Jo Ivey Boufford

Jo Ivey Boufford
Jo Ivey Boufford

Clinical Professor of Global Health

Professional overview

With extensive experience in medicine, international affairs, health policy, and public administration, Dr. Jo Ivey Boufford is an expert in urban health, healthy aging, disease prevention, and health promotion and health disparities.

Since college, Dr. Boufford has integrated activism and social justice in her education and practice by advocating for patient-driven care and more engagement with the community and the underserved. In 1985, she became the first woman to be elected President of New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation, the largest municipal system in the United States. She then entered federal government, serving as Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for health in the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). While at HHS, she was the U.S. representative on the Executive Board of the World Health Organization. With the Gates Foundation and with a focus on Africa, she developed a new global health leadership initiative through teacher trainings.

Dr. Boufford is a member and has also served in the leadership of numerous public health, national education, and medical organizations, including: the New York State Public Health and Health Planning Council, the United Hospital Fund, the Primary Care Development Corporation and Public Health Solutions, the Village Center for Care, the International Women's Health Coalition, the Council and Chair of its Public Health Committee, the Regional Plan Association, the Health Effects Institute, the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration, the National Academy of Medicine,  the National Academy of Public Administration, and the New York Academy of Medicine, the National Council on Graduate Medical Education, the National Advisory Council for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the Commonwealth Fund.

At NYU, Dr. Boufford has been a Professor of Public Administration and Dean of the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, as well as a Clinical Professor of Pediatrics at the NYU Medical School.

Education

BA, Psychology (Magna Cum Laude), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
MD, Medicine (with distinction), University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI

Honors and awards

Honorary Doctorate of Science, Toledo University, Toledo, OH (2012)
Honorary Doctorate of Science, Pace University, New York, NY (2011)
Top 100 Most Influential Women, Crain's New York Business (2007)
Honorary Doctorate of Science, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (2007)
Honorary Doctorate of Science, State University of New York, Brooklyn, NY (1992)
Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellowship, Institute of Medicine in Washington, DC (1980)

Areas of research and study

Aging and the Life Course
Gates Foundation
Health Disparities
Health Promotion
International Health
New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation
Prevention Interventions
Public Administration
Public Health Management
Public Health Policy
Public Health Systems
US Department of Health and Human Services
World Health Organization

Publications

Publications

Systems science simulation modeling to inform urban health policy and planning

Li, Y., Boufford, J. I., & Pagán, J. A. In Springer Optimization and Its Applications.

Publication year

2017

Volume

125

Page(s)

151-166
Abstract
More than half of the population in the world lives in cities and urban populations are still rapidly expanding. Increasing population growth in cities inevitably brings about the intensification of urban health problems. The multidimensional nature of factors associated with health together with the dynamic, interconnected environment of cities moderates the effects of policies and interventions that are designed to improve population health. With the emergence of the “Internet of Things” and the availability of “Big Data,” policymakers and practitioners are in need of a new set of analytical tools to comprehensively understand the social, behavioral, and environmental factors that shape population health in cities. Systems science, an interdisciplinary field that draws concepts, theories, and evidence from fields such as computer science, engineering, social planning, economics, psychology, and epidemiology, has shown promise in providing practical conceptual and analytical approaches that can be used to solve urban health problems. This chapter describes the level of complexity that characterizes urban health problems and provides an overview of systems science features and methods that have shown great promise to address urban health challenges. We provide two specific examples to showcase systems science thinking: one using a system dynamics model to prioritize interventions that involve multiple social determinants of health in Toronto, Canada, and the other using an agent-based model to evaluate the impact of different food policies on dietary behaviors in NewYork City. These examples suggest that systems science has the potential to foster collaboration among researchers, practitioners, and policymakers from different disciplines to evaluate interconnected data and address challenging urban health problems.

