Ralph DiClemente

Ralph DiClemente
Ralph DiClemente

Chair of the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Associate Dean of Public Health Innovation

Professor of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Professional overview

Dr. Ralph DiClemente was trained as a Health Psychologist at the University of California, San Francisco where he received his PhD in 1984 after completing a ScM at the Harvard School of Public Health.  He earned his undergraduate degree at the City University of New York.

Dr. DiClemente’s research has four key foci:

  1. Developing interventions to reduce the risk of HIV/STD among vulnerable populations
  2. Developing interventions to enhance vaccine uptake among high-risk adolescents and women, such as HPV and influenza vaccine
  3. Developing implementation science interventions to enhance the uptake, adoption and sustainability of HIV/STD prevention programs in the community
  4. Developing diabetes screening and behavior change interventions to identify people with diabetes who are unaware of their disease status as well as reduce the risk of diabetes among vulnerable populations.

He has focused on developing intervention packages that blend community and technology-based approaches that are designed to optimize program effectiveness and enhance programmatic sustainability.

Dr. DiClemente is the author of ten CDC-defined, evidence-based interventions for adolescents and young African-American women and men. He is the author of more than 540 peer-review publications, 150 book chapters, and 21 books. He serves as a member of the Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council.

Previously, Dr. DiClemente served as the Charles Howard Candler Professor of Public Health at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University.  He was also Associate Director of the Center for AIDS Research, and was previously Chair of the Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education at the Rollins School of Public Health.

Dr. DiClemente is Past President of the Georgia chapter of the Society for Adolescent Health & Medicine.  He previously served as a member of the CDC Board of Scientific Counselors, and the NIMH Advisory Council.

Education

BA, The City College of the City University of New York (CCNY), New York, NY
ScM, Behavioral Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
PhD, Health Psychology, University of California San Francisco Center for Behavioral Sciences, San Francisco, CA
Postdoctoral Fellow, University of California, San Francisco, CA

Areas of research and study

Community Interventions
Diabetes
HIV/AIDS
Implementation science
Influenza
Psychology

Publications

Publications

A model for cognitively-based compassion training: theoretical underpinnings and proposed mechanisms

Ash, M., Harrison, T., Pinto, M., DiClemente, R., & Negi, L. T.

Publication year

2021

Journal title

Social Theory and Health

Volume

19

Issue

1

Page(s)

43-67
Abstract
Abstract
Across cultures and belief systems, compassion is widely considered to be beneficial for the development of personal and social wellbeing. Research indicates that compassion-training programs have broad health benefits, but how and why compassion-training programs are effective is still relatively unknown. This paper describes the theoretical underpinnings of a specific compassion-training program, CBCT® (Cognitively-Based Compassion Training), and proposes an integrative model that draws on existing health behavior constructs to identify CBCT’s core components and hypothesizes their directionality and interaction. The model includes two primary categories of skill development: (1) intrapersonal skills leading to greater resiliency, and (2) interpersonal skills leading to greater compassion. It is hypothesized that these two pathways are mutually reinforcing and both contribute to greater wellbeing. This model provides a foundation for theory-driven research on the underlying mechanisms in CBCT training. An understanding of CBCT’s mechanisms is a critical step towards optimizing and personalizing the intervention to meet the needs of specific populations.

An Examination of Gender Differences in Bullying among Justice-involved Adolescents

Dembo, R., Krupa, J. M., Faber, J., DiClemente, R. J., Wareham, J., & Schmeidler, J.

Publication year

2021

Journal title

Deviant Behavior

Volume

42

Issue

2

Page(s)

268-287
Abstract
Abstract
Most studies of bullying rely on school-based samples of youth; however, a few studies of justice-involved populations suggest delinquent youth experience higher rates of bullying than youth in the general population. Little is known about gender differences in bullying among justice-involved youth. Using data from a Health Coach service project for justice-involve youth implemented at two intake facilities, 312 female and 857 male newly arrested youth were included in the current study. The current study sought to determine gender differences in prevalence rates of bullying involvement. Logistic regression was used to explore gender differences in how key covariates of demographic, risk factors, and traumatic experiences related to bullying. Rates of bullying experiences were higher for girls (35%) than boys (17%), and these rates were higher than rates reported in studies using general population or school-based samples. Analysis revealed differences in risk factors of bullying by gender. For both arrested girls and boys, depressive symptoms and sexual assault victimization increased the odds of bullying. Justice-involved youth are at greater risk of bullying and experience multiple problems. Holistic treatment and prevention strategies that recognize the co-occurrence of mental health symptoms, serious victimization, and substance abuse with bullying experiences are needed.

Behavioral counseling associated with STI prevention

DiClemente, R. J.

Publication year

2021

Journal title

Journal of Pediatrics

Volume

228

Page(s)

310-313

Causally Interpretable Meta-analysis: Application in Adolescent HIV Prevention

Barker, D. H., Dahabreh, I. J., Steingrimsson, J. A., Houck, C., Donenberg, G., DiClemente, R., & Brown, L. K.

