Ralph DiClemente

Ralph DiClemente
Ralph DiClemente

Chair of the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Associate Dean of Public Health Innovation

Professor of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Professional overview

Dr. Ralph DiClemente was trained as a Health Psychologist at the University of California, San Francisco where he received his PhD in 1984 after completing a ScM at the Harvard School of Public Health.  He earned his undergraduate degree at the City University of New York.

Dr. DiClemente’s research has four key foci:

  1. Developing interventions to reduce the risk of HIV/STD among vulnerable populations
  2. Developing interventions to enhance vaccine uptake among high-risk adolescents and women, such as HPV and influenza vaccine
  3. Developing implementation science interventions to enhance the uptake, adoption and sustainability of HIV/STD prevention programs in the community
  4. Developing diabetes screening and behavior change interventions to identify people with diabetes who are unaware of their disease status as well as reduce the risk of diabetes among vulnerable populations.

He has focused on developing intervention packages that blend community and technology-based approaches that are designed to optimize program effectiveness and enhance programmatic sustainability.

Dr. DiClemente is the author of ten CDC-defined, evidence-based interventions for adolescents and young African-American women and men. He is the author of more than 540 peer-review publications, 150 book chapters, and 21 books. He serves as a member of the Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council.

Previously, Dr. DiClemente served as the Charles Howard Candler Professor of Public Health at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University.  He was also Associate Director of the Center for AIDS Research, and was previously Chair of the Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education at the Rollins School of Public Health.

Dr. DiClemente is Past President of the Georgia chapter of the Society for Adolescent Health & Medicine.  He previously served as a member of the CDC Board of Scientific Counselors, and the NIMH Advisory Council.

Education

BA, The City College of the City University of New York (CCNY), New York, NY
ScM, Behavioral Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
PhD, Health Psychology, University of California San Francisco Center for Behavioral Sciences, San Francisco, CA
Postdoctoral Fellow, University of California, San Francisco, CA

Areas of research and study

Community Interventions
Diabetes
HIV/AIDS
Implementation science
Influenza
Psychology

Publications

Publications

A longitudinal examination of African American adolescent females detained for status offense

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An Exploratory Structural Equation Model of Stress-Related Experiences Among Justice-Involved Youth: A Gender Comparison

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Can a Multilevel STI/HIV Prevention Strategy for High Risk African American Adolescents Improve Life Satisfaction?

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Compassion Meditation Training for Hospital Chaplain Residents: A Pilot Study

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Developmental Changes in Sexual Risk and Substance Use Among African American Females: an Integrated Data Analysis Approach Using Time-varying Effect Models

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HIV/STI Service Delivery within Juvenile Community Supervision Agencies: A National Survey of Practices and Approaches to Moving High-Risk Youth through the HIV Care Cascade

Elkington, K. S., Robertson, A. A., Knight, D. K., Gardner, S. K., Funk, R. R., Dennis, M. L., Oser, C., & DIclemente, R.

Publication year

2020

Journal title

AIDS patient care and STDs

Volume

34

Issue

2

Page(s)

72-80
Abstract
Justice-involved youth (JIY) are at considerable risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but are disconnected from treatment and prevention. Juvenile justice agencies providing community supervision (CS) are well positioned to provide HIV prevention, testing, and prompt referral to treatment for JIY. However, we lack an understanding of juvenile CS agency responses to HIV/sexually transmitted infection (STI) needs among JIY. We conducted a nationwide systematic assessment of how juvenile CS agencies identify, refer, and move youth through the HIV care cascade using a nationally representative sample of 195 juvenile CS agencies across 20 states. Two-thirds of CS agencies did not offer any HIV-/STI-related services, and 82% reported no collaboration with health agencies. Screening or referral for HIV risk behaviors was reported by 32% of the CS agencies and 12% for any intervention or prevention for HIV/STI risk behaviors. Between 21% and 30% of agencies were unaware of the location of local HIV/STI services. HIV/STI prevention training was not a priority for directors and was ranked second to last out of 16 training topics. Agencies where staff expressed need for HIV risk training and where specific court programming was available were more likely to provide or refer for HIV/STI screening and/or testing. Agencies were more likely to provide or refer for services if they provided pre-trial/pre-adjudication supervision, parole, or court programming. Considering the low provision of HIV/STI-related services and limited collaboration between health and justice agencies, interventions that promote cross-system collaboration designed to minimize barriers and facilitate identification, referral, and linkage to HIV services for JIY are necessary.

