained. This was at least in part due to different inclusion criteria, self-monitoring regimes, and target BPs in included studies. Conclusions: Self-monitoring alone is not associated with lower BP or better control, but in conjunction with co-interventions (including systematic medication titration by doctors, pharmacists, or patients; education; or lifestyle counselling) leads to clinically significant BP reduction which persists for at least 12 months. The implementation of self-monitoring in hypertension should be accompanied by such co-interventions.

Sustaining Nurse-Led Task-Shifting Strategies for Hypertension Control: A Concept Mapping Study to Inform Evidence-Based Practice

Blackstone, S., Iwelunmor, J., Plange-Rhule, J., Gyamfi, J., Quakyi, N.K., Ntim, M., & Ogedegbe, O.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing
10.1111/wvn.12230
Abstract

Background: The use of task-shifting is an increasingly widespread delivery approach for health interventions targeting prevention, treatment, and control of hypertension in adults living in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Addressing a gap in the literature, this research examined the sustainability of an ongoing task-shifting strategy for hypertension (TASSH) from the perspectives of community health nurses (CHNs) implementing the program. Methods: We used concept-mapping, a mixed-methods participatory approach to understand CHNs' perceptions of barriers and enablers to sustaining a task-shifting program. Participants responded to focal prompts, eliciting statements regarding perceived barriers and enablers to sustaining TASSH, and then rated these ideas based on importance to the research questions and feasibility to address. Twenty-eight community health nurses (21 women, 7 men) from the Ashanti region of Ghana completed the concept-mapping process. Results: Factors influencing sustainability were grouped into five categories: Limited Drug Supply, Financial Support, Provision of Primary Health Care, Personnel Training, and Patient-Provider Communication. The limited supply of antihypertensive medication was considered by CHNs as the most important item to address, while providing training for intervention personnel was considered most feasible to address. Linking Evidence to Action: This study's findings highlight the importance of examining nurses' perceptions of factors likely to influence the sustainability of evidence-based, task-shifting interventions. Nurses' perceptions can guide the widespread uptake and dissemination of these interventions in resource-limited settings.

Tailored behavioral intervention among blacks with metabolic syndrome and sleep apnea: Results of the MetSO trial

Jean-Louis, G., Newsome, V., Williams, N.J., Zizi, F., Ravenell, J., & Ogedegbe, O.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Sleep

Volume

40
10.1093/sleep/zsw008
Abstract

Study Objectives: To assess effectiveness of a culturally and linguistically tailored telephone-delivered intervention to increase adherence to physician-recommended evaluation and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) among blacks. Methods: In a two-arm randomized controlled trial, we evaluated effectiveness of the tailored intervention among blacks with metabolic syndrome, relative to those in an attention control arm (n = 380; mean age = 58 ± 13; female = 71%). The intervention was designed to enhance adherence using culturally and linguistically tailored OSA health messages delivered by a trained health educator based on patients' readiness to change and unique barriers preventing desired behavior changes. Results: Analysis showed 69.4% of the patients in the intervention arm attended initial consultation with a sleep specialist, compared to 36.7% in the control arm; 74.7% of those in the intervention arm and 66.7% in the control arm completed diagnostic evaluation; and 86.4% in the intervention arm and 88.9% in the control arm adhered to PAP treatment based on subjective report. Logistic regression analyses adjusting for sociodemographic factors indicated patients in the intervention arm were 3.17 times more likely to attend initial consultation, compared to those in the control arm. Adjusted models revealed no significant differences between the two arms regarding adherence to OSA evaluation or treatment. Conclusion: The intervention was successful in promoting importance of sleep consultation and evaluation of OSA among blacks, while there was no significant group difference in laboratory-based evaluation and treatment adherence rates. It seems that the fundamental barrier to OSA care in that population may be the importance of seeking OSA care.

