Farzana Kapadia

Farzana Kapadia
Farzana Kapadia

Professor of Epidemiology

Vice Chair of Academic Affairs, Department of Epidemiology

Professional overview

Dr. Farzana Kapadia is Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health at the NYU School of Global Public Health and at the NYU Grossman School of Medicine, Department of Population Health. Dr. Kapadia is also affiliated with the Institute of Human Development and Social Change and Population Center at NYU.

Dr. Kapadia has long standing research interests in understanding the social and structural drivers of HIV/STIs as well as sexual and reproductive health outcomes in underserved and marginalized populations. Dr. Kapadia has over 20 years of experience in the design, development, and implementation of observational studies and HIV/STI intervention and prevention trials in underserved and marginalized populations in urban settings, both in the US and in Africa (Ghana and Kenya).

Dr. Kapadia has a passion for teaching and mentoring. She teaches the core Epidemiology for in-coming MPH students and has also taught key epidemiology courses, including Intermediate Epidemiology and Outbreak Epidemiology at GPH as well as an HIV-related course at NYU London. The overarching goal of Dr. Kapadia’s teaching is to train students to become epidemiologists and public health practitioners who are critical and creative thinkers as well as champions and advocates for inclusive solutions to our local and global public health challenges.

In addition to her research and teaching responsibilities, Dr. Kapadia serves as the Deputy Editor for the American Journal of Public Health.

Education

BS, Biology and History, SUNY Binghamton, Binghamton, NY
MPH, Community Public Health, New York University, New York, NY
PhD, Epidemiology, Columbia University, New York, NY

Honors and awards

Excellence in Public Health Faculty Award, New York University (2012)
Steinhardt Goddard Award (2011)
Community Collaborative Award, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development (2009)
Elected Member, American College of Epidemiology (2007)

Areas of research and study

Behavioral Determinants of Health
Behavioral Science
Epidemiology
HIV/AIDS
Reproductive Health
Social Behaviors
Social Determinants of Health
Social epidemiology
Substance Abuse

Publications

Publications

Environmental Justice From Pennsylvania to Paris: A Public Health of Consequence, January 2023

Kapadia, F. (n.d.).

Publication year

2023

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

113

Issue

1

Page(s)

12-14

Sustaining PrEP Prescriptions at a Safety-Net Hospital in New York City During COVID-19: Lessons Learned

Pitts, R. A., Ban, K., Greene, R. E., Kapadia, F., & Braithwaite, R. S. (n.d.).

Publication year

2023

Journal title

AIDS and Behavior
Abstract
Abstract
To understand the impact of COVID-19-related disruptions on PrEP services, we reviewed PrEP prescriptions at NYC Health + Hospitals/Bellevue from July 2019 through July 2021. PrEP prescriptions were examined as PrEP person-equivalents (PrEP PE) in order to account for the variable time of refill duration (i.e., 1–3 months). To assess “PrEP coverage”, we calculated PrEP medication possession ratios (MPR) while patients were under study observation. Pre-clinic closure, mean PrEP PE = 244.2 (IQR 189.2, 287.5; median = 252.5) were observed. Across levels of clinic closures, mean PrEP PE = 247.3, (IQR 215.5, 265.4; median = 219.9) during 100% clinic closure, 255.4 (IQR 224, 284.3; median = 249.0) during 80% closure, and 274.6 (IQR 273.0, 281.0; median = 277.2) during 50% closure were observed. Among patients continuously prescribed PrEP pre-COVID-19, the mean MPR mean declined from 83% (IQR 72–100%; median = 100%) to 63% (IQR 35–97%; median = 66%) after the onset of COVID-19. For patients newly initiated on PrEP after the onset of COVID-19, the mean MPR was 73% (IQR 41–100%; median = 100%). Our ability to sustain PrEP provisions, as measured by both PrEP PE and MPR, can likely be attributed to our pre-COVID-19 system for PrEP delivery, which emphasizes navigation, same-day initiation, and primary care integration. In the era of COVID-19 as well as future unforeseen healthcare disruptions, PrEP programs must be robust and flexible in order to sustain PrEP delivery.

Abortion Care Is Health Care: A Public Health of Consequence, September 2022

Kapadia, F. (n.d.).

Publication year

2022

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

112

Issue

9

Page(s)

1242-1244

Capturing missed HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis opportunities—sexually transmitted infection diagnoses in the emergency department

Mclaughlin, S. E., Kapadia, F., Greene, R. E., & Pitts, R. (n.d.).