Publication year

2021

Journal title

Prevention Science
Abstract
Abstract
Endowing meta-analytic results with a causal interpretation is challenging when there are differences in the distribution of effect modifiers among the populations underlying the included trials and the target population where the results of the meta-analysis will be applied. Recent work on transportability methods has described identifiability conditions under which the collection of randomized trials in a meta-analysis can be used to draw causal inferences about the target population. When the conditions hold, the methods enable estimation of causal quantities such as the average treatment effect and conditional average treatment effect in target populations that differ from the populations underlying the trial samples. The methods also facilitate comparison of treatments not directly compared in a head-to-head trial and assessment of comparative effectiveness within subgroups of the target population. We briefly describe these methods and present a worked example using individual participant data from three HIV prevention trials among adolescents in mental health care. We describe practical challenges in defining the target population, obtaining individual participant data from included trials and a sample of the target population, and addressing systematic missing data across datasets. When fully realized, methods for causally interpretable meta-analysis can provide decision-makers valid estimates of how treatments will work in target populations of substantive interest as well as in subgroups of these populations.

Changing the landscape of South Asian migrant health research by advancing second-generation immigrant health needs

Ali, S. H., Diclemente, R. J., & Parekh, N.

Publication year

2021

Journal title

Translational Behavioral Medicine

Volume

11

Issue

6

Page(s)

1295-1297
Abstract
Abstract
South Asian immigrants confront a growing non-communicable disease burden, a significant issue in countries such as the USA. While efforts have slowly begun to address South Asian migrant health, second-generation communities remain underserved and understudied despite facing many of the same non-communicable disease concerns. The aim of this commentary is to highlight unique health disparities contributing to the current South Asian migrant health status and identify pathways for further formative research needed to inform subsequent development, implementation, and evaluation of health interventions targeting this community. Extant peer-reviewed literature addressing second-generation South Asian health issues was used to identify key research pathways needed to address existing gaps. Specifically, we call for (a) enhancing targeted surveillance and recruitment in research and (b) collecting data to help characterize behavioral and cultural patterns that may contribute to disease onset and progression. Expanding research on second-generation South Asian migrant health may help to develop tailored and targeted interventions.

Computer-based alcohol reduction intervention for alcohol-using HIV/HCV co-infected Russian women in clinical care: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

DiClemente, R. J., Brown, J. L., Capasso, A., Revzina, N., Sales, J. M., Boeva, E., Gutova, L. V., Khalezova, N. B., Belyakov, N., & Rassokhin, V.

Publication year

2021

Journal title

Trials

Volume

22

Issue

1
Abstract
Abstract
Background: Russia has a high prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. In 2018, over one million persons were living with HIV (PLWH); over a third were women. A high proportion of HIV-infected women are co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), and many consume alcohol, which adversely affects HIV and HCV treatment and prognosis. Despite the triple epidemics of alcohol use, HIV and HCV, and the need for interventions to reduce alcohol use among HIV/HCV co-infected women, evidence-based alcohol reduction interventions for this vulnerable population are limited. To address this gap, we developed a clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of a computer-based intervention to reduce alcohol consumption among HIV/HCV co-infected women in clinical care. Methods: In this two-arm parallel randomized controlled trial, we propose to evaluate the efficacy of a culturally adapted alcohol reduction intervention delivered via a computer for HIV/HCV co-infected Russian women. The study population consists of women 21–45 years old with confirmed HIV/HCV co-infection who currently use alcohol. Intervention efficacy is assessed by a novel alcohol biomarker, ethyl glucuronide (EtG), and biomarkers of HIV and HCV disease progression. Women are randomized to trial conditions in a 1:1 allocation ratio, using a computer-generated algorithm to develop the assignment sequence and concealment of allocation techniques to minimize assignment bias. Women are randomized to either (1) the computer-based alcohol reduction intervention or (2) the standard-of-care control condition. We will use an intent-to-treat analysis and logistic and linear generalized estimating equations to evaluate intervention efficacy, relative to the standard of care, in enhancing the proportion of women with a laboratory-confirmed negative EtG at each research study visit over the 9-month follow-up period. Additional analyses will evaluate intervention effects on HIV (viral load and CD4+ levels) and HCV markers of disease progression (FibroScan). Discussion: The proposed trial design and analysis provides an appropriate conceptual and methodological framework to assess the efficacy of the computer-based intervention. We propose to recruit 200 participants. The intervention, if efficacious, may be an efficient and cost-effective alcohol reduction strategy that is scalable and can be readily disseminated and integrated into clinical care in Russia to reduce women’s alcohol consumption and enhance HIV/HCV prognosis. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03362476. Registered on 5 December 2017

Correlates of depression among Black girls exposed to violence

Waller, B., Quinn, C. R., Boyd, D., DiClemente, R., & Voisin, D. R.

Publication year

2021

Journal title

Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities
Abstract
Abstract
Depression rates for youth remanded to juvenile detention is double that of the general population and Black girls are especially vulnerable. A dearth of literature analyzes the factors that are correlated with depression among system-involved Black girls, ages 12–17 years old. We utilized personal agency to examine the relationship between risk factors (i.e., abuse history, and fear of condom negotiation) and protective factors (i.e., condom self-efficacy, and perceived social support) that might correlate with depression among Black girls exposed to violence. Findings indicate that fear of condom negotiation, abuse history and low condom self-efficacy are correlated with depressive symptomology while self-esteem and perceived social support are protective factors that may serve as a buffer against girls’ feelings of helplessness and hopelessness. The findings of this study suggest several implications for prevention and intervention efforts to reduce the depression-related risks among justice-involved Black females, including strategies that promote healing within their social support networks.

Examining Mother-Reported Poor Sleep and Blood Pressure in Black/African American Mother-Child Dyads

Robbins, R., DiClemente, R. J., Ejikeme, C., Crusto, C. A., & Taylor, J.

