Farzana Kapadia

Farzana Kapadia
Farzana Kapadia

Vice Chair of Academic Affairs, Department of Epidemiology

Associate Professor of Epidemiology

Professional overview

Dr. Farzana Kapadia is Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health at the NYU School of Global Public Health and at the NYU Grossman School of Medicine, Department of Population Health. Dr. Kapadia is also affiliated with the Institute of Human Development and Social Change and Population Center at NYU.

Dr. Kapadia has long standing research interests in understanding the social and structural drivers of HIV/STIs as well as sexual and reproductive health outcomes in underserved and marginalized populations. Dr. Kapadia has over 20 years of experience in the design, development, and implementation of observational studies and HIV/STI intervention and prevention trials in underserved and marginalized populations in urban settings, both in the US and in Africa (Ghana and Kenya).

Dr. Kapadia has a passion for teaching and mentoring. She teaches the core Epidemiology for in-coming MPH students and has also taught key epidemiology courses, including Intermediate Epidemiology and Outbreak Epidemiology at GPH as well as an HIV-related course at NYU London. The overarching goal of Dr. Kapadia’s teaching is to train students to become epidemiologists and public health practitioners who are critical and creative thinkers as well as champions and advocates for inclusive solutions to our local and global public health challenges.

In addition to her research and teaching responsibilities, Dr. Kapadia serves as the Deputy Editor for the American Journal of Public Health.

Education

BS, Biology and History, SUNY Binghamton, Binghamton, NY
MPH, Community Public Health, New York University, New York, NY
PhD, Epidemiology, Columbia University, New York, NY

Honors and awards

Excellence in Public Health Faculty Award, New York University (2012)
Steinhardt Goddard Award (2011)
Community Collaborative Award, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development (2009)
Elected Member, American College of Epidemiology (2007)

Areas of research and study

Behavioral Determinants of Health
Behavioral Science
Epidemiology
HIV/AIDS
Reproductive Health
Social Behaviors
Social Determinants of Health
Social epidemiology
Substance Abuse

Publications

Publications

Capturing missed HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis opportunities—sexually transmitted infection diagnoses in the emergency department

Mclaughlin, S. E., Kapadia, F., Greene, R. E., & Pitts, R.

Publication year

2022

Journal title

International Journal of STD and AIDS

Volume

33

Issue

3

Page(s)

242-246
Abstract
Abstract
The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) be considered for all patients diagnosed with a sexually transmitted infection (STI). Emergency departments (EDs) are an important site for diagnosis and treatment of STIs for under-served populations. Consequently, we identified 377 patients diagnosed with a bacterial sexually transmitted infection (gonorrhea, chlamydia, and/or syphilis) at a major New York City emergency department between 1/1/2014 and 7/30/2017 to examine associations between key sociodemographic characteristics and missed opportunities for PrEP provision. In this sample, 299 (79%) emergency department patients missed their medical follow-up 90 days after STI diagnosis, as recommended. Results from adjusted generalized estimating equation regression models indicate that patients >45 yo (aOR = 2.2, 95% CI 1.2–3.9) and those with a primary care provider in the hospital system (aOR = 6.8, 95% CI 3.8–12.0) were more likely to return for follow-up visits, whereas Black patients (aOR = 0.44, 95% CI 0.25–0.77) were less likely to return for follow-up visits. These findings indicate that lack of STI treatment follow-up visits are significantly missed opportunities for PrEP provision and comprehensive human immunodeficiency virus prevention care.

Editorial Note

Kapadia, F. In American journal of public health.

Publication year

2022

Volume

112

Issue

2

Page(s)

e2-e3

Ending Homelessness and Advancing Health Equity: A Public Health of Consequence, March 2022

Kapadia, F.

Publication year

2022

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

112

Issue

3

Page(s)

372-373

Supporting Local Public Health Departments: A Public Health of Consequence, January 2022

Kapadia, F.

Publication year

2022

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

112

Issue

1

Page(s)

12-13

The Global Opioid Overdose Crisis

De Camargo, K. R., & Kapadia, F.

Publication year

2022

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

112

Page(s)

S93

Vaccine Solidarity Requires Social Justice: A Public Health of Consequence, February 2022

Kapadia, F.

Publication year

2022

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

112

Issue

2

Page(s)

202-203

Violence and the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Public Health of Consequence, May 2022

Kapadia, F.

Publication year

2022

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

112

Issue

5

Page(s)

706-708

1981-2021: HIV and Our World

Landers, S., Kapadia, F., & Bowleg, L.