Thresholds for Ambulatory Blood Pressure among African Americans in the Jackson Heart Study

Ravenell, J., Shimbo, D., Booth, J.N., Sarpong, D.F., Agyemang, C., Moody, D.L., … Ogedegbe, O.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Circulation

Volume

135

Page(s)

2470-2480
10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.116.027051
Abstract

Background: Ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring is the reference standard for out-of-clinic BP measurement. Thresholds for identifying ambulatory hypertension (daytime systolic BP [SBP]/diastolic BP [DBP] ≥135/85 mm Hg, 24-hour SBP/DBP ≥130/80 mm Hg, and nighttime SBP/DBP ≥120/70 mm Hg) have been derived from European, Asian, and South American populations. We determined BP thresholds for ambulatory hypertension in a US population-based sample of African American adults. Methods: We analyzed data from the Jackson Heart Study, a population-based cohort study comprised exclusively of African American adults (n=5306). Analyses were restricted to 1016 participants who completed ambulatory BP monitoring at baseline in 2000 to 2004. Mean SBP and DBP levels were calculated for daytime (10:00 am-8:00 pm), 24-hour (all available readings), and nighttime (midnight-6:00 am) periods, separately. Daytime, 24-hour, and nighttime BP thresholds for ambulatory hypertension were identified using regression-and outcome-derived approaches. The composite of a cardiovascular disease or an all-cause mortality event was used in the outcome-derived approach. For this latter approach, BP thresholds were identified only for SBP because clinic DBP was not associated with the outcome. Analyses were stratified by antihypertensive medication use. Results: Among participants not taking antihypertensive medication, the regression-derived thresholds for daytime, 24-hour, and nighttime SBP/DBP corresponding to clinic SBP/DBP of 140/90 mm Hg were 134/85 mm Hg, 130/81 mm Hg, and 123/73 mm Hg, respectively. The outcome-derived thresholds for daytime, 24-hour, and nighttime SBP corresponding to a clinic SBP ≥140 mm Hg were 138 mm Hg, 134 mm Hg, and 129 mm Hg, respectively. Among participants taking antihypertensive medication, the regression-derived thresholds for daytime, 24-hour, and nighttime SBP/DBP corresponding to clinic SBP/DBP of 140/90 mm Hg were 135/85 mm Hg, 133/82 mm Hg, and 128/76 mm Hg, respectively. The corresponding outcome-derived thresholds for daytime, 24-hour, and nighttime SBP were 140 mm Hg, 137 mm Hg, and 133 mm Hg, respectively, among those taking antihypertensive medication. Conclusions: On the basis of the outcome-derived approach for SBP and regression-derived approach for DBP, the following definitions for daytime, 24-hour, and nighttime hypertension corresponding to clinic SBP/DBP ≥140/90 mm Hg are proposed for African American adults: daytime SBP/DBP ≥140/85 mm Hg, 24-hour SBP/DBP ≥135/80 mm Hg, and nighttime SBP/DBP ≥130/75 mm Hg, respectively.

Training nurses in task-shifting strategies for the management and control of hypertension in Ghana: a mixed-methods study

Gyamfi, J., Plange-Rhule, J., Iwelunmor, J., Lee, D., Blackstone, S.R., Mitchell, A., … Ogedegbe, O.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

BMC Health Services Research

Volume

17

Page(s)

1-9
10.1186/s12913-017-2026-5
Abstract

Background: Nurses in Ghana play a vital role in the delivery of primary health care at both the household and community level. However, there is lack of information on task shifting the management and control of hypertension to community health nurses in low- and middle-income countries including Ghana. The purpose of this study was to assess nurses' knowledge and practice of hypertension management and control pre- and post-training utilizing task-shifting strategies for hypertension control in Ghana (TASSH). Methods: A pre- and post- test survey was administered to 64 community health nurses (CHNs) and enrolled nurses (ENs) employed in community health centers and district hospitals before and after the TASSH training, followed by semi-structured qualitative interviews that assessed nurses' satisfaction with the training, resultant changes in practice and barriers and facilitators to optimal hypertension management. Results: A total of 64 CHNs and ENs participated in the TASSH training. The findings of the pre- and post-training assessments showed a marked improvement in nurses' knowledge and practice related to hypertension detection and treatment. At pre-assessment 26.9% of the nurses scored 80% or more on the hypertension knowledge test, whereas this improved significantly to 95.7% post-training. Improvement of interpersonal skills and patient education were also mentioned by the nurses as positive outcomes of participation in the intervention. Conclusions: Findings suggest that if all nurses receive even brief training in the management and control of hypertension, major public health benefits are likely to be achieved in low-income countries like Ghana. However, more research is needed to ascertain implementation fidelity and sustainability of interventions such as TASSH that highlight the potential role of nurses in mitigating barriers to optimal hypertension control in Ghana. Trial registration: Trial registration for parent TASSH study: NCT01802372 . Registered February 27, 2013.