Publication year

2021

Journal title

The Journal of cardiovascular nursing

Volume

36

Issue

2

Page(s)

116-123
Abstract
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Poor sleep is a confirmed risk factor for hypertension (HTN), and Black/African American (AA) women have among the highest rates of HTN in the United States. OBJECTIVE: We examined the relationship between sleep and blood pressure (BP) among Black/AA mother-child dyads using data from the Intergenerational Impact of Genetic and Psychological Factors on Blood Pressure study. METHODS: Data for this study were derived from 250 Black/AA mother-child dyads from low-income neighborhoods, collected via 4 home visits over 2 years. Mothers reported poor sleep, including reports of sleeping worse than usual and nighttime awakenings. Recordings of BP were obtained for mother and child. Mother BP was scored as normal (<120/<80 mm Hg), elevated (120-129/<80 mm Hg), stage 1 HTN (130-139/80-89 mm Hg), or stage 2 HTN (systolic ≥140 or diastolic ≥90 mm Hg). Generalized linear models examined the relationships between mother-reported poor sleep variables and both mother and child BP. Adjusted models examining mother BP controlled for the mother's age, education, marital status, smoking, body mass index, and depression symptoms. RESULTS: In adjusted models, nighttime awakenings were associated with stage 2 HTN (b = 2.70, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54-4.86, P < .05). Compared with children whose mother who had normal BP, children whose mother had elevated BP had higher diastolic BP (b = 0.37; 95% CI, 0.19-0.54; P < .001). Mother elevated BP was associated with both child systolic BP (b = 2.49; 95% CI, 0.44-4.53; P < .05) and diastolic BP (b = 2.07; 95% CI, 0.39-3.76; P < .05). Mother stage 1 HTN was associated with both child systolic BP (b = 2.16; 95% CI, 0.29-4.03; P < .05) and diastolic BP (b = 3.91; 95% CI, 2.40-5.42; P < .001). We detected a significant interaction between mother stage 2 HTN and mother nighttime awakenings in predicting higher child diastolic BP (b = 8.16; 95% CI, 0.65-15.68; P < .05). CONCLUSIONS: We found evidence for an association between mothers' nighttime awakenings and very high BP. Our study also illuminated a strong relationship between high mother BP and high child BP. Finally, our study found preliminary support for the potentially mediating role of mothers' nighttime awakenings in predicting the relationship between mother stage 2 HTN and child BP.

Factors associated with phosphatidylethanol (PEth) sensitivity for detecting unhealthy alcohol use: An individual patient data meta-analysis

Hahn, J. A., Murnane, P. M., Vittinghoff, E., Muyindike, W. R., Emenyonu, N. I., Fatch, R., Chamie, G., Haberer, J. E., Francis, J. M., Kapiga, S., Jacobson, K., Myers, B., Couture, M. C., DiClemente, R. J., Brown, J. L., So-Armah, K., Sulkowski, M., Marcus, G. M., Woolf-King, S., Cook, R. L., Richards, V. L., Molina, P., Ferguson, T., Welsh, D., Piano, M. R., Phillips, S. A., Stewart, S., Afshar, M., Page, K., McGinnis, K., Fiellin, D. A., Justice, A. C., Bryant, K., & Saitz, R.

Publication year

2021

Journal title

Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research

Volume

45

Issue

6

Page(s)

1166-1187
Abstract
Abstract
Background: Objective measurement of alcohol consumption is important for clinical care and research. Adjusting for self-reported alcohol use, we conducted an individual participant data (IPD) meta-analysis to examine factors associated with the sensitivity of phosphatidylethanol (PEth), an alcohol metabolite, among persons self-reporting unhealthy alcohol consumption. Methods: We identified 21 eligible studies and obtained 4073 observations from 3085 participants with Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test—Consumption (AUDIT-C) positive scores (≥3 for women and ≥4 for men) and PEth measurements. We conducted 1-step IPD meta-analysis using mixed effects models with random intercepts for study site. We examined the associations between demographic (sex, race/ethnicity, and age) and biologic (body mass index—BMI, hemoglobin, HIV status, liver fibrosis, and venous versus finger-prick blood collection) variables with PEth sensitivity (PEth≥8 ng/ml), adjusting for the level of self-reported alcohol use using the AUDIT-C score. Results: One third (31%) of participants were women, 32% were African, 28% African American, 28% White, and 12% other race/ethnicity. PEth sensitivity (i.e., ≥8 ng/ml) was 81.8%. After adjusting for AUDIT-C, we found no associations of sex, age, race/ethnicity, or method of blood collection with PEth sensitivity. In models that additionally included biologic variables, those with higher hemoglobin and indeterminate and advanced liver fibrosis had significantly higher odds of PEth sensitivity; those with higher BMI and those living with HIV had significantly lower odds of PEth sensitivity. African Americans and Africans had higher odds of PEth sensitivity than whites in models that included biologic variables. Conclusions: Among people reporting unhealthy alcohol use, several biological factors (hemoglobin, BMI, liver fibrosis, and HIV status) were associated with PEth sensitivity. Race/ethnicity was associated with PEth sensitivity in some models but age, sex, and method of blood collection were not. Clinicians should be aware of these factors, and researchers should consider adjusting analyses for these characteristics where possible.

Heavy Alcohol Use is Associated with Lower CD4 Counts among Russian Women Living with HIV: A Multilevel Analysis

Capasso, A., Brown, J. L., Safonova, P., Belyakov, N., Rassokhin, V., & DiClemente, R. J.