The Lancet Commission on pollution and health

Landrigan, P. J., Fuller, R., Acosta, N. J., Adeyi, O., Arnold, R., Basu, N., Baldé, A. B., Bertollini, R., Bose-O’Reilly, S., Boufford, J. I., Breysse, P. N., Chiles, T., Mahidol, C., Coll-Seck, A. M., Cropper, M. L., Fobil, J., Fuster, V., Greenstone, M., Haines, A., Hanrahan, D., Hunter, D., Khare, M., Krupnick, A., Lanphear, B., Lohani, B., Martin, K., Mathiasen, K. V., McTeer, M. A., Murray, C. J., Ndahimananjara, J. D., Perera, F., Potočnik, J., Preker, A. S., Ramesh, J., Rockström, J., Salinas, C., Samson, L. D., Sandilya, K., Sly, P. D., Smith, K. R., Steiner, A., Stewart, R. B., Suk, W. A., Van Schayck, O. C., Yadama, G. N., Yumkella, K., & Zhong, M.

Publication year

2017

Journal title

The Lancet

Innovating healthcare delivery to address noncommunicable diseases in low-income settings: The example of hypertension

Piot, P., Aerts, A., Wood, D. A., Lamptey, P., Oti, S., Connell, K., Dorairaj, P., Boufford, J. I., Caldwell, A., & Perel, P.

Publication year

2016

Journal title

Future Cardiology

Volume

12

Issue

4

Page(s)

401-403
Abstract
London Dialogue event, The Hospital Club, 24 Endell St, London, WC2H 9HQ, London, UK, 1 December 2015 Hypertension is a global health issue causing almost 10 million deaths annually, with a disproportionate number occurring in low- and middle-income countries. The condition can be managed effectively, but there is a need for innovation in healthcare delivery to alleviate its burden. This paper presents a number of innovative delivery models from a number of different countries, including Kenya, Ghana, Barbados and India. These models were presented at the London Dialogue event, which was cohosted by the Novartis Foundation and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Centre for Global Noncommunicable Diseases on 1 December 2015. It is argued that these models are applicable not only to hypertension, but provide valuable lessons to address other noncommunicable diseases.

The challenge of attribution: Responsibility for population health in the context of accountable care

Gourevitch, M. N., Cannell, T., Boufford, J. I., & Summers, C.

Publication year

2012

Journal title

American Journal of Preventive Medicine

Volume

42

Issue

6

The challenge of attribution: Responsibility for population health in the context of accountable care

Gourevitch, M. N., Cannell, T., Boufford, J. I., & Summers, C.

Publication year

2012

Journal title

American Journal of Public Health

Volume

102
Abstract
One of the 3 goals for accountable care organizations is to improve population health. This will require that accountable care organizations bridge the schism between clinical care and public health. But do health care delivery organizations and public health agencies share a concept of " population"? We think not: whereas delivery systems define populations in terms of persons receiving care, public health agencies typically measure health on the basis of geography. This creates an attribution problem, particularly in large urban centers, where multiple health care providers often serve any given neighborhood. We suggest potential innovations that could allow urban accountable care organizations to accept accountability, and rewards, for measurably improving population health.

Andrew Pattullo Lecture. Health future: the managerial agenda.

Boufford, J. I.

Publication year

1999

Journal title

The Journal of health administration education

Volume

17

Issue

4

Page(s)

271-295

Crisis, leadership, consensus: The past and future federal role in health

Boufford, J. I.

Publication year

1999

Journal title

Journal of Urban Health

Volume

76

Issue

2

Page(s)

192-206
Abstract
This paper touches on patterns of federal government involvement in the health sector since the late 18th century to the present and speculates on its role in the early decades of the 21st century. Throughout the history of the US, government involvement in the health sector came only in the face of crisis, only when there was widespread consensus, and only through sustained leadership. One of the first health-related acts of Congress came about as a matter of interstate commerce regarding the dilemma as to what to do about treating merchant seamen who had no affiliation with any state. Further federal actions were implemented to address epidemics, such as from yellow fever, that traveled from state to state through commercial ships. Each federal action was met with concern and resistance from states' rights advocates, who asserted that the health of the public was best left to the states and localities. It was not until the early part of the 20th century that a concern for social well-being, not merely commerce, drove the agenda for public health action. Two separate campaigns for national health insurance, as well as a rapid expansion of programs to serve the specific health needs of specific populations, led finally to the introduction of Medicaid and Medicare in the 1960s, the most dramatic example of government intervention in shaping the personal health care delivery system in the latter half of the 20th century. As health costs continued to rise and more and more Americans lacked adequate health insurance, a perceived crisis led President Clinton to launch his 1993 campaign to insure every American - the third attempt in this century to provide universal coverage. While the crisis was perceived by many, there was no consensus on action, and leadership outside government was missing. Today, the health care crisis still looms. Despite an economic boom, 1 million Americans lose their health insurance each year, with 41 million Americans, or 15% of the population, lacking coverage. Private premiums are going up again as federal programs are capped and the lack of a federal framework for quality assurance leads to growing problems of access and quality that will need to be addressed as we enter the 21st century. What role will government play?.

