Melody Goodman

Goodman, Melody
Melody Goodman

Interim Chair of Biostatistics

Associate Professor of Biostatistics

Professional overview

Dr. Melody Goodman’s efforts seek to understand the social risk factors that contribute to health disparities in urban areas, with the goal of developing culturally competent, region-specific, and evidence-based solutions through collaborative activities with community members, community-based organizations, faith-based organizations, and other community health stakeholders. The purpose of her work is the development of solutions for improving health in minority and medically underserved communities.  

Dr. Goodman conducts applied biostatistical and survey research for community-based interventions and health disparities research with a strong focus on measurement. Additionally, through academic-community collaborations, she implements, evaluates, and enhances the infrastructure of community-engaged research, in order to mitigate health disparities. As such, Dr. Goodman is the Principal Investigator of a Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) grant that aims to validate and implement a quantitative survey measure to assess the level of community engagement in patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) and clinical effectiveness research (CER) studies from the community stakeholder perspective.

Previously, Dr. Goodman has been subcontracted by the National Human Genome Research Institute/NIH to analyze patterns of beliefs about the genetic causation of health conditions and health behaviors among community health center patients. She was the Principal Investigator on a NIH Partners in Research grant entitled Community Alliance for Research Empowering Social change (CARES). With numerous funders supporting her work, she has published over 70 peer-reviewed journal articles.

Education

BS, Economics and Applied Mathematics & Statistics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY
MS, Biostatistics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
PhD, Biostatistics (Minors: Social Determinants of Health Disparities and Theoretical Statistics), Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

Honors and awards

Siteman Cancer Center “Rock Doc” (2013)
Satcher Health Leadership Institute - Morehouse School of Medicine, Community Health Leadership Institute Intensive Cohort II (2013)
Women of the Year - Health, National Coalition of 100 Black Women, Inc. - Suffolk Chapter (2010)
President’s Award for Teaching Excellence - Stony Brook University (2009)
President’s Award for Excellence in Team Achievement - Stony Brook University (2008)

Areas of research and study

Biostatistics
Community Health
Community-based Participatory Research
Dissemination and Implementation of Evidence-based Programs
Health Disparities
Health Equity
Minorities
Minority Health
Quantitative Research

Publications

Publications

An evaluation of multiple behavioral risk factors for cancer in a working class, multi-ethnic population

Goodman, M., Li, Y., Bennett, G. G., Stoddard, A. M., & Emmons, K.

Publication year

2006

Journal title

Journal of Data Science

Volume

4

Page(s)

291

Attitudes regarding overweight, exercise, and health among Blacks (United States)

Bennett, G. G., Wolin, K. Y., Goodman, M., Samplin-Salgado, M., Carter, P., Dutton, S., Hill, R., & Emmons, K.

Publication year

2006

Journal title

Cancer Causes and Control

Volume

17

Issue

1

Page(s)

95-101
Abstract
Objective: To investigate Blacks'views regarding the connections among overweight, exercise, and health. Methods: A national randomized telephone survey of 986 US Blacks, conducted between 6 July 2004 and 15 July 2004. Results: The majority (65%) of respondents reported their weight as average or underweight. Most participants also reported being regularly physically active in the last month (84.5%). The majority of participants reported believing that it is possible to be overweight and healthy. Most acknowledged the connection between exercise and health, and just over half of respondents identified the association between overweight and cancer risk. There was little sociodemographic variation in responses, although findings differed by self-reported overweight and physical activity. Conclusions: Some Blacks may underestimate the extent of their overweight, perhaps resulting from the high prevalence of the condition in the population. Gaps exist in Blacks' recognition of the connection between weight and health, although the importance of exercise for health promotion was widely acknowledged. These data may highlight an important target for intervention attention.

Contact

mg5449@nyu.edu +1 (212) 992-5623 715/719 Broadway New York, NY 10003