Donna Shelley

Donna Shelley
Donna Shelley

Professor of Public Health Policy and Management

Director of Global Center for Implementation Science

Professional overview

Dr. Shelley is a tenured Professor of Global Public Health in the NYU School of Global Public Health in the Department of Policy and Public Health Management.  She is founding Director of the School’s Global Center for Implementation Science and is Co-Director of the Epidemiology and Cancer Control Program at the NYU Perlmutter Cancer Center. Her work is motivated by a deep commitment to reducing tobacco-related disparities in morbidity and mortality in the US and Viet Nam. In pursuit of this goal, she has built a rigorous program of translational, population-based, and policy-relevant research to optimize implementation of tobacco use treatment in health care delivery systems, accelerate implementation of tobacco control policies and to develop innovative ways to improve access to and treatment of nicotine addiction among people with comorbid conditions.

Her record of extramural funding includes awards from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA), Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ),  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the New York State Department of Health . Dr. Shelley received her MD from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and MPH in Health Policy and Management at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health.  
 

Publications

Publications

A taxonomy for external support for practice transformation

Adaptation and assessment of a text messaging smoking cessation intervention in Vietnam: Pilot randomized controlled trial

Barriers to engagement in implementation science research: A national survey

Cost Analysis of Community-Based Smoking Cessation Services in Vietnam: A Cluster-Randomized Trial

Development of a homelessness risk screening tool for emergency department patients

E-cigarette use and beliefs among adult smokers with substance use disorders

Effectiveness and Reach of the Primary Palliative Care for Emergency Medicine (PRIM-ER) Pilot Study: a Qualitative Analysis

Effectiveness of an integrated engagement support system to facilitate patient use of digital diabetes prevention programs: Protocol for a randomized controlled trial

Lawrence, K., Rodriguez, D. V., Feldthouse, D. M., Shelley, D., Yu, J. L., Belli, H. M., Gonzalez, J., Tasneem, S., Fontaine, J., Groom, L. L., Luu, S., Wu, Y., McTigue, K. M., Rockette-Wagner, B., & Mann, D. M.

Publication year

2021

Journal title

JMIR Research Protocols

Volume

10

Issue

2
Abstract
Abstract
Background: Digital diabetes prevention programs (dDPPs) are effective behavior change tools to prevent disease progression in patients at risk for diabetes. At present, these programs are poorly integrated into existing health information technology infrastructure and clinical workflows, resulting in barriers to provider-level knowledge of, interaction with, and support of patients who use dDPPs. Tools that can facilitate patient-provider interaction around dDPPs may contribute to improved patient engagement and adherence to these programs and improved health outcomes. Objective: This study aims to use a rigorous, user-centered design (UCD) methodology to develop a theory-driven system that supports patient engagement with dDPPs and their primary care providers with their care. Methods: This study will be conducted in 3 phases. In phase 1, we will use systematic UCD, Agile software development, and qualitative research methods to identify key user (patients, providers, clinical staff, digital health technologists, and content experts) requirements, constraints, and prioritization of high-impact features to design, develop, and refine a viable intervention prototype for the engagement system. In phase 2, we will conduct a single-arm feasibility pilot of the engagement system among patients with prediabetes and their primary care providers. In phase 3, we will conduct a 2-arm randomized controlled trial using the engagement system. Primary outcomes will be weight, BMI, and A1c at 6 and 12 months. Secondary outcomes will be patient engagement (use and activity) in the dDPP. The mediator variables (self-efficacy, digital health literacy, and patient-provider relationship) will be measured. Results: The project was initiated in 2018 and funded in September 2019. Enrollment and data collection for phase 1 began in September 2019 under an Institutional Review Board quality improvement waiver granted in July 2019. As of December 2020, 27 patients have been enrolled and first results are expected to be submitted for publication in early 2021. The study received Institutional Review Board approval for phases 2 and 3 in December 2020, and phase 2 enrollment is expected to begin in early 2021. Conclusions: Our findings will provide guidance for the design and development of technology to integrate dDPP platforms into existing clinical workflows. This will facilitate patient engagement in digital behavior change interventions and provider engagement in patients’ use of dDPPs. Integrated clinical tools that can facilitate patient-provider interaction around dDPPs may contribute to improved patient adherence to these programs and improved health outcomes by addressing barriers faced by both patients and providers. Further evaluation with pilot testing and a clinical trial will assess the effectiveness and implementation of these tools.