New approaches to academic health center affiliations: public hospitals and the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Boufford, J. I., Gage, L., Kizer, K. W., Marcos, L. R., Short, J. H., & Garrett, K. E.

Publication year

1999

Journal title

Issue brief (Commonwealth Fund)

Issue

330

Page(s)

1-5

Marijuana: current federal law remains in effect.

Boufford, J. I., & Richard, M. M.

Publication year

1997

Journal title

Connecticut medicine

Volume

61

Issue

4

Page(s)

229-230

Round table ... management development.

Boufford, J. I., Hunter, D., Wall, A., & Glascott, F.

Publication year

1993

Journal title

The Health service journal

Volume

103

Issue

5366

Page(s)

20-22
Abstract
Management development in the NHS has reached a hiatus, yet there are no apparent moves from the centre to address this. The Journal brought together senior figures from the four dedicated management development providers in an informal round table discussion, chaired by Rob MacLachlan, to open the debate.

US and UK health care reforms: reflections on quality.

Boufford, J. I.

Publication year

1993

Journal title

Quality in health care : QHC

Volume

2

Issue

4

Page(s)

249-252

Primary care: Graduate medical education

Boufford, J. I.

Publication year

1992

Journal title

Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine: Journal of Urban Health

Volume

68

Issue

2

Page(s)

193-206

Managing the unmanageable: Public hospital systems

Boufford, J. I.

Publication year

1991

Journal title

The International Journal of Health Planning and Management

Volume

6

Issue

2

Page(s)

143-154
Abstract
There are significant challenges to those who work in large public health care delivery systems: political imperatives; resource constraints; sometimes rigid personnel systems; and, the reality that everything occurs in a public forum. The fact that many nations are reviewing and, in some instances, restructuring their national health care systems, has added to the complexity and feeling of continual turbulence experienced by their managers. State run systems like that in the United Kingdom are introducing market forces to increase effectiveness and value for money; while market systems, like that in the United States, are increasing regulatory interventions to achieve the kind of cost control available to countries with large public systems which operate with global budgets. Public hospitals in the United States offer examples of public institutions operating in a highly competitive market environment. A decade of management changes undertaken to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC), the largest public hospital system in the United States, is presented as a case study of public health services and public management in a market environment.

Models for increasing access: strengthening community health centers & a national health service corps.

Boufford, J. I.

Publication year

1990

Journal title

Journal of health care for the poor and underserved

Volume

1

Issue

1

Page(s)

107-115 discussion 123

One person's health care perspective from both sides of the Atlantic.

Boufford, J. I.

Publication year

1990

Journal title

Michigan hospitals

Volume

26

Issue

9

Page(s)

20-21

Federally Supported Primary Care Training Programs and Pediatric Careers

Shelov, S. P., Alpert, J. J., Rayman, I., Straus, J. H., Fallon, S., & Boufford, J.

Publication year

1987

Journal title

American Journal of Diseases of Children

Volume

141

Issue

1

Page(s)

65-66

Evaluating self-help support groups for medical students

Goetzel, R. Z., Croen, L. G., Shelov, S., Boufford, J. I., & Levin, G.

Publication year

1984

Journal title

Journal of Medical Education

Volume

59

Issue

4

Page(s)

331-340
Abstract
Self-help support groups for medical students represent one strategy for dealing with the emotional stresses of medical training and the diminished human sensitivity of students that often accompanies that experience. Support groups at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine were evaluated by 26 students who completed a nine-part questionnaire. The respondents indicated that they were primarily drawn to these groups because of a desire for social affiliation and an opportunity to express their feelings in a “safe” environment. Members shared in the leadership responsibilities of the group and dealt with external personal problems of the students rather than with the internal group dynamics. The gains derived from participation in these groups included opportunities for nonprofessional contact with faculty members, getting help and support from fellow students, and participation in stimulating discussions about the medical field. Students rated the groups as “meaningful” and expressed a desire for more frequent meetings.