Transportability of an Evidence-Based Early Childhood Intervention in a Low-Income African Country: Results of a Cluster Randomized Controlled Study

Huang, K.Y., Nakigudde, J., Rhule, D., Gumikiriza-Onoria, J.L., Abura, G., Kolawole, B., … Miller Brotman, L.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Prevention Science

Page(s)

1-12
10.1007/s11121-017-0822-0
Abstract

Children in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are burdened by significant unmet mental health needs. Despite the successes of numerous school-based interventions for promoting child mental health, most evidence-based interventions (EBIs) are not available in SSA. This study investigated the implementation quality and effectiveness of one component of an EBI from a developed country (USA) in a SSA country (Uganda). The EBI component, Professional Development, was provided by trained Ugandan mental health professionals to Ugandan primary school teachers. It included large-group experiential training and small-group coaching to introduce and support a range of evidence-based practices (EBPs) to create nurturing and predictable classroom experiences. The study was guided by the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research, the Teacher Training Implementation Model, and the RE-AIM evaluation framework. Effectiveness outcomes were studied using a cluster randomized design, in which 10 schools were randomized to intervention and wait-list control conditions. A total of 79 early childhood teachers participated. Teacher knowledge and the use of EBPs were assessed at baseline and immediately post-intervention (4–5 months later). A sample of 154 parents was randomly selected to report on child behavior at baseline and post-intervention. Linear mixed effect modeling was applied to examine effectiveness outcomes. Findings support the feasibility of training Ugandan mental health professionals to provide Professional Development for Ugandan teachers. Professional Development was delivered with high levels of fidelity and resulted in improved teacher EBP knowledge and the use of EBPs in the classroom, and child social competence.

What do You Need to Get Male Partners of Pregnant Women Tested for HIV in Resource Limited Settings? The Baby Shower Cluster Randomized Trial

Ezeanolue, E.E., Obiefune, M.C., Yang, W., Ezeanolue, C.O., Pharr, J., Osuji, A., … Ehiri, J.E.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

AIDS and Behavior

Volume

21

Page(s)

587-596
10.1007/s10461-016-1626-0
Abstract

Male partner involvement has the potential to increase uptake of interventions to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT). Finding cultural appropriate strategies to promote male partner involvement in PMTCT programs remains an abiding public health challenge. We assessed whether a congregation-based intervention, the Healthy Beginning Initiative (HBI), would lead to increased uptake of HIV testing among male partners of pregnant women during pregnancy. A cluster-randomized controlled trial of forty churches in Southeastern Nigeria randomly assigned to either the HBI (intervention group; IG) or standard of care referral to a health facility (control group; CG) was conducted. Participants in the IG received education and were offered onsite HIV testing. Overall, 2498 male partners enrolled and participated, a participation rate of 88.9%. Results showed that male partners in the IG were 12 times more likely to have had an HIV test compared to male partners of pregnant women in the CG (CG = 37.71% vs. IG = 84.00%; adjusted odds ratio = 11.9; p < .01). Culturally appropriate and community-based interventions can be effective in increasing HIV testing and counseling among male partners of pregnant women.

‘I believe high blood pressure can kill me: ’ using the PEN-3 Cultural Model to understand patients’ perceptions of an intervention to control hypertension in Ghana

Blackstone, S., Iwelunmor, J., Plange-Rhule, J., Gyamfi, J., Quakyi, N.k., Ntim, M., … Ogedegbe, O.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

Ethnicity and Health

Page(s)

