Peter S Navario

Navario, Peter
Peter S Navario

Clinical Assistant Professor of Public Health Policy and Management

Executive Director, HealthRight International

Professional overview

Dr. Peter Navario has extensive field experience establishing, monitoring, and evaluating HIV/AIDS treatment programs and health system capacity building across sub-Saharan Africa. He was the chair of the Botswana Ministry of Health’s National HIV/AIDS Health Professional Training Committee and lead evaluator of the World Bank’s Treatment Access Programme in Burkina Faso. As a Fellow for Global Health at the Council of Foreign Relations, he published, lectured, convened, and facilitated meetings around scaling up access to HIV/AIDS treatment with leaders from many organizations, including the Joint United Nations HIV/AIDS Program (UNAIDS). He then served as a Technical Advisor to the UNAIDS on numerous initiatives, including the the Post-2015 Development Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals, the 2011 UN General Assembly High Level Meeting on HIV/AIDS, and the UN Secretary General’s Global Strategy on Women’s and Children’s Health. 

In Ukraine, Dr. Navario researched substance use and sexual HIV risk behaviors of displaced young adults from Kiev and Donestsk regions in pre-conflict, transitions, and camp settings, in order to identify risk factors in each setting. In Kenya, he is assessing the feasibility, acceptability, and impact of pre-exposure prophylaxis on HIV risk among male sex workers.

As the Executive Director of HealthRight International, Dr. Navario partners with NYU on global health programming and research, training opportunities for future public health leaders, and thought leadership. Additionally, he is on the editorial board of the journal Global Health Governance, and has written on HIV/AIDS policy and other global health issues in various publications, including the Lancet, the Huffington Post, cfr.org, and Global Health Magazine.

Education

BA, Psychology and French (Honors), Leigh University, Bethlehem, PA
MPH, Global Health, Yale University, New Haven, CT
PhD, Health Economics, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa

Areas of research and study

Applied Economics
Cost Effectiveness
Global Health
Health Economics
Health of Marginalized Population
HIV/AIDS
Human Rights
Public Health Policy

Publications

Publications

Factors associated with experiencing sexual violence among female gender-based violence survivors in conflict-afflicted eastern Ukraine

Capasso, A., Skipalska, H., Guttmacher, S., Tikhonovsky, N. G., Navario, P., & Castillo, T. P.

Publication year

2021

Journal title

BMC public health

Volume

21

Issue

1
Abstract
Abstract
Background: Since 2014, over 1.6 million people have been forcibly displaced by the conflict in eastern Ukraine. In 2014, 8% of reproductive-aged women in Ukraine had ever experienced sexual violence, compared to 5% in 2007. This increase was driven by non-domestic sexual violence. Our study examined characteristics of women in eastern Ukraine receiving psychosocial services following sexual violence compared to survivors of other forms of gender-based violence. Methods: Intake data collected between February 2016 and June 2017 by psychosocial service providers in five conflict-affected areas of Ukraine from women, aged 15–49, (N = 8525), was analyzed. Descriptive analysis and covariate adjusted logistic and negative binomial regressions were used to identify socioeconomic, incident and access to services factors associated with having experienced sexual violence compared to other forms of violence. Results: Among this sample of survivors receiving psychosocial services, 2.6% (n = 220) reported experiencing sexual violence. A majority of sexual violence acts reported were committed by non-domestic perpetrators (61.4%); followed by intimate partners (25.9%). Almost half of sexual violence cases occurred at home (49.1%). Experiencing sexual violence was positively associated with being younger, single and internally displaced, and negatively with engaging in unpaid labor, such as childcare. Women who experienced sexual violence delayed seeking care by 4 days compared to other gender-based violence survivors. Sexual violence survivors were less likely than physical violence survivors to have reported the incident prior to receiving care (adjusted odds ratio = 0.39; 95% confidence interval = 0.28–0.54). Conclusions: Non-domestic and intimate partner sexual violence were both prevalent in our sample. Compared to survivors disclosing other types of gender-based violence, sexual violence survivors appear to face unique barriers to reporting and accessing timely care. Prevention and outreach programs tailored to the specific vulnerabilities, such as displacement status, and needs of sexual violence survivors in conflict settings are urgently needed.

From the front lines of the global AIDS fight

Navario, P., & Whiteside, A.

Publication year

2010

Journal title

Global Health Magazine

HIV/AIDS in South Africa: Improved Prognosis

Navario, P.

Publication year

2010

Journal title

Foreign Affairs

Special report on the state of HIV/AIDS in South Africa. Global Health Magazine

Navario, P., Bekker, L. G., & Blecher, M.

Publication year

2010

Journal title

Global Health Magazine

Zimbabwe's second wave?

Navario, P.

Publication year

2010

Journal title

The Huffington Post

HIV Dollars: boon or black hole?

Navario, P.

Publication year

2009

Journal title

Foreign Affairs

Nutrition and HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa: An overview

Anabwani, G., & Navario, P.

Publication year

2005

Journal title

Nutrition

Volume

21

Issue

1

Page(s)

96-99
Abstract
Abstract
HIV/AIDS is most prevalent in Sub-Saharan Africa where, exacerbated by the presence of other common conditions such as malnutrition and opportunistic infections, it is wreaking devastation on families, communities, and nations. Just as epidemics vary by country, so do national responses to this complex emergency. This is illustrated by the cases of Botswana, South Africa, and Uganda. Nutritional and micronutrient deficiencies play an important additive role in immune degradation and impaired development in children. Careful implementation of antiretroviral drugs, complemented by simultaneous efforts to ensure proper nutrition among HIV-infected children and adults are essential components of an effective response to the HIV/AIDS pandemic in Africa and elsewhere.

Treatment and research options for paediatric HIV infection in South Africa: Towards improving care

Gray, C., Barker, P., Navario, P., Eley, B., Mufhandu, K., Tiemessen, C., & Meyers, T.

Publication year

2005

Journal title

Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine

Issue

20

Page(s)

42-44
Abstract
Abstract
This satellite meeting at the 2nd South African AIDS Conference was organised to facilitate and inspire paediatric networking opportunities within South Africa and Africa. The meeting was collaborative venture between recipients of the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation International Leadership Award (Clive Gray and Tammy Meyers), the African Network for the Care of Children Affected by AIDS (ANECCA) and the Institute of Healthcare Improvement (IHI). The treatment needs of many HIV-infected children in South Africa are not being met, the antiretrovial rollout for children lags behind that of adults, and there are many unanswered clinical and scientific questions that should be addressed by local researchers and scientists to improve paediatric care. The overall purpose of this satellite meeting was to introduce clinical and research networks that are working towards improving the care for HIV-infected children in Africa. More specifically, the objectives of the meeting were: ■ to promote awareness pf paediatric networks functioning in Africa ■ to link seemingly disparate areas of knowledge around treatment and research in immunology and health care, and ■ to facilitate networking through established African paediatric networks.

Election 2000: a new administration steps up to the plate.

Navario, P.

Publication year

2001

Journal title

IAPAC monthly

Volume

7

Issue

2

Page(s)

42-43

Medical marijuana: shifting the paradigm.

Navario, P.

Publication year

2001

Journal title

IAPAC monthly

Volume

7

Issue

3

Page(s)

76-79

Syringe exchange programs: why won't US leaders do the right thing?

Navario, P.

Publication year

2000

Journal title

IAPAC monthly

Volume

6

Issue

12

Contact

peter.navario@nyu.edu 708 Broadway 6FL New York, NY, 10003