Publication year

2022

Journal title

International Journal of STD and AIDS

Volume

33

Issue

3

Page(s)

242-246
Abstract
Abstract
The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) be considered for all patients diagnosed with a sexually transmitted infection (STI). Emergency departments (EDs) are an important site for diagnosis and treatment of STIs for under-served populations. Consequently, we identified 377 patients diagnosed with a bacterial sexually transmitted infection (gonorrhea, chlamydia, and/or syphilis) at a major New York City emergency department between 1/1/2014 and 7/30/2017 to examine associations between key sociodemographic characteristics and missed opportunities for PrEP provision. In this sample, 299 (79%) emergency department patients missed their medical follow-up 90 days after STI diagnosis, as recommended. Results from adjusted generalized estimating equation regression models indicate that patients >45 yo (aOR = 2.2, 95% CI 1.2–3.9) and those with a primary care provider in the hospital system (aOR = 6.8, 95% CI 3.8–12.0) were more likely to return for follow-up visits, whereas Black patients (aOR = 0.44, 95% CI 0.25–0.77) were less likely to return for follow-up visits. These findings indicate that lack of STI treatment follow-up visits are significantly missed opportunities for PrEP provision and comprehensive human immunodeficiency virus prevention care.

Chronic comorbidities in persons living with HIV within three years of exposure to antiretroviral therapy at Pantang Antiretroviral Center in Ghana: a retrospective study

Kotey, M., Alhassan, Y., Adomako, J., Nunoo-Mensah, G., Kapadia, F., & Sarfo, B. (n.d.).

Publication year

2022

Journal title

Pan African Medical Journal

Volume

42

Issue

294

Page(s)

1-21
Abstract
Abstract
Introduction: uptake of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and retention in care are associated with increased life expectancy but increased the risk of comorbid conditions in persons living with HIV (PLWH) and taking antiretroviral drugs. This study describes comorbid conditions among PLWH in Ghana. Methods: PLWH (n=222) out of a sample population of 900, randomly selected at Pantang ART Center participated in the study from June to July of 2020. Socio-demographic characteristics, HIV biomarkers, medication type and adherence, and diagnostic confirmed chronic conditions were extracted from medical records of PLWH. Cox proportional-hazard models and Kaplan-Meier curves graphing risk of experiencing comorbid conditions were performed. Log-rank test was performed at p<0.05. Results: fifty three point two percent of PLWH (222) experienced a comorbid condition including, respiratory conditions (17.6%), anaemia (12.2%), hypertension (12.2%), cardiovascular diseases (10.8%),and neurological conditions (10.8%).Factors associated with some of these conditions were medication adherence (aHR=0.43, 95% CI: 0.21-0.90) and visual changes (aHR=2.64, 95% CI: 1.08-6.45) for respiratory conditions, age (aHR=10.03, 95% CI; 1.22-82.37) for hypertension, and World Health Organization (WHO) clinical stages (stage II (aHR=13.36, 95% CI=1.54-115.63) and III (aHR=11.71, 95% CI=1.41-97.26))for peripheral neuropathy. Kaplan-Meier curves show significant risk of comorbid conditions for age, CD4 count ≤350 cells/mm³, WHO clinical stages III and IV, and ART non-adherence. Conclusion: understanding the types of comorbidities in PLWH is integral to providing feedback to primary care providers to monitor.

Editorial Note

Kapadia, F. (n.d.). In American journal of public health.

Publication year

2022

Volume

112

Issue

2

Page(s)

e2-e3

Ending Homelessness and Advancing Health Equity: A Public Health of Consequence, March 2022

Kapadia, F. (n.d.).

Publication year

2022

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

112

Issue

3

Page(s)

372-373

Food Insecurity, Financial Hardship, and Mental Health among Multiple Asian American Ethnic Groups: Findings from the 2020 COVID-19 Household Impact Survey

Islam, J. Y., Awan, I., & Kapadia, F. (n.d.).