Publication year

2021

Journal title

AIDS and Behavior
Abstract
Abstract
Alcohol use remains prevalent among Russian women with HIV infection. Multilevel mixed effects models were used to estimate the association of heavy drinking and HIV outcomes among women (N = 250 at baseline; N = 207 at follow-up), aged 18–35, engaged in HIV care in Saint Petersburg. Alcohol use was assessed at baseline and 3 months by self-report and by the biomarker phosphatidylethanol (PEth). Overall, 35% of women were heavy drinkers, defined as women reporting ≥ 1 past-30-day heavy drinking episode (≥ 4 standard drinks on one occasion) or with PEth blood levels ≥ 80 ng/mL. Women who engaged in heavy drinking had an average 41 CD4 cells/mm3 (95% CI = − 81, − 2; z = − 2.04; P = 0.042) fewer than those who did not. Heavy drinking was associated with higher HIV symptom burden (IRR = 1.20; 95% CI = 1.05, 1.36; z = 2.73; P = 0.006) and suboptimal antiretroviral adherence (OR = 3.04; 95% CI = 1.27, 7.28; χ2 = 2.50; P = 0.013), but not with viral load. Findings support the integration of alcohol treatment interventions as part of routine HIV care in Russia.

Heterogeneity of Sexual Risk Profiles Among Juvenile Justice-Involved African American Girls

Logan-Greene, P., Bascug, E. W., DiClemente, R. J., & Voisin, D. R.

Publication year

2021

Journal title

Child and Youth Care Forum

Volume

50

Issue

4

Page(s)

653-677
Abstract
Abstract
Background: Juvenile justice-involved African American girls are considered uniformly high-risk for adverse sexual health outcomes such as sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and pregnancy; however, their sexual health statuses may be more complex. Objective: The present study assessed whether diverse subgroups of sexual risk exist and explored variations by socio-contextual indicators and sexual health outcomes. Method: The sample consisted of 188 detained African American adolescent girls. Six key sexual risk model indicators were selected for latent class analysis: early sex initiation, unprotected sex, high number of sex partners, sex while intoxicated, having sex with a recently incarcerated partner, and trading sex. Results: Results revealed a four-class solution: “Lowest Risk” (40.3%), with relatively low endorsement of sexual risk items; “Precocious Debut” (19.5%), with early sexual initiation and highest number of sex partners; “Delayed Risk” (30.3%), with later sexual debut but elevated unprotected sex and number of sex partners; and “Highest Risk” (9.9%), with the highest proportions on most indicators, but lower numbers of sex partners compared to Precocious Debut. Classes differed significantly on sexual health outcomes and demographic, neighborhood, peer, family, and individual factors. High Risk, Precocious Debut, and Delayed Risk were associated with greater prevalence of STIs. Lowest Risk and Precocious Debut classes had fewer prior pregnancies. Lowest Risk girls were significantly lower on a range of risk outcomes. Conclusions: Heterogeneous profiles of sexual risk may inform future prevention and interventions for at-risk or detained African American girls.

Horizons and Group Motivational Enhancement Therapy: HIV Prevention for Alcohol-Using Young Black Women, a Randomized Experiment

DiClemente, R. J., Rosenbaum, J. E., Rose, E. S., Sales, J. M., Brown, J. L., Renfro, T. L., Bradley, E. L., Davis, T. L., Capasso, A., Wingood, G. M., Liu, Y., West, S. G., Hardin, J. W., Bryan, A. D., & Feldstein Ewing, S. W.

Publication year

2021

Journal title

American journal of preventive medicine

Volume

60

Issue

5

Page(s)

629-638
Abstract
Abstract
Introduction: Black women are at disproportionately greater risk for HIV and sexually transmitted infections than women of other ethnic/racial backgrounds. Alcohol use may further elevate the risk of HIV/sexually transmitted infection acquisition and transmission. Study Design: A random-assignment parallel-group comparative treatment efficacy trial was conducted with random assignment to 1 of 3 conditions. Setting/participants: The sample comprised 560 Black or African American women aged 18–24 years who reported recent unprotected vaginal or anal sex and recent alcohol use. Participants were recruited from community settings in Atlanta, Georgia, from January 2012 to February 2014. Intervention: A Group Motivational Enhancement Therapy module was designed to complement a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention–designated evidence-based intervention (Horizons) to reduce sexual risk behaviors, alcohol use, and sexually transmitted infections, with 3 comparison groups: (1) Horizons + Group Motivational Enhancement Therapy intervention, (2) Horizons + General Health Promotion intervention, and (3) enhanced standard of care. Main outcome measures: Outcome measures included safe sex (abstinence or 100% condom use); condom nonuse; proportion of condom use during sexual episodes; incident chlamydia, gonorrhea, and trichomonas infections; and problematic alcohol use measured by Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test score. Treatment effects were estimated using an intention-to-treat protocol‒generalized estimating equations with logistic regression for binomial outcomes and Poisson regression for count outcomes. Analyses were conducted between October 2018 and October 2019. Results: Participants assigned to Horizons + Group Motivational Enhancement Therapy had greater odds of safe sex (AOR=1.45, 95% CI=1.04, 2.02, p=0.03), greater proportion of condom use (AOR=1.68, 95% CI=1.18, 2.41, p=0.004), and lower odds of condom nonuse (AOR=0.57, 95% CI=0.38, 0.83, p=0.004). Both interventions had lower odds of problematic alcohol use (Horizons: AOR=0.57, 95% CI=0.39, 0.85, p=0.006; Horizons + Group Motivational Enhancement Therapy: AOR=0.61, 95% CI=0.41, 0.90, p=0.01). Conclusions: Complementing an evidence-based HIV prevention intervention with Group Motivational Enhancement Therapy may increase safer sexual behaviors and concomitantly reduce alcohol use among young Black women who consume alcohol. Trial registration: This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01553682.