Publication year

2021

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

111

Issue

7

Page(s)

1180-1182

All Not Quiet (but Quite Well) on the AJPH Bibliometric Front

Costanza, M. C., & Kapadia, F.

Publication year

2021

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

111

Issue

2

Page(s)

173

Determinants of Intimate Partner Violence Among Young Men Who Have Sex With Men: The P18 Cohort Study

Racial and ethnic disparities in "stop-and-frisk" experience among young sexual minority men in New York City

Khan, M. R., Kapadia, F., Geller, A., Mazumdar, M., Scheidell, J. D., Krause, K. D., Martino, R. J., Cleland, C. M., Dyer, T. V., Ompad, D. C., & Halkitis, P. N.

Publication year

2021

Journal title

PloS one

Volume

16

Issue

8
Abstract
Abstract
Although racial/ethnic disparities in police contact are well documented, less is known about other dimensions of inequity in policing. Sexual minority groups may face disproportionate police contact. We used data from the P18 Cohort Study (Version 2), a study conducted to measure determinants of inequity in STI/HIV risk among young sexual minority men (YSMM) in New York City, to measure across-time trends, racial/ethnic disparities, and correlates of self-reported stop-and-frisk experience over the cohort follow-up (2014-2019). Over the study period, 43% reported stop-and-frisk with higher levels reported among Black (47%) and Hispanic/Latinx (45%) than White (38%) participants. Stop-and-frisk levels declined over follow-up for each racial/ethnic group. The per capita rates among P18 participants calculated based on self-reported stop-and-frisk were much higher than rates calculated based on New York City Police Department official counts. We stratified respondents' ZIP codes of residence into tertiles of per capita stop rates and observed pronounced disparities in Black versus White stop-and-frisk rates, particularly in neighborhoods with low or moderate levels of stop-and-frisk activity. YSMM facing the greatest economic vulnerability and mental disorder symptoms were most likely to report stop-and-frisk. Among White respondents levels of past year stop-and-frisk were markedly higher among those who reported past 30 day marijuana use (41%) versus those reporting no use (17%) while among Black and Hispanic/Latinx respondents stop-and-frisk levels were comparable among those reporting marijuana use (38%) versus those reporting no use (31%). These findings suggest inequity in policing is observed not only among racial/ethnic but also sexual minority groups and that racial/ethnic YSMM, who are at the intersection of multiple minority statuses, face disproportionate risk. Because the most socially vulnerable experience disproportionate stop-and-frisk risk, we need to reach YSMM with community resources to promote health and wellbeing as an alternative to targeting this group with stressful and stigmatizing police exposure.

Social Justice for Marginalized Communities

Borrell, L. N., & Kapadia, F.

Publication year

2021

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

111

Issue

8

Page(s)

1366

Was Your Copy of AJPH Late?

Benjamin, G. C., Morabia, A., & Kapadia, F.

Publication year

2021

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

111

Issue

10

Page(s)

1710

Dental radiographs for age estimation in us asylum seekers: Methodological, ethical, and health issues

Kapadia, F., Stevens, J., & Silver, D.

Publication year

2020

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

110

Issue

12

Page(s)

1786-1789
Abstract
Abstract
Unaccompanied migrant children seeking asylum status in the United States are often forced to undergo dental radiographs, or x-rays, to verify that they are younger than 18 years. The application of third molar dental radiographs is methodologically flawed and should not be employed as a determinant of chronological age. Furthermore, the use of such tests without obtaining informed consent from either the youth or an objective advocate is unethical. Finally, the legal and health consequences of these inappropriately applied tests are severe and jeopardize the safety and security of these vulnerable minors.

Ending the HIV Epidemic: Getting to Zero AND Staying at Zero

Kapadia, F., & Landers, S.

Publication year

2020

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

110

Issue

1

Page(s)

15-16

Healthcare experiences of urban young adult lesbians

Griffin, M., Jaiswal, J., Krytusa, D., Krause, K. D., Kapadia, F., & Halkitis, P. N.

