Andrea Deierlein

Andrea Deierlein
Andrea Deierlein

Assistant Professor of Public Health Nutrition

Professional overview

Dr. Andrea Deierlein is a nutritional and reproductive epidemiologist who studies dietary and environmental determinant of obesity and metabolic health-related outcomes. Her previous work focused on predictors and outcomes of gestational weight gain including maternal obesity, postpartum weight retention, and gestational diabetes. 

With the support of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, she is expanding her  research to investigate associations of prenatal and postnatal nutritional and environmental chemical exposures with disease outcomes.

Dr. Deierlein teaches Epidemiology for Global Health and Nutrition and Metabolism.

Education

BS, Animal Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
MS, Health Nutrition, Columbia University, New York, NY
MPH, Epidemiology, Columbia University, New York, NY
PhD, Nutrition Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC

Honors and awards

Travel Scholarship, Be Our Voice Childhood Obesity Prevention Advocacy Training, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (2013)
New York Academy of Sciences Education Fellowship (2012)
Postdoctoral Fellowship in Pediatric Environmental Health, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (2010)
Travel Scholarship, Researching Women’s Environmental Health: Food, Nutrition, and Obesity, University of Rochester Medical Center (2010)
Travel Scholarship, Childhood Obesity Symposium, University of Southern California (2010)

Areas of research and study

Environmental Public Health Services
Epidemiology
Maternal and Child Health
Nutrition
Women's Health

Publications

Publications

Correlates of Prenatal Diet Quality in Low-Income Hispanic Women

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Development of a technology-assisted food frequency questionnaire for elementary and middle school children: Findings from a pilot study

Deierlein, A., Bihuniak, J., Nagi, E., Litvak, J., Victoria, C., Braune, T., Weiss, R., & Parekh, N.

Publication year

2019

Journal title

Nutrients

Volume

11

Issue

5
Abstract
Background: This pilot study collected preliminary data for the modification of the VioScreen Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ), an adult-validated, self-administered, web-based dietary assessment tool for use in older children. Methods: A convenience sample of 55 children, aged 6–14 years, completed the VioScreen FFQ and 3-day diet record (reference standard). Caregivers completed a short sociodemographic questionnaire. Reported dietary intakes from the VioScreen FFQ and 3-day diet record were calculated using standard nutrient databases, and descriptive statistics were used to examine differences in food/beverage items and portion sizes between the two methods. Informal focus groups obtained user feedback and identified components of the VioScreen FFQ that required modifications. Results: The highest de-attenuated Pearson correlation coefficients between the VioScreen FFQ and 3-day diet record were observed for iron (r = 0.69), saturated fat (r = 0.59), and vegetables (r = 0.56), and the lowest were for whole grains (r = 0.11) and vitamin C (r = 0.16). Qualitative feedback was overall positive, and six technological modifications were identified. Conclusion: Findings from this pilot study provided valuable information on the process of evaluating the use of the VioScreen FFQ among older children, and will inform the future development of a modified version for this population.

Do Women Know Their Prepregnancy Weight?

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Processing level and diet quality of the US grocery cart: Is there an association?

Juul, F., Simões, B. D. S., Litvak, J., Martinez-Steele, E., Deierlein, A., Vadiveloo, M., & Parekh, N.

Publication year

2019

Journal title

Public Health Nutrition

Volume

22

Issue

13

Page(s)

2357-2366
Abstract
Objective: The majority of groceries purchased by US households are industrially processed, yet it is unclear how processing level influences diet quality. We sought to determine if processing level is associated with diet quality of grocery purchases. Design: We analysed grocery purchasing data from the National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey 2012-2013. Household grocery purchases were categorized by the NOVA framework as minimally processed, processed culinary ingredients, processed foods or ultra-processed foods. The energy share of each processing level (percentage of energy; %E) and Healthy Eating Index-2015 (HEI-2015) component and total scores were calculated for each household's purchases. The association between %E from processed foods and ultra-processed foods, respectively, and HEI-2015 total score was determined by multivariable linear regression. Foods purchased by households with the highest v. lowest ultra-processed food purchases and HEI-2015 total score <40 v. ≥60 were compared using linear regression. Setting: USA. Participants: Nationally representative sample of 3961 households. Results: Processed foods and ultra-processed foods provided 9·2 (se 0·3) % and 55·8 (se 0·6) % of purchased energy, respectively. Mean HEI-2015 score was 54·7 (se 0·4). Substituting 10 %E from minimally processed foods and processed culinary ingredients for ultra-processed foods decreased total HEI-2015 score by 1·8 points (β = -1·8; 95 % CI -2·0, -1·5). Processed food purchases were not associated with diet quality. Among households with high ultra-processed food purchases, those with HEI-2015 score <40 purchased less minimally processed plant-foods than households with HEI-2015 score ≥60. Conclusions: Increasing purchases of minimally processed foods, decreasing purchases of ultra-processed foods and selecting healthier foods at each processing level may improve diet quality.