Publication year

2022

Journal title

Health Equity

Volume

6

Issue

1

Page(s)

435-447
Abstract
Abstract
Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has adversely impacted the financial and mental well-being of U.S. adults, however, Asian American (AA)-specific data are lacking, particularly disaggregated by AA ethnicity. Our objective was to evaluate food insecurity (FI), financial hardship, and mental health among disaggregated AA ethnic groups during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: We used data from the COVID-19 Household Impact Survey, a sample of 10,760 U.S. adults weighted to reflect the U.S. population (weighted n: 418,209,893). AA ethnic categories were based on self-report (n=312, 5.1%; weighted n: 21,143,079) and provided as follows: Chinese American, South Asian, Filipino+Vietnamese, and Japanese+Korean. We estimated the prevalence of FI and financial hardship across AA ethnic categories. We estimated the demographic determinants of FI, including financial hardship, among AA adults using multivariable Poisson regression. We calculated the prevalence of mental health symptoms among food-insecure AA adults, as well as among AA adults experiencing both FI and financial hardship. Results: Overall, the prevalence of FI and financial hardship among AA adults was highest among Filipino+Vietnamese adults (52.9-24.5%) and lowest among Japanese+Korean adults (13.9-8.6%). Determinants of FI among AA adults included Filipino+Vietnamese ethnicity (adjusted prevalence ratios [aPR]: 2.81, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.49-5.29), being widowed/divorced/separated (aPR: 3.14, 95% CI: 1.37-7.23), high school graduate only (aPR: 3.46, 95% CI: 1.96-6.11), having low income <$30,000 (aPR: 2.54, 95% CI: 1.27-5.06), and living in rural areas (aPR: 7.65, 95% CI: 1.17-50.14). Eighty-one percent and 63% of AA adults with anxiety and hopelessness at least 3-7 days/week, respectively, were food insecure and experiencing financial hardship. Conclusion: Disparities exist in FI and financial hardship among AA adults, particularly Filipino+Vietnamese adults, and are associated with increased self-reporting of feelings of anxiety and hopelessness.

Gun Control for Health: A Public Health of Consequence, December 2022

Kapadia, F. (n.d.).

Publication year

2022

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

112

Issue

12

Page(s)

1710-1712

Incarceration, Social Support Networks, and Health among Black Sexual Minority Men and Transgender Women: Evidence from the HPTN 061 Study

Scheidell, J. D., Kapadia, F., Turpin, R. E., Mazumdar, M., Dyer, T. V., Feelemyer, J., Cleland, C. M., Brewer, R., Parker, S. D., Irvine, N. M., Remch, M., Mayer, K. H., & Khan, M. R. (n.d.).

Publication year

2022

Journal title

International journal of environmental research and public health

Volume

19

Issue

19
Abstract
Abstract
Support from social networks buffers against negative effects of stress but is disrupted by incarceration. Few studies examine incarceration, social support networks, and health among Black sexual minority men (BSMM) and Black transgender women (BTW). We conducted a secondary analysis using HIV Prevention Trials Network 061 (HPTN 061), a sample of BSMM/BTW recruited from six US cities. We measured associations between recent incarceration reported at six months follow-up and social support networks at twelve months follow-up, and cross-sectional associations between support networks and twelve-month health outcomes (e.g., sexual partnerships, substance use, healthcare access and depressive symptoms). Among the analytic sample (N = 1169), recent incarceration was associated with small medical support networks (adjusted risk ratio [aRR] 1.16, 95% CI 1.01, 1.34) and small financial support networks (aRR 1.18, 95% CI 1.04, 1.35). Support networks were associated with multiple partnerships (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] 0.77, 95% CI 0.65, 0.90), unhealthy alcohol use (aPR 1.20, 95% CI 0.96, 1.51), and depressive symptoms (aPR 1.16, 95% CI 0.99, 1.36). Incarceration adversely impacts social support networks of BSMM/BTW, and support networks were associated with a range of important health outcomes.

Monkeypox, After HIV/AIDS and COVID-19: Suggestions for Collective Action and a Public Health of Consequence, November 2022

Landers, S., Kapadia, F., & Tarantola, D. (n.d.).

Publication year

2022

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

112

Issue

11

Page(s)

1564-1566

Predictors of Anal High-Risk HPV Infection Across Time in a Cohort of Young Adult Sexual Minority Men and Transgender Women in New York City, 2015–2020

LoSchiavo, C., D’Avanzo, P. A., Emmert, C., Krause, K. D., Ompad, D. C., Kapadia, F., & Halkitis, P. N. (n.d.).