Increased alcohol use during the COVID-19 pandemic: The effect of mental health and age in a cross-sectional sample of social media users in the U.S.

Capasso, A., Jones, A. M., Ali, S. H., Foreman, J., Tozan, Y., & DiClemente, R. J.

Publication year

2021

Journal title

Preventive Medicine

Volume

145
Abstract
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic has triggered a public health crisis of unprecedented scale. Increased alcohol use has been extensively documented during other crises, particularly among persons with anxiety and depression. Despite COVID-19's differential impact by age, the association of age, mental health and alcohol use during the pandemic has not been explored. This study aimed to examine whether age modified the association of anxiety and depressive symptoms with alcohol use during the COVID-19 pandemic. Two online surveys were administered to U.S. adult social media users in March and April 2020. Generalized linear models were conducted in 2020 among 5850 respondents (52.9% female; 22.0% aged 18–39 years, 47.0% aged 40–59 years, and 31.0% aged ≥60 years) to examine if age modified the association of anxiety and depression symptomatology and alcohol use. Overall, 29% of respondents reported increased alcohol use. Adjusted odds ratios of reporting increased alcohol use were 1.41 (95% CI = 1.20–1.66) among respondents with anxiety symptoms and 1.64 (95% CI = 1.21–2.23) among those with depressive symptoms compared to those without such symptoms. Whereas respondents aged 18–39 years had the highest probability of reporting increased alcohol use, the probability of older persons (40–59 and ≥60 years) reporting increased drinking was much greater among those with symptoms of anxiety and depression, compared to those without symptoms. These findings warrant age-differentiated public health messaging on the risks of excessive alcohol use and scale-up of substance use services for middle-aged and older adults with symptoms of depression and anxiety.

Interpersonal abuse and alcohol use among African American young women: the mediating role of emotion dysregulation

Hitch, A. E., Brown, J. L., & DiClemente, R. J.

Publication year

2021

Journal title

Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse
Abstract
Abstract
African American women experience a high prevalence of alcohol-related consequences, and no studies have explicitly examined the associations among lifetime interpersonal abuse, emotion dysregulation, and alcohol-related outcomes during the critical period of young adulthood within this population. This study used baseline data from a sample of African American young women (N = 560) who use alcohol, aged 18 to 24, enrolled in an HIV prevention intervention trial to examine whether emotion dysregulation mediated the relation between lifetime history of abuse and problematic alcohol use. Further, we sought to examine whether there were potential differential levels of problematic alcohol use based on the number of abuse types experienced. Multiple regression analyses showed that exposure to two or more forms of abuse was associated with problematic alcohol use, β =.24, p <.001, and heavy alcohol consumption, β =.23, p <.001, whereas history of a single form was not. Indirect effects of both single and multiple forms of abuse on problematic alcohol use (95% confidence interval [CI] [.16, 1.02]; [.46, 1.64]) and heavy alcohol consumption (95% CI [.02,.26]; [.05,.45]) via emotion dysregulation severity were found. Abuse and emotion dysregulation were associated with frequency of alcohol use and binge drinking, but not typical amount consumed. Hazardous alcohol consumption was prevalent among this sample of African American young women who use alcohol. This study provides preliminary evidence that emotion dysregulation may be an important mechanism buttressing the association between lifetime history of interpersonal abuse and problematic alcohol use among African American young women who use alcohol.

Knowledge, beliefs, mental health, substance use, and behaviors related to the COVID-19 pandemic among US adults: a national online survey

DiClemente, R. J., Capasso, A., Ali, S. H., Jones, A. M., Foreman, J., & Tozan, Y.

Publication year

2021

Journal title

Zeitschrift fur Gesundheitswissenschaften
Abstract
Abstract
Aim: Given the need for data to inform public health messaging to mitigate the COVID-19 pandemic, this national survey sought to assess the state of COVID-19-related knowledge, beliefs, mental health, substance use changes, and behaviors among a sample of U.S. adults. Subject and methods: In the period March 20–30, 2020, we collected data on COVID-19-related knowledge, awareness and adoption of preventive practices, depression and anxiety (Patient Health Questionnaire-4), stress (Impact of Event Scale-6), pessimism, and tobacco and alcohol use. Differences between age groups (18–39 years, 40–59 years and ≥ 60 years) were tested using Pearson’s chi-squared tests or ANOVAs; associations between drinking and smoking and depression, anxiety, and stress were tested using adjusted logistic regression models. Results: Approximately half of the sample (NTotal = 6391) were 50–69 years old and 58% were female. COVID-19 knowledge (mean = 12.0; SD = 1.2) and protective practice awareness (mean = 9.1; SD = 0.8) were high. Among respondents, 44% had a score consistent with depression and anxiety (PHQ-4 score ≥ 6), and 52% reported high stress scores (≥ median of 1.33). COVID-19-related anxiety and depression were associated with increased drinking (AOR = 1.79; 95% CI = 1.49, 2.15) and smoking (AOR = 2.17; 95% CI = 1.64, 2.88). High stress scores were also associated with increased drinking (AOR = 1.80; 95% CI = 1.49, 2.17, p < 0.001) and smoking (AOR = 1.75; 95% CI = 1.31, 2.33). Conclusions: In spite of high knowledge levels, important gaps were identified. High prevalence of poor mental health outcomes and associated increases in drinking and smoking warrant ongoing risk communications tailoring to effectively disseminate information and expanding psychosocial services, particularly via telehealth, to mitigate the negative mental health impact of COVID-19.