Health-Related Social Needs Among Emergency Department Patients with HIV

Gerber, E., Gelberg, L., Cowan, E., Mijanovich, T., Shelley, D., Gulati, R., Wittman, I., & Doran, K. M.

Publication year

2021

Journal title

AIDS and Behavior

Volume

25

Issue

6

Page(s)

1968-1974
Abstract
Abstract
Little research has examined the health-related social needs of emergency department (ED) patients who have HIV. We surveyed a random sample of public hospital ED patients and compared the social needs of patients with and without HIV. Social needs were high among all ED patients, but patients with HIV reported significantly higher levels of food insecurity (65.0% vs. 50.3%, p = 0.01) and homelessness or living doubled up (33.8% vs. 21.0%, p < 0.01) than other patients. Our findings suggest the importance of assessing social needs in ED-based interventions for patients with HIV.

Implementation, interrupted: Identifying and leveraging factors that sustain after a programme interruption

Implementation, interrupted: Identifying and leveraging factors that sustain after a programme interruption

Leveraging technology to address unhealthy drug use in primary care: Effectiveness of the Substance use Screening and Intervention Tool (SUSIT)

Rapid Transition to Telehealth and the Digital Divide: Implications for Primary Care Access and Equity in a Post-COVID Era

Social relationships, homelessness, and substance use among emergency department patients

A cross-cutting workforce solution for implementing community–clinical linkage models

A qualitative assessment of factors influencing implementation and sustainability of evidence-based tobacco use treatment in Vietnam health centers

VanDevanter, N., Vu, M., Nguyen, A., Nguyen, T., Van Minh, H., Nguyen, N. T., & Shelley, D. R.

Publication year

2020

Journal title

Implementation Science

Volume

15

Issue

1
Abstract
Abstract
Background: Effective strategies are needed to increase implementation and sustainability of evidence-based tobacco dependence treatment (TDT) in public health systems in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Our two-arm cluster randomized controlled trial (VQuit) found that a multicomponent implementation strategy was effective in increasing provider adherence to TDT guidelines in commune health center (CHCs) in Vietnam. In this paper, we present findings from a post-implementation qualitative assessment of factors influencing effective implementation and program sustainability. Methods: We conducted semi-structured qualitative interviews (n = 52) with 13 CHC medical directors (i.e., physicians), 25 CHC health care providers (e.g., nurses), and 14 village health workers (VHWs) in 13 study sites. Interviews were transcribed and translated into English. Two qualitative researchers used both deductive (guided by the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research) and inductive approaches to analysis. Results: Facilitators of effective implementing of TDT included training and point-of-service tools (e.g., desktop chart with prompts for offering brief counseling) that increased knowledge and self-efficacy, patient demand for TDT, and a referral system, available in arm 2, which reduced the provider burden by shifting more intensive cessation counseling to a trained VHW. The primary challenges to sustainability were competing priorities that are driven by the Ministry of Health and may result in fewer resources for TDT compared with other health programs. However, providers and VHWs suggested several options for adapting the intervention and implementation strategies to address challenges and increasing engagement of local government committees and other sectors to sustain gains. Conclusion: Our findings offer insights into how a multicomponent implementation strategy influenced changes in the delivery of evidence-based TDT. In addition, the results illustrate the dynamic interplay between barriers and facilitators for sustaining TDT at the policy and community/practice level, particularly in the context of centralized public health systems like Vietnam’s. Sustaining gains in practice improvement and clinical outcomes will require strategies that include ongoing engagement with policymakers and other stakeholders at the national and local level, and planning for adaptations and subsequent resource allocations in order to meet the World Health Organization’s goals promoting access to effective treatment for all tobacco users.

Accounting for Blood Pressure Seasonality Alters Evaluation of Practice-Level Blood Pressure Control Intervention

Attributes of High-Performing Small Practices in a Guideline Implementation: A Multiple-Case Study

Barriers and Facilitators in the Recruitment and Retention of More Than 250 Small Independent Primary Care Practices for EvidenceNOW

Cardiovascular Disease Guideline Adherence: An RCT Using Practice Facilitation

Challenges to implementing the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control guidelines on tobacco cessation treatment: a qualitative analysis

Chinese immigrant smokers’ access barriers to tobacco cessation services and experience using social media and text messaging

Electronic Cigarette Aerosol Modulates the Oral Microbiome and Increases Risk of Infection

Evaluation of Secondhand Smoke Exposure in New York City Public Housing After Implementation of the 2018 Federal Smoke-Free Housing Policy

Homeless Shelter Entry in the Year After an Emergency Department Visit: Results From a Linked Data Analysis