Publication year

2022

Journal title

American Journal of Men's Health

Volume

16

Issue

4
Abstract
Abstract
Cisgender sexual minority men (SMM) and transgender women are disproportionately vulnerable to HPV-related anal cancer, but little is known about longitudinal predictors of high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) infection in this population. As such, this analysis aims to identify factors associated with incident anal hrHPV infection in a diverse cohort of young SMM and transgender women. This study of HPV infection, nested within a larger cohort study, took place between October 2015 and January 2020. Participants completed a brief computer survey assessing HPV symptomatology, risk, and prevention alongside multi-site testing, in addition to biannual cohort study assessments. In the analytic sample of 137 participants, 31.6% tested positive for an anal hrHPV infection, with 27.0% and 29.9% testing positive for incident anal hrHPV infections at Visits 2 and 3, respectively. When adjusting for time between study visits, participants had significantly greater odds of incident anal hrHPV at Visit 2 if they had a concurrent HSV infection (AOR = 5.08 [1.43, 18.00]). At Visit 3, participants had significantly greater odds of incident anal hrHPV infection if they reported a greater number of sex partners in the previous month (AOR = 1.25 [1.03, 1.51]). Prevalence of cancer-causing HPV at baseline was high and many participants tested positive for additional types of anal hrHPV at subsequent visits. Risk for newly detected anal hrHPV infection was significantly associated with biological and behavioral factors. Our findings strongly indicate a need for programs to increase uptake of HPV vaccination and provide HPV-related health education for sexual and gender minorities.

Reproductive Justice Matters: A Public Health of Consequence, August 2022

Kapadia, F. (n.d.).

Publication year

2022

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

112

Issue

8

Page(s)

1107-1109

SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT AND MENTAL HEALTH SYMPTOMS ACROSS ASIAN AMERICAN ETHNIC GROUPS DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

Islam, J. Y., Awan, I., & Kapadia, F. (n.d.).

Publication year

2022

Journal title

Ethnicity and Disease

Volume

32

Issue

2

Page(s)

131-144
Abstract
Abstract
Background: To examine social engagement and mental health symptoms during the COVID-19 pandemic across Asian American (AA) ethnic groups. Methods: Data from three waves of the nationally representative COVID-19 Household Impact Survey (4/20/2020-6/8/2020) were used to describe social engagement and mental health symptoms during the pandemic. Associations between mental health and social engagement were assessed via multinomial logistic regression. Results: In this sample of 312 AAs (36.9% Chinese American, 30.9% South Asian American, 20.1% Filipino/Vietnamese American, and 12.0% Japanese/Korean American), daily communication with neighbors declined for Chinese, South Asian and Filipino/Vietnamese Americans but increased for Japanese/Korean Americans (P= .012) whereas communication with friends/family increased only for Filipino/Vietnamese, Japanese/Korean and South Asian Americans (P<0.001). Differences in self-reported symptoms of anxiety, depression, loneliness, and hopelessness were observed across AA ethnic groups. In adjusted models, lower social engagement was associated with frequent (3-4 days/week) depressive symptoms during the preceding week (cOR:3.26, 95%CI:1.01-10.5). This association was heightened for Asian men (cOR:14.22, 95%CI:3.62-55.8). Conclusions: Heterogeneity of social engagement and mental health symptoms across AA ethnicities was observed. Understanding associations between social engagement and mental health within different communities is necessary to provide culturally and linguistically appropriate mental health treatment and care.

Structural Interventions That Reduce HIV Vulnerability: A Public Health of Consequence, June 2022

Kapadia, F. (n.d.).

Publication year

2022

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

112

Issue

6

Page(s)

826-827

Supporting Local Public Health Departments: A Public Health of Consequence, January 2022

Kapadia, F. (n.d.).

Publication year

2022

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

112

Issue

1

Page(s)

12-13

The Future of the Public Health Data Dashboard

Dasgupta, N., & Kapadia, F. (n.d.).

Publication year

2022

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

112

Issue

6

Page(s)

886-888

The Global Opioid Overdose Crisis

De Camargo, K. R., & Kapadia, F. (n.d.).

Publication year

2022

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

112

Page(s)

S93

Vaccine Solidarity Requires Social Justice: A Public Health of Consequence, February 2022

Kapadia, F. (n.d.).

Publication year

2022

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

112

Issue

2

Page(s)

202-203

Violence and the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Public Health of Consequence, May 2022

Kapadia, F. (n.d.).

Publication year

2022

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

112

Issue

5

Page(s)

706-708

1981-2021: HIV and Our World

Landers, S., Kapadia, F., & Bowleg, L. (n.d.).

Publication year

2021

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

111

Issue

7

Page(s)

1180-1182

All Not Quiet (but Quite Well) on the AJPH Bibliometric Front

Costanza, M. C., & Kapadia, F. (n.d.).