Neighborhood Stress and Life Satisfaction: Is there a Relationship for African American Adolescents?

Valois, R. F., Kerr, J. C., Carey, M. P., Brown, L. K., Romer, D., DiClemente, R. J., & Vanable, P. A.

Publication year

2020

Journal title

Applied Research in Quality of Life

Volume

15

Issue

1

Page(s)

273-296
Abstract
This study identified associations between perceived neighborhood stress and adolescents’ perceptions of life satisfaction. African American adolescents aged 13–18 (n = 1658) from four matched, mid-sized cities in the northeastern and southeastern USA, completed a self-report questionnaire using an audio computer-assisted self-interview (ACASI). Analyses examined relationships between perceived neighborhood stress and perceived life satisfaction, while controlling for socioeconomic status (SES). Life satisfaction was found to be related to neighborhood stress for both males and females, with variability in neighborhood stress characteristics and in the magnitude of associations by gender. Further research should identify the particular characteristics of youth and specific aspects of adolescent life satisfaction associated with perceived neighborhood stress to develop community-based and culturally-sensitive quality of life improvement/health promotion programs.

A model for cognitively-based compassion training: theoretical underpinnings and proposed mechanisms

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A multilevel intervention with African American churches to enhance adoption of point-of-care HIV and diabetes testing, 2014-2018

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African-American sexual minority adolescents and sexual health disparities: An exploratory cross-sectional study

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An Examination of Gender Differences in Bullying among Justice-involved Adolescents

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Depressive Symptoms as a Longitudinal Predictor of Sexual Risk Behaviors Among African-American Adolescents

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Does Initiating Vaginal Sexual Intercourse During a Safer Sex Media Campaign Influence Life Satisfaction Among African American Adolescents?

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Evaluating the Role of Family Context Within a Randomized Adolescent HIV-Risk Prevention Trial

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Individual- and Community-Level Factors in the STD Status of Justice-Involved Youth: Multi-Group, Exploratory Two-Level Analysis

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Is the Brief Multidimensional Student’s Life Satisfaction Scale Valid and Reliable for African American Adolescents?

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Juvenile justice staff endorsement of HIV/STI prevention, testing, and treatment linkage

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Location of Pre-exposure Prophylaxis Services Across New York City Neighborhoods: Do Neighborhood Socio-demographic Characteristics and HIV Incidence Matter?

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Mental representation of self in relationships indirectly affects young Black women’s engagement in risky sexual behaviors through psychosocial HIV/STI risk factors

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Pregnancy Coercion as a Risk Factor for HIV and Other Sexually Transmitted Infections Among Young African American Women

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Prenatal and infancy nurse home visiting and 18-year outcomes of a randomized trial

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Problem Solving Reduces Sexual Risk Associated with Sensation Seeking, Substance Use, and Depressive Symptoms Among African-American Adolescents

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The Social and Behavioral Sciences Research Network: Shaping a Contemporary Agenda for Research in HIV

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When a relationship is imperative, will young women knowingly place their sexual health at risk? A sample of African American adolescent girls in the juvenile justice system

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КЛИНИЧЕСКИЕ И ЛИЧНОСТНЫЕ ХАРАКТЕРИСТИКИ ЖЕНЩИН С КОИНФЕКЦИЕЙ ВИЧ/ВГС, УПОТРЕБЛЕНИЕМ АЛКОГОЛЯ И НАРКОТИКОВ НА ЭТАПАХ ЗАБОЛЕВАНИЯ

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Contact

rjd438@nyu.edu +1 (212) 992-3709 715/719 Broadway New York, NY 10003