Regional and socioeconomic predictors of perceived ability to access coronavirus testing in the United States: results from a nationwide online COVID-19 survey

Ali, S. H., Tozan, Y., Jones, A. M., Foreman, J., Capasso, A., & DiClemente, R. J.

Publication year

2021

Journal title

Annals of Epidemiology

Volume

58

Page(s)

7-14
Abstract
Abstract
Purpose: Access to COVID-19 testing remained a salient issue during the early months of the pandemic, therefore this study aimed to identify 1) regional and 2) socioeconomic predictors of perceived ability to access Coronavirus testing. Methods: An online survey using social media-based advertising was conducted among U.S. adults in April 2020. Participants were asked whether they thought they could acquire a COVID-19 test, along with basic demographic, socioeconomic and geographic information. Results: A total of 6,378 participants provided data on perceived access to COVID-19 testing. In adjusted analyses, we found higher income and possession of health insurance to be associated with perceived ability to access Coronavirus testing. Geographically, perceived access was highest (68%) in East South Central division and lowest (39%) in West North Central. Disparities in health insurance coverage did not directly correspond to disparities in perceived access to COVID-19 testing. Conclusions: Sex, geographic location, income, and insurance status were associated with perceived access to COVID-19 testing; interventions aimed at improving either access or awareness of measures taken to improve access are warranted. These findings from the pandemic's early months shed light on the importance of disaggregating perceived and true access to screening during such crises.

Sleep medication use and incident dementia in a nationally representative sample of older adults in the US

Robbins, R., DiClemente, R. J., Troxel, A. B., Jean-Louis, G., Butler, M., Rapoport, D. M., & Czeisler, C. A.

Publication year

2021

Journal title

Sleep Medicine

Volume

79

Page(s)

183-189
Abstract
Abstract
Background: Sleep difficulties are common among older adults, and clinical management of sleep difficulties commonly includes sleep medication (pharmacological and non-pharmacological). Our research examines sleep medication use and incident dementia over 8 years using nationally representative data from older adults ages 65 years and older in the United States. Methods: We used data collected from the National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS), a nationally-representative longitudinal study of Medicare beneficiaries. Routine sleep medication use (pharmacological and non-pharmacological) was defined as use “most nights” or “every night.” Participants were screened for dementia with validated instruments that assessed memory, orientation, and executive function. We conduct prospective analyses to examine the relationship between routine sleep medication use and incident dementia using Cox proportional hazards modeling and estimated survival curves. Analyses controlled for age, sex, marital status, education, and chronic conditions. Results: Among respondents at baseline (n = 6373), most participants (21%) were age 70–74 years of age. Participants were 59% female and the sample comprised non-Hispanic White (71%). At baseline, 15% of our study sample reported using sleep medication routinely, which is representative of 4.6 million older adults in the US. Covariate adjusted proportional hazard models revealed that routinely using sleep medication was associated with incident dementia (HR = 1.30, 95%CI: 1.10 to 1.53, p < 0.01). Conclusions: Our study observed, in a nationally representative study of older adults in the US across 8 years of data that 15% of older adults report routinely using sleep medication, yet routine use of sleeping medication was associated with incident dementia across the follow-up interval. Future research may examine behavioral approaches to improving sleep among older adults.

Social Media Versus Traditional Clinic-Based Recruitment for a Dyadic Sexually Transmitted Infection Prevention Trial: Results From the Sexperience Study

Woods, C., Yusuf, H., Matson, P., Marcell, A. V., DiClemente, R., Fields, E., & Trent, M.

Publication year

2021

Journal title

Journal of Adolescent Health

Volume

69

Issue

4

Page(s)

668-671
Abstract
Abstract
Background: The enrollment of youth in clinical trials has generally been achieved through conventional in-person recruitment but is evolving with the surge in the use of social media and presents an alternative resource for research recruitment for sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention trials. Purpose: To compare the direct costs and performance of social media recruitment versus clinic-based recruitment method for a dyadic behavioral intervention for STI among heterosexual couples. Methods: In the clinic-based recruitment arm spanning 60 weeks, patients aged 16–25 years were recruited through an adolescent/young adult clinic. Social media adverts targeting college students within the city were also posted online over 23 weeks, using Facebook ad software. We compared the direct costs and performance of both recruitment methods to assess feasibility. Results: Three hundred eighty-one individuals were approached, of which 21 completed the dyadic intervention (11 from social media–based recruitment and 10 from clinic-based recruitment). Clinic-based recruitment accounted for 91.0% of total recruitment cost and 9.9% of the total cost was spent on social media recruitment via Facebook ad. Conclusions: Recruitment of adolescents and young adults for a dyadic behavioral STI intervention trial using social media is feasible, has lower direct costs, and results in similar outcomes compared to clinic-based recruitment.

The Influence of Familial and Peer Social Support on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Among Black Girls in Juvenile Correctional Facilities

Quinn, C. R., Boyd, D. T., Kim, B. K. E., Menon, S. E., Logan-Greene, P., Asemota, E., Diclemente, R. J., & Voisin, D.