Weight Perception, Weight Control Intentions, and Dietary Intakes among Adolescents Ages 10⁻15 Years in the United States

Deierlein, A., Malkan, A., Litvak, J., & Parekh, N.

Publication year

2019

Journal title

International journal of environmental research and public health

Volume

16

Issue

6
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To examine associations of adolescents' weight status perception and weight control intentions with dietary intakes. METHODS: Cross-sectional data from adolescents aged 10⁻15 in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, 2005⁻2014 (n = 4940). Adolescents responded to questions regarding weight perception and if they were trying to change their weight. Intakes of calories, protein, carbohydrate, fat, saturated fat, sugar, and fiber were assessed using 24-h dietary recalls. Multivariable linear regression estimated associations of intakes with weight perception and weight control intentions. RESULTS: The majority of adolescents perceived their weight as "about right"; however, 45% and 46% of boys and girls, respectively, reported trying to change their weight. Weight perception was not associated with intakes, with the exception of lower sugar (-13.65 g, 95% CI: -23.06, -4.23) and higher percent calories from protein (1.01%, 95% CI: 0.16, 1.87) in boys with overweight/obesity who perceived themselves as overweight, as well as lower percent calories from saturated fat (-1.04%, 95% CI: -2.24, -0.17) among girls with normal weight who perceived themselves as overweight. Weight control intentions were associated with intakes in boys only. Compared to boys who never tried to lose weight, boys who tried to lose weight consumed fewer calories (-188.34 kcal, 95% CI: -357.67, -19.01), a lower percent of calories from fat (-1.41%, 95% CI: -2.80, -0.02), and a greater percent of calories from protein (1.48%, 95% CI: 0.41, 2.55). CONCLUSIONS: Despite perceiving weight as "about right", many adolescents reported trying to change their weight, which was associated with some dietary intakes. Efforts may be necessary to educate adolescents on healthy nutrition and weight management behaviors.

Concerns About Current Breast Milk Intake Measurement for Population-Based Studies

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Folic Acid Supplementation to Prevent Recurrent Neural Tube Defects: 4 Milligrams Is Too Much

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Lead exposure during childhood and subsequent anthropometry through adolescence in girls

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Phenol concentrations during childhood and subsequent measures of adiposity among young girls

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Is meeting the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for protein related to body composition among older adults?: Results from the cardiovascular health of seniors and built environment study

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Longitudinal associations of phthalate exposures during childhood and body size measurements in young girls

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Comparison of the nutrient content of children's menu items at US restaurant chains, 2010-2014

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Analysis of the Caloric and Macronutrient Content of Meal Options Offered to Children at Popular Restaurant Chains

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Diet Quality of Urban Older Adults Age 60 to 99 Years: The Cardiovascular Health of Seniors and Built Environment Study

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Local food environments are associated with girls' energy, sugar-sweetened beverage and snack-food intakes

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An anthropometric model to estimate neonatal fat mass using air displacement plethysmography

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Gestational weight gain and predicted changes in offspring anthropometrics between early infancy and 3 years

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How can we assist women in managing gestational weight gain?

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Long–term consequences of obesity in pregnancy for the mother

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Maternal Glucose and Child BMI in the Young

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Physical activity during pregnancy and risk of hyperglycemia

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Postpartum Weight Retention, Chronic Disease, and Optimal Inter-Pregnancy Interval

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Childhood Hair Product Use and Earlier Age at Menarche in a Racially Diverse Study Population: A Pilot Study

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Effects of pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain on infant anthropometric outcomes

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The association between maternal glucose concentration and child BMI at age 3 years

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Contact

ald8@nyu.edu +1 (212) 998-5581 715 Broadway New York, NY 10003