Publication year

2020

Journal title

Women's Health

Volume

16
Abstract
Abstract
Purpose: This cross-sectional study of young adult lesbians explores their healthcare experiences including having a primary care provider, forgone care, knowledge of where to obtain Pap testing, and sexually transmitted infection testing. Methods: Quantitative surveys were conducted at lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender venues and events with a sample of 100 young adult lesbians in New York City between June and October 2016. Using the Andersen model of healthcare access, this study examined associations between sociodemographic characteristics and healthcare experiences using multivariable logistic regression models. Results: Having a primary care provider was associated with having health insurance (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 4.9, p < 0.05). Both insurance (AOR = 0.2, p < 0.05) and employment (AOR = 0.2, p < 0.05) status were protective against foregone care among young adult lesbians. Disclosure of sexual orientation to a provider improved knowledge of where to access Pap testing (AOR = 7.5, p < 0.05). Disclosure of sexual orientation to friends and family improved knowledge of where to access sexually transmitted infection testing (AOR = 3.6, p < 0.05). Conclusion: Socioeconomic factors are significantly associated with healthcare access among young adult lesbians in New York City. Maintaining non-discrimination protections for both healthcare services and insurance coverage are important for this population. In addition, financial subsidies that lower the cost of health insurance coverage may also help improve healthcare access among young adult lesbians.

Healthcare usage and satisfaction among young adult gay men in New York city

Griffin, M., Cahill, S., Kapadia, F., & Halkitis, P. N.

Publication year

2020

Journal title

Journal of Gay and Lesbian Social Services

Volume

32

Issue

4

Page(s)

531-551
Abstract
Abstract
Satisfaction greatly impacts decisions about where and how to access healthcare. This cross-sectional study uses data gathered from young adult gay men in New York City. Findings indicate that participants who experienced discrimination in a healthcare setting were less likely to prefer coordinated healthcare. Participants who disclosed their sexual orientation and were comfortable discussing sexual activity with their provider were more likely to agree that their healthcare needs were adequately addressed. The healthcare system does not fully address the healthcare needs of gay men. Preferences for coordination of care, nondisclosure of sexual orientation, and low levels of satisfaction with services further discourage healthcare usage among this population.

Misinformation, Gendered Perceptions, and Low Healthcare Provider Communication Around HPV and the HPV Vaccine Among Young Sexual Minority Men in New York City: The P18 Cohort Study

Jaiswal, J., LoSchiavo, C., Maiolatesi, A., Kapadia, F., & Halkitis, P. N.

Publication year

2020

Journal title

Journal of Community Health

Volume

45

Issue

4

Page(s)

702-711
Abstract
Abstract
Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection among adults in the United States, and can cause several types of cancer. This is of particular concern for sexual minority men, as their increased risk of HIV acquisition increases risk for HPV and HPV-associated cancers, particularly when coupled with low rates of HPV vaccination. As part of a larger study of the syndemic of HIV, substance use, and mental health among young sexual minority men in New York City, we sought to explore what sexual minority men know about HPV and the HPV vaccine, along with their experiences have been communicating about the virus and vaccine. We interviewed 38 young sexual minority men with diverse sociodemographic characteristics and identified three main themes: low knowledge about HPV infection and vaccination, highly gendered misconceptions about HPV only affecting women, and lack of communication from healthcare providers about HPV. The prevalence of incorrect HPV knowledge, coupled with inadequate education and vaccination in healthcare settings, indicates a missed opportunity for HPV prevention in a high-risk and high-need population.

Predicting trajectories of substance use during emerging adulthood: Exploring the benefits of group-based trajectory modeling for zero-inflated outcomes

Response to: Fernández-Huerta et al. Re: Abbott et al., A Case of Rectal Ureaplasma Infection and Implications for Testing in Young Men Who Have Sex with Men: The P18 Cohort Study (From: Fernández-Huerta M, Serra-Pladevall J, Esperalba J, et al. LGBT Health 2020;7:119-120; DOI: 10.1089/lgbt.2019.0211)

Greene, R. E., Abbott, C. E., Kapadia, F., & Halkitis, P. N. In LGBT health.

Publication year

2020

Volume

7

Issue

2

Page(s)

121

The public health of pleasure: Going beyond disease prevention

Landers, S., & Kapadia, F.

Publication year

2020

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

110

Issue

2

Page(s)

140-141

50 years after stonewall, the LGBTQ health movement embodies empowerment, expertise, and energy

Landers, S., & Kapadia, F.

Publication year

2019

Journal title

American journal of public health

Volume

109

Issue

6

Page(s)

849-850

Access to Health Services Among Young Adult Gay Men in New York City

Griffin-Tomas, M., Cahill, S., Kapadia, F., & Halkitis, P. N.