Publication year

2021

Journal title

Criminal Justice and Behavior

Volume

48

Issue

7

Page(s)

867-883
Abstract
Abstract
Black girls bear a higher burden of juvenile justice involvement in the United States, relative to other racial/ethnic female groups. Emerging evidence suggests that system involvement is related to trauma histories and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study investigated the associations between individual, family, and peer factors, and their relationship to PTSD among Black girls with juvenile justice involvement. Cross-sectional data were collected from 188 Black girls in detention. Measures assessed were history of abuse, negative peer norms, future orientation, caregiver support, self-esteem, age, and PTSD symptoms. Major regression findings indicated that higher rates of caregiver support, higher negative peer norms, lower self-esteem rates, and lower future orientation rates were correlated with greater PTSD symptoms. Treatment programs for this population warrant a multisystemic approach, which includes caregivers and peers, and bolstering important constructs such as self-esteem and hopefulness.

A longitudinal examination of African American adolescent females detained for status offense

Kim, B. K. E., Quinn, C. R., Logan-Greene, P., DiClemente, R., & Voisin, D.

Publication year

2020

Journal title

Children and Youth Services Review

Volume

108
Abstract
Abstract
Introduction: Behaviors like truancy, running away, curfew violation, and alcohol possession fall under the status offense category and can have serious consequences for adolescents. The Juvenile Justice and Delinquency and Prevention Act prohibited detaining status offenders. We explored the degree to which African American adolescent girls were being detained for status offenses and the connections to their behavioral health risks and re-confinement. Methods: 188 African American girls (aged 13–17), recruited from detention facilities, were surveyed at baseline and 3-month follow-ups. Logistic regression models estimated the likelihood of longitudinal re-confinement, controlling for sexual and behavioral health risk factors. Results: One third of the overall sample was detained for a status offense. Status offenders were exposed to higher peer risk profiles. At follow-up, nearly 39% of status offenders reported re-confinement. Compared to youth with other offenses, those who violated a court order (type of status offense) were 3 times more likely to be re-confined. Controlling for sexual and behavioral health risk factors, the odds of re-confinement was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Overall findings suggest that courts and detention facilities must devote specialized resources to addressing the socio-behavioral needs of African American girls with status offenses so as not to use detention as an intervention.

A system-level intervention to encourage collaboration between juvenile justice and public health agencies to promote hiv/sti testing

Elkington, K. S., Spaulding, A., Gardner, S., Knight, D., Belenko, S., Becan, J. E., Robertson, A. A., Oser, C., & Diclemente, R.

Publication year

2020

Journal title

AIDS Education and Prevention

Volume

32

Issue

4

Page(s)

337-355
Abstract
Abstract
Justice-involved youth are at high risk for HIV and STIs, and justice agencies are uniquely poised to offer HIV/STI testing. However, testing in these settings is not routine and represents a missed opportunity. This study describes a system-level implementation intervention designed to increase access to HIV/STI testing through juvenile justice (JJ) and public health agency collaboration across six counties in six states in the United States. Local change teams, active facilitation, and training were utilized to facilitate agency partnerships and development of HIV/STI practice change protocols. Five counties established health and JJ partnerships and four counties successfully implemented their protocols. Sites with HIV/STI education and testing protocols behaviorally screened 98.5% of youth and tested 41.2% of those youth; 0% were HIV+ and 43.2% had an STI. The intervention provides a feasible, scalable solution, through promoting partnerships between JJ and health agencies, to link youth to testing and treatment services.

Adapting a home telemonitoring intervention for underserved Hispanic/Latino patients with type 2 diabetes: an acceptability and feasibility study

Pekmezaris, R., Williams, M. S., Pascarelli, B., Finuf, K. D., Harris, Y. T., Myers, A. K., Taylor, T., Kline, M., Patel, V. H., Murray, L. M., McFarlane, S. I., Pappas, K., Lesser, M. L., Makaryus, A. N., Martinez, S., Kozikowski, A., Polo, J., Guzman, J., Zeltser, R., Marino, J., Pena, M., DiClemente, R. J., & Granville, D.

Publication year

2020

Journal title

BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making

Volume

20

Issue

1
Abstract
Abstract
Background: Home telemonitoring is a promising approach to optimizing outcomes for patients with Type 2 Diabetes; however, this care strategy has not been adapted for use with understudied and underserved Hispanic/Latinos (H/L) patients with Type 2 Diabetes. Methods: A formative, Community-Based Participatory Research approach was used to adapt a home telemonitoring intervention to facilitate acceptability and feasibility for vulnerable H/L patients. Utilizing the ADAPT-ITT framework, key stakeholders were engaged over an 8-month iterative process using a combination of strategies, including focus groups and structured interviews. Nine Community Advisory Board, Patient Advisory, and Provider Panel Committee focus group discussions were conducted, in English and Spanish, to garner stakeholder input before intervention implementation. Focus groups and structured interviews were also conducted with 12 patients enrolled in a 1-month pilot study, to obtain feedback from patients in the home to further adapt the intervention. Focus groups and structured interviews were approximately 2 hours and 30 min, respectively. All focus groups and structured interviews were audio-recorded and professionally transcribed. Structural coding was used to mark responses to topical questions in the moderator and interview guides. Results: Two major themes emerged from qualitative analyses of Community Advisory Board/subcommittee focus group data. The first major theme involved intervention components to maximize acceptance/usability. Subthemes included tablet screens (e.g., privacy/identity concerns; enlarging font sizes; lighter tablet to facilitate portability); cultural incongruence (e.g., language translation/literacy, foods, actors “who look like me”); nursing staff (e.g., ensuring accessibility; appointment flexibility); and, educational videos (e.g., the importance of information repetition). A second major theme involved suggested changes to the randomized control trial study structure to maximize participation, including a major restructuring of the consenting process and changes designed to optimize recruitment strategies. Themes from pilot participant focus group/structured interviews were similar to those of the Community Advisory Board such as the need to address and simplify a burdensome consenting process, the importance of assuring privacy, and an accessible, culturally congruent nurse. Conclusions: These findings identify important adaptation recommendations from the stakeholder and potential user perspective that should be considered when implementing home telemonitoring for underserved patients with Type 2 Diabetes. Trial registration: NCT03960424; ClinicalTrials.gov (US National Institutes of Health). Registered 23 May 2019. Registered prior to data collection. https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03960424?term=NCT03960424&draw=2&rank=1