1-14
10.1080/13557858.2017.1346178
Abstract

Objectives: Currently in Ghana, there is an on-going task-shifting strategy in which nurses are trained in hypertension management. While this study will provide useful information on the viability of this approach, it is not clear how patients in the intervention perceive hypertension, the task-shifting strategy, and its effects on blood pressure management. The objective of this paper is to examine patients’ perceptions of hypertension and hypertension management in the context of an on-going task-shifting intervention to manage blood pressure control in Ghana. Design: Forty-two patients participating in the Task Shifting Strategy for Hypertension program (23 males, 19 females, and mean age 61. 7 years) completed in-depth, qualitative interviews. Interviews were transcribed, and key words and phrases were extracted and coded using the PEN-3 Cultural Model as a guide through open and axial coding techniques, thus allowing rich exploration of the data. Results: Emergent themes included patients’ perceptions of hypertension, which encompassed misperceptions of hypertension and blood pressure control. Additional themes included enablers and barriers to hypertension management, and how the intervention nurtured lifestyle change associated with blood pressure control. Primary enabling factors included the supportive nature of TASSH nurses, while notable barriers were financial constraints and difficulty accessing medication. Nurturing factors included the motivational interviewing and patient counseling which instilled confidence in the patients that they could make lasting behavior changes. Conclusions: This study offers a unique perspective of blood pressure control by examining how patients view an on-going task-shifting initiative for hypertension management. The results of this study shed light on factors that can help and hinder individuals in low-resource settings with long-term blood pressure management.

A community-oriented framework to increase screening and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea among blacks

Williams, N.J., Jean-Louis, G., Ravenell, J., Seixas, A., Islam, N., Trinh-Shevrin, C., & Ogedegbe, O.

Publication year

2016

Journal title

Sleep Medicine

Volume

18

Page(s)

82-87
10.1016/j.sleep.2015.07.019
Abstract

Objective: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a leading sleep disorder that is disproportionately more prevalent in minority populations and is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality. OSA is associated with many chronic conditions including hypertension, diabetes, and obesity, all of which are disproportionately more prevalent among blacks (ie, peoples of African American, Caribbean, or African descent). Methods: This article reviews studies conducted in the United States (US) that investigated sleep screenings and adherence to treatment for OSA among blacks. In addition, guidelines are provided for implementing a practical framework to increase OSA screening and management among blacks. Results: Several studies have documented racial/ethnic disparities in adherence to treatment for OSA. However, despite its public health significance, there is a paucity of studies addressing these disparities. Further, there is a lack of health programs and policies to increase screening and treatment of OSA among blacks and other minority populations. A practical framework to increase the number of blacks who are screened for OSA and treated appropriately is warranted. Such a framework is timely and major importance, as early identification of OSA in this high-risk population could potentially lead to early treatment and prevention of CVD, thereby reducing racial and ethnic disparities in sleep-related CVD morbidity and mortality.

A Comparison of Measured and Self-Reported Blood Pressure Status among Low-Income Housing Residents in New York City

Williams, J., Duncan, D., Cantor, J., Elbel, B.D., Ogedegbe, O., & Ravenell, J.

Publication year

2016

Journal title

Journal of Health Disparities Research and Practice

Volume

9

Page(s)

153-165

A perspective on promoting diversity in the biomedical research workforce: The national heart, lung, and blood institute's pri de program

Boyington, J.E.A., Maihle, N.J., Rice, T.K., Gonzalez, J.E., Hess, C.A., Makala, L.H., … Boutjdir, M.

Publication year

2016

Journal title

Ethnicity and Disease

Volume

26

Page(s)

379-386
10.18865/ed.26.3.379
Abstract

Aspiring junior investigators from groups underrepresented in the biomedical sciences face various challenges as they pursue research independence. However, the biomedical research enterprise needs their participation to effectively address critical research issues such as health disparities and health inequities. In this article, we share a research education and mentoring initiative that seeks to address this challenge: Programs to Increase Diversity among Individuals Engaged in Health Related Research (PRIDE), funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). This longitudinal research-education and mentoring program occurs through summer institute programs located at US-based academic institutions. Recruited participants are exposed to didactic and lab-based research-skill enhancement experiences, with year-round mentoring over the course of two years. Mentor-mentee matching is based on shared research interests to promote congruence and to enhance skill acquisition. Program descriptions and sample narratives of participants' perceptions of PRIDE's impact on their career progress are showcased. Additionally, we highlight the overall program design and structure of four of seven funded summer institutes that focus on cardiovascular disease, related conditions, and health disparities. Mentees' testimonials about the value of the PRIDE mentoring approach in facilitating career development are also noted. Meeting the clinical and research needs of an increasingly diverse US population is an issue of national concern. The PRIDE initiative, which focuses on increasing research preparedness and professional development of groups underrepresented in the biomedical research workforce, with an emphasis on mentoring as the critical approach, provides a robust model that is impacting the careers of future investigators.