Publication year

2019

Journal title

American Journal of Men's Health

Volume

13

Issue

1
Abstract
Abstract
This research is a cross-sectional study of young adult gay men (YAGM), ages 18 to 29, that aims to understand their health-care access including: having a primary care provider (PCP), frequency of health-care visits, and instances of foregone health care. Surveys were conducted with a modified time-space sample of 800 YAGM in New York City (NYC). Surveys were conducted between November 2015 and June 2016. This study examined associations between sociodemographic characteristics and health-care access using multivariable logistic regression models. In multivariable logistic regression models, there were higher odds of having a PCP among participants enrolled in school (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 1.85, 95% CI [1.18, 2.91], p <.01) and covered by insurance (AOR = 21.29, 95% CI [11.77, 38.53], p <.001). Modeling indicated higher odds of more than one health visit in the past 12 months for non-White participants (AOR = 2.27, 95% CI [1.43, 3.63], p <.001), those covered by insurance (AOR = 3.10, 95% CI [1.06, 9.04], p <.05), and those who disclosed their sexual orientation to their PCP (AOR = 2.99, 95% CI [1.58, 5.69], p <.001). Participants with insurance were less likely to report instances of foregone care (AOR = 0.21, 95% CI [0.21, 0.13], p <.001). Understanding the facilitators and barriers to health-care access among YAGM populations is of critical importance, as many YAGM between the ages of 18 and 29 are establishing their access to health care without parental guidance. Health-care access, including the decision to forego care, can represent a missed opportunity for primary prevention and early diagnosis of health issues, as well as more effective, less invasive, and less costly treatments.

Human Papillomavirus Vaccination and Infection in Young Sexual Minority Men: The P18 Cohort Study

Halkitis, P. N., Valera, P., Loschiavo, C. E., Goldstone, S. E., Kanztanou, M., Maiolatesi, A. J., Ompad, D. C., Greene, R. E., & Kapadia, F.

Publication year

2019

Journal title

AIDS patient care and STDs

Volume

33

Issue

4

Page(s)

149-156
Abstract
Abstract
We examined the prevalence of infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) and HIV in a cohort of young gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men [sexual minority men (SMM)]. HPV vaccination uptake was assessed; HIV antibody testing was performed and genetic testing for oral and anal HPV infection was undertaken. We examined both HPV vaccination and infection in relation to key demographic and structural variables. Participants (n = 486) were on average 23 years old; 70% identified as a member of a racial/ethnic minority group, and 7% identified as transgender females. Only 18.1% of the participants indicated having received the full dosage of HPV vaccination and 45.1% were unvaccinated. Slightly over half the participants (58.6%) were infected with HPV, with 58.1% testing positive for anal infection and 8.8% for oral infection. HIV seropositivity was associated with infection to oral HPV [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 4.03] and vaccine-preventable HPV, whereas both neighborhood-level poverty (AOR = 1.68) and HIV infection (AOR = 31.13) were associated with anal infection to HPV (AOR = 1.68). Prevalence of HPV infection is high among unvaccinated young SMM, despite the availability and eligibility for vaccination. HPV infection adds further health burden to these populations and is particularly concerning for those who are HIV positive as HIV infection increases the risk of developing HPV-related cancers. These findings underscore a missed prevention opportunity for an at-risk and underserved population and suggest the need for active strategies to increase HPV vaccination uptake in young SMM before the onset of sexual behavior.

Motivations for alcohol use to intoxication among young adult gay, bisexual, and other MSM in New York City: The P18 Cohort Study

Ristuccia, A., LoSchiavo, C., Kapadia, F., & Halkitis, P. N.

Publication year

2019

Journal title

Addictive Behaviors

Volume

89

Page(s)

44-50
Abstract
Abstract
Introduction: Motivations for alcohol use to intoxication vary among young adults depending on social setting and other contextual factors. However, there is limited research exploring the role of different drinking motivations among young men who have sex with men (YMSM). Methods: Data from a racially/ethnically and socioeconomically diverse sample of YMSM (n = 426) were used to examine associations between recent (last 30 days) alcohol use to intoxication and scores on three distinct drinking motivation subscales: convivial, intimate, and negative coping drinking. Multinomial logistic regression models were constructed to examine associations between drinking motivations and days of alcohol use to intoxication, controlling for sociodemographic characteristics. Results: YMSM who scored higher on all three drinking motivation subscales were more likely to engage in recent alcohol use to intoxication compared to those who reported no alcohol use to intoxication. In multivariable models, Black and Hispanic YMSM had lower odds of intoxication compared to White YMSM, and those reporting lower perceived familial SES had lower odds compared to higher SES. In a final model including all three motivations, only convivial drinking was significantly associated with days of intoxication (1–2 days: AOR = 1.22; 3+ days: AOR = 1.45). Conclusions: This study identifies distinct associations between different motivations for drinking and alcohol use to intoxication in a sample of YMSM. These findings highlight a need to incorporate an understanding of motivations for alcohol use to intoxication into research and clinical practice with YMSM, as different reasons for drinking carry respective potential health risks.