An Exploratory Structural Equation Model of Stress-Related Experiences Among Justice-Involved Youth: A Gender Comparison

Dembo, R., Krupa, J. M., Wareham, J., Faber, J., Cristiano, J., Diclemente, R. J., Terminello, A., & Schmeidler, J.

Publication year

2020

Journal title

Criminal Justice and Behavior

Volume

47

Issue

2

Page(s)

127-144
Abstract
Abstract
Youth involved in the juvenile justice system demonstrate greater risk of exposure to negative life experiences. The present study explores the prevalence of three stress-related experiences (sexual assault victimization, bullying/victimization, and minority sexual orientation) among newly arrested adolescents. Gender (biological sex) differences were examined as well as associations with sociodemographic characteristics, depressive symptoms, substance use, and sexually transmitted infection (STI). Factor analyses found a single factor of stress for both genders. Prevalence rates for bullying/victimization, sexual assault victimization, and sexual minority status were higher for girls than boys. Girls were also more likely than boys to test positive for STIs and experience depressive symptoms, while boys were more likely than girls to test positive for marijuana use. Depression and drug-related problems were associated with the stress construct for girls only. Bivariate comparisons with the three stress measures and sociodemographic characteristics indicated age and race effects. Implications are discussed.

Can a Multilevel STI/HIV Prevention Strategy for High Risk African American Adolescents Improve Life Satisfaction?

Zullig, K. J., Valois, R. F., Hobbs, G. R., Kerr, J. C., Romer, D., Carey, M. P., Brown, L. K., DiClemente, R. J., & Vanable, P. A.

Publication year

2020

Journal title

Journal of Happiness Studies

Volume

21

Issue

2

Page(s)

417-436
Abstract
Abstract
Addressing adolescent sexual risk behaviors in the STI/HIV prevention literature is well documented; however, impacts from interventions on life satisfaction are relatively unexplored. This study examined data (n = 1658) from a randomized, multi-site, multi-level STI/HIV prevention intervention trial (Project iMPAACS) to determine whether increased protective and reduced sexual risk-taking behaviors associated with STI/HIV would also improve self-reported life satisfaction. Taking into account the nested study design and controlling for confounders, a mixed model ANOVA was performed where Total mean life satisfaction scores were analyzed at baseline and 3, 6, 12, and 18 months post-recruitment. Significance levels of 0.05 were used to determine significance and η2 was used to assess effect size. We hypothesized that as intervention participants engaged in the intentional activity associated with increasing protective behaviors and reducing sexual risk-taking behaviors associated with STI/HIV, life satisfaction reports would also improve over the course of the intervention. A significant main effect for sex was detected (F = 5.19, p =.02, η2 =.03), along with three interactions: between experimental condition and media intervention (F = 7.96, p =.005, η2=.04); experimental condition, sex, and media intervention (F = 6.51, p =.01, η2 =.04); and experimental condition, sex, assessment point, and media intervention (F = 3.23, p =.01, η2 =.02). With the exception of the control condition, female life satisfaction reports improved from baseline assessments to 18-months post-recruitment, whereas male reports decreased. Project iMPPACS was not designed with the intent on improving participants’ life satisfaction. However, study results suggest incorporating strategies to address subjective well-being into future adolescent STI/HIV risk-reduction interventions is beneficial for females and additional research is necessary for males.

Compassion Meditation Training for Hospital Chaplain Residents: A Pilot Study

Ash, M. J., Walker, E. R., DiClemente, R. J., Florian, M. P., Palmer, P. K., Wehrmeyer, K., Negi, L. T., Grant, G. H., Raison, C. L., & Mascaro, J. S.

Publication year

2020

Journal title

Journal of Health Care Chaplaincy
Abstract
Abstract
This study examines the effectiveness of incorporating compassion meditation training into a clinical pastoral education (CPE) curriculum to enhance compassion satisfaction and reduce burnout among hospital chaplain residents. Specifically, a longitudinal, quasi-experimental design was used to examine the impact of Cognitively-Based Compassion Training (CBCT), a group-delivered compassion meditation intervention. Hospital chaplain residents (n = 15) were assigned to participate in a CBCT intervention or a waitlist comparison group. Chaplains assigned to CBCT reported significant decreases in burnout and anxiety compared to the waitlist group; effects were not maintained at 4-month follow-up. Other outcomes, including compassion satisfaction, did not differ significantly but were trending in the expected direction. Findings suggest that compassion meditation training incorporated into CPE promotes chaplain wellbeing, although it may be necessary to extend CBCT throughout residency to sustain effects.

Contact

rjd438@nyu.edu 708 Broadway 6FL New York, NY, 10003