Publication year

2021

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

111

Issue

2

Page(s)

173

Determinants of Intimate Partner Violence Among Young Men Who Have Sex With Men: The P18 Cohort Study

Stults, C. B., Javdani, S., Kapadia, F., & Halkitis, P. N. (n.d.).

Publication year

2021

Journal title

Journal of Interpersonal Violence

Volume

36

Issue

15

Page(s)

7018-7042
Abstract
Abstract
Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is an understudied health problem among young gay, bisexual, and other non-identified young men who have sex with men (YMSM). According to cross-sectional studies, IPV is associated with psychosocial and mental health problems, such as stigma and depression, among YMSM. IPV is also associated with health-risk behaviors, such as substance use, among this population. Yet, to date, no studies have used longitudinal data to examine determinants of IPV among YMSM. This gap in the extant literature is problematic, as it limits our understanding of how to intervene to interrupt cycles of violence. The aim of the present study was to examine longitudinal determinants of IPV among a sample of (N = 526) YMSM living in the New York City area. Longitudinal analyses using Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) were used to examine individual, relationship, mental health, psychosocial, and substance use factors in relation to IPV victimization and perpetration. Most notably, early experiences of IPV were a robust predictor of later experiences of IPV victimization and perpetration. Relationship status, depression, public gay-related stigma, and illicit substance use were associated with IPV victimization over time. Similarly, relationship status, depression, public gay-related stigma, marijuana, and other illicit substance were associated with IPV perpetration. These findings suggest that prevention programs and awareness campaigns should aim to reach YMSM before their first experiences of relationship violence, as these early experiences of violence are strongly linked to later experiences of violence. Also, IPV interventions should be tailored to the needs of YMSM and should target depressive symptoms, gay-related stigma, and substance use behaviors. Additionally, substance use interventions may be improved by addressing IPV. Finally, policymakers should support policies that improve the social climate for LGBTQ people, thereby reducing gay-related stigma, and potentially stemming violence against and among YMSM.

Racial and ethnic disparities in "stop-and-frisk" experience among young sexual minority men in New York City

Khan, M. R., Kapadia, F., Geller, A., Mazumdar, M., Scheidell, J. D., Krause, K. D., Martino, R. J., Cleland, C. M., Dyer, T. V., Ompad, D. C., & Halkitis, P. N. (n.d.).

Publication year

2021

Journal title

PloS one

Volume

16

Issue

8
Abstract
Abstract
Although racial/ethnic disparities in police contact are well documented, less is known about other dimensions of inequity in policing. Sexual minority groups may face disproportionate police contact. We used data from the P18 Cohort Study (Version 2), a study conducted to measure determinants of inequity in STI/HIV risk among young sexual minority men (YSMM) in New York City, to measure across-time trends, racial/ethnic disparities, and correlates of self-reported stop-and-frisk experience over the cohort follow-up (2014-2019). Over the study period, 43% reported stop-and-frisk with higher levels reported among Black (47%) and Hispanic/Latinx (45%) than White (38%) participants. Stop-and-frisk levels declined over follow-up for each racial/ethnic group. The per capita rates among P18 participants calculated based on self-reported stop-and-frisk were much higher than rates calculated based on New York City Police Department official counts. We stratified respondents' ZIP codes of residence into tertiles of per capita stop rates and observed pronounced disparities in Black versus White stop-and-frisk rates, particularly in neighborhoods with low or moderate levels of stop-and-frisk activity. YSMM facing the greatest economic vulnerability and mental disorder symptoms were most likely to report stop-and-frisk. Among White respondents levels of past year stop-and-frisk were markedly higher among those who reported past 30 day marijuana use (41%) versus those reporting no use (17%) while among Black and Hispanic/Latinx respondents stop-and-frisk levels were comparable among those reporting marijuana use (38%) versus those reporting no use (31%). These findings suggest inequity in policing is observed not only among racial/ethnic but also sexual minority groups and that racial/ethnic YSMM, who are at the intersection of multiple minority statuses, face disproportionate risk. Because the most socially vulnerable experience disproportionate stop-and-frisk risk, we need to reach YSMM with community resources to promote health and wellbeing as an alternative to targeting this group with stressful and stigmatizing police exposure.

Social Justice for Marginalized Communities

Borrell, L. N., & Kapadia, F. (n.d.).

Publication year

2021

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

111

Issue

8

Page(s)

1366

Contact

farzana.kapadia@nyu.edu 708 Broadway 7FL New York, NY, 10003