Evaluating self-help support groups for medical students

Goetzel, R. Z., Croen, L. G., Shelov, S., Boufford, J. I., & Levin, G.

Publication year

1984

Journal title

Academic Medicine

Volume

59

Issue

4

Page(s)

331-340
Abstract
Self-help support groups for medical students represent one strategy for dealing with the emotional stresses of medical training and the diminished human sensitivity of students that often accompanies that experience. Support groups at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine were evaluated by 26 students who completed a nine-part questionnaire. The respondents indicated that they were primarily drawn to these groups because of a desire for social affiliation and an opportunity to express their feelings in a “safe” environment. Members shared in the leadership responsibilities of the group and dealt with external personal problems of the students rather than with the internal group dynamics. The gains derived from participation in these groups included opportunities for nonprofessional contact with faculty members, getting help and support from fellow students, and participation in stimulating discussions about the medical field. Students rated the groups as “meaningful” and expressed a desire for more frequent meetings.

Offshore medical school graduates - a view from the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation

Boufford, J. I.

Publication year

1984

Journal title

New York State Journal of Medicine

Volume

84

Issue

7

Page(s)

358-360

Patients in municipal hospitals awaiting an alternate level of care.

Rothenberg, E., Berson, A., Cunningham, L., Brill, M. F., Kleinbart, S., & Boufford, J. I.

Publication year

1984

Journal title

Pride Institute journal of long term home health care

Volume

3

Issue

1

Page(s)

13-19

How federal laws are made--and what we should be doing about it.

Boufford, J.

Publication year

1982

Journal title

Journal of the American Medical Women's Association

Volume

37

Issue

5

Page(s)

115-117

Team care: learning to pull together.

Boufford, J.

Publication year

1980

Journal title

The Internist

Volume

21

Issue

9

Page(s)

13-15

Residency program in social medicine and family practice.

Boufford, J.

Publication year

1979

Journal title

Journal of Ambulatory Care Management

Volume

2

Issue

2

Page(s)

66-71

Primary care residency training: the first five years

Boufford, J. I.

Publication year

1977

Journal title

Annals of Internal Medicine

Volume

87

Issue

3

Page(s)

359-368
Abstract
The training of physicians for the delivery of primary care is becoming a national priority. The period of residency training is viewed by many as the focal point for educational change to meet this demand. The Residency Program in Social Medicine at Montefiore Hospital and Medical Center was begun in 1970 and offers primary care residency training toward board eligibility in internal medicine, pediatrics, or family practice. The pairing concept of scheduling guarantees the resident a continuity of care experience for his own panel of patients at the ambulatory site. The hospital and the ambulatory site share the cost of residents' salaries. Primary care curriculum for clinical and clinical-support areas, delivery-site design, and faculty-utilization models must all be uniquely suited to the training of the future primary care practitioner. Resident recruitment and selection and the involvement of residents in the management of the residency program are crucial features of program success and training for future practice.

An integrated clinical correlation course in the neurosciences for first-year medical students

Talalla, A., Boufford, J. I., & Lass, S. L.

Publication year

1974

Journal title

Journal of Medical Education

Volume

49

Issue

3

Page(s)

253-263
Abstract
An increasing number of medical schools are undertaking substantial curricular revisions embodying such concepts as small-group teaching, early patient contact, and active student participation in the learning process-all within the organ-system approach to learning. One system that seems to be especially suited to the new approach is that of the neurosciences. A clinical correlation course in the neurosciences was conducted for freshman medical students at the University of Southern California in 1970. Twenty-three instructors, all practicing clinicians and most of them neurosurgeons, provided small-group experiences for the 98 students during the seven-week course. This report contains a description of the design, coordination, implementation, and evaluation of the course and of the major factors which contributed to its successful outcome. The evaluation data provide some interesting insights into this teaching-learning process that are applicable